A Little Respect

“Unless Mexico is going to treat the United States fairly, with respect, such a meeting would be fruitless, and I want to go a different route. We have no choice.”
 
See Trump slams Mexico as leader cancels trip
Trump’s “newspeak” continues. He’s now defining “respect” as a victim folding to the demands of the extortionist… See, Trump is the extortionist here, the party to NAFTA who has no respect for an equal partner, Mexico. Trump is demanding Mexico agree to paying unknown $billions for a wall that is of no benefit to Mexico. For Trump to demand respect when Trump has no decency at all is simply abuse of us all, our common sense, our sense of right and wrong, custom, law and the Constitution. Trump does not have the power to destroy USA’s reputation as a law-abiding nation in the world. The Constitution was set up with checks and balances to prevent that. Extortion of a major trading partner, an ally in the war on drugs, and a neighbour closely integrated socially with USA is an impeachable offence and the sooner the Congress gets around to that the sooner USA’s rapidly deteriorating reputation can be repaired.

How far will the Congress allow this to go? A trade war? Shutting down the border entirely? A shooting war? Where will it end? It’s all so pointless. It’s all based on whim of a madman.

UPDATE – Trump plans a 20% duty on goods from Mexico to pay for the damned wall. Expect Mexico to lay on a 30% duty in reply. War begins. How many millions of USAians are about to lose their jobs because of Trump’s ignorance?

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in technology. Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to A Little Respect

  1. dougman wrote, “You still failed to implement one at your own house. Your wife is using Intel, and a thick fat client desktop.””

    Her file-system is mounted from the server even if her apps are running locally. I could change that but I’d want more RAM on the server. Instead I’m going with a new ARMed server with plenty of RAM. End of story. She does have the same software installed on her thick client so she wouldn’t even notice such a change until the browsers ran out of RAM.

  2. dougman says:

    “For pure academic purpose, let’s assume, just for a second, that ChromeBook is indeed a thin client (which it is not). You still failed to implement one at your own house. Your wife is using Intel, and a thick fat client desktop.”

    FEEL THE BURN

  3. Deaf Spy wrote, “Chromebooks, based on a web 2.0 + some desktop sprinkle, are quite of a thick-client using server-based services. This is more like a traditional two-tier client-server architecture, but definitely not a thin client.”

    There are degrees of “thin client”-ness… The thing they have in common is that some application used somewhere is running and using resources somewhere else. Even my old x86 VIA thin clients had a real GNU/Linux system with an X-server running on them that connected to a server running applications and a desktop session. Many thin clients have more or less of an operating system and one or more applications running on a server or cluster of servers. It’s all the same idea, that a powerful machine can do the job better than trying to give everyone a powerful machine on/under/near their desk. Servers are usually big and noisy and in racks. Those have no place near a desk or in a home or office but they may indeed be able to run some application better than an affordable thick client.

    So, yes, a ChromeBook is a kind of thin client, just not as thin as some. They are a lot like my thin clients except they use HTTP instead of X for remote connections. It’s all the same, a client connected to an application over a network. It allows having cheaper, lighter, less expensive clients getting the job done for users. In schools, thin clients are ideal as almost all students have need of the same applications and 1/N of a big server plus N thin clients is less expensive than N powerful thick clients. Moore’s Law and networks made that possible. We should take advantage of that.

    I and TLW could use ChromeBooks as our thin clients but we would lose the flexibility to do some things I like doing like keeping our own data on our own servers in our own home. It’s easier this way than trying to work around the limitations of ChromeBooks and what Google offers. My current server cost ~$1500 many years ago. That’s less expensive than paying for “cloud” services or databasery out on the web. Further, if anything goes wrong or I want to change anything I can because it’s mine. That’s just me. Others may not have that preference or that ability.

  4. Deaf Spy says:

    ChromeBooks, in particular, a kind of thin client, are rapidly growing share.

    For pure academic purpose, let’s assume, just for a second, that ChromeBook is indeed a thin client (which it is not). You still failed to implement one at your own house. Your wife is using Intel, and a thick fat client desktop.

    Shame on you, Robert.

  5. Deaf Spy says:

    Sigh. Robert, you can’t even get your definition for a thin-client right.

    Chromebook is not quite a thin client. The whole concept of “Web 2.0”, as shaped by Google, is not quite a thin client. Google, having no foot on desktop, re-invented the desktop within a browser (with the strong help of Microsoft, see DHTML for reference, the now-we-all-love-it-ajax-calls). Putiful, inner-platform pattern, but it worked.

    Anyway, Chromebooks, based on a web 2.0 + some desktop sprinkle, are quite of a thick-client using server-based services. This is more like a traditional two-tier client-server architecture, but definitely not a thin client.

    Robert, why don’t you start by getting your basic facts straight? A, B, C…

  6. dougman wrote, “Chromebooks do not require a central server.”

    Uh, Google sure wants people to use servers:
    ” Usually, when you evaluate computers, you’re inclined to focus on a few hardware components that indicate how fast a computer is or how much memory it can hold. But now that most of what you do is online, it’s time to rethink hardware specs
     
    RAM
     
    Since you won’t have client apps to manage you don’t need that much RAM–everything you’re doing is being taken care of by super fast and super secure supercomputers.
     
    Hard Drive
     
    With most of your computing happening in the cloud, you have a supercomputer working on all those tabs you have open, so you can just focus on DOING. Chromebooks come with smaller hard drives because you have more storage in the cloud.
     
    Cloud Storage
     
    You have some storage on your device for those times you need to access a file without access to the internet, but for everything else you can access and store it in the cloud. And your Chromebook comes with 100GB of free Google Drive storage for 2 years.”

    So, it can function as a thick client but it’s pretty well crippled compared to the usual model. That’s intentional. Google wants to sell services on the web. That’s great for many purposes, but to get things done in-house, you need a server for file-storage/databases/applications and so on.

  7. dougman says:

    “ChromeBooks, in particular, a kind of thin client,”

    That’s a farrrrrr..stretch you buffoon. Chromebooks do not require a central server.

  8. Deaf Spy wrote, sarcastically, “See, a match made in Heaven”

    This is the “before Trump” picture. The after Trump picture can be very different and soon. I think the president of Mexico and the PM of Canada should be hedging bets at a great rate now. I’d be pushing BC, ON, PQ, NS, NB provinces to build/grow seaports ASAP, railways to redouble rolling stock and highways to ramp up refreshes nation-wide. Trade has been north-south for ages but it can change. The choice, IMHO, is to suffer abuse by Trump for a few years or to be free of him in one or two. I hope the US Senate is able to block Trump from doing substantial harm to the global economy but I wouldn’t count on it. USA has drunk a lot of Trump Koolaid.

    Deaf Spy also wrote, “like ARM chips on desktop and servers, thin-clients, LibreOffice”.

    Yes! There’s the new world order in IT. That’s reality. Thin clients continue to maintain share. ChromeBooks, in particular, a kind of thin client, are rapidly growing share.

  9. Deaf Spy says:

    Real world facts. Canada’s chief partner is US
    Exports: US 76.7% (2015)
    Imports: US 53.1%, China 12.2%, Mexico 5.8% (2015)

    See, a match made in Heaven

    A match made in your fantasy world, Robert. Just like ARM chips on desktop and servers, thin-clients, LibreOffice, etc., etc.

  10. Deaf Spy wrote, ” China imports mostly resources they need to produce goods. China’s internal consumption is low, compared to US, Canada and EU. Very low. China imports mainly in order to produce. US, Canada and EU import a lot to consume”.

    See, a match made in Heaven. Canada has an abundance of coal, oil, minerals, wood that China would love to have and Canada wants a lot of food we can’t grow here and consumer-products. It’s all good. We can also ship by sea between Mexico and Canada if Trump blocks the road/rail-route.

  11. Deaf Spy says:

    Instead they should redouble trade with China and the rest of the world.

    You are not paying attention in class, Robert. The structure of trade, i.e. what is being traded, is quite important. Again, specially for you, Robert. What US imports is not what China imports.

    Further, you heavily overestimate the China’s capacity as importer. China imports mostly resources they need to produce goods. China’s internal consumption is low, compared to US, Canada and EU. Very low. China imports mainly in order to produce. US, Canada and EU import a lot to consume, and they can also consume their own production (albeit at lower rate, of course) if necessary.

    Summary is, one can’t simply sell what one produces to another buyer, because that other buyer may not need it, but need something slightly different. Or being unable to buy your goods.

    I stop here. For more, I should charge you, and I know you prefer to get everything for free.

  12. Deaf Spy wrote, “USA, Robert, are a major importer in the international trade.”

    Well, that’s true today, but what about next year? USA is big in trade no doubt but it’s share of GDP due to trade is only 30%. Much of the world depends far more on trade than that. Mexico and Canada, for instance, trade 64% of GDP. If USA proves unreliable, the world will quickly adapt. Canada and Mexico would be crazy to lay down and let Trump walk all over them. Instead they should redouble trade with China and the rest of the world. I suggested Canada mobilize last year, not imagining Trump would be the problem. This year, I would pull out all the stops and build multiple seaports and highways and railways leading to the rest of the world. Trump is crazy and USA is crazy to bring him to power. He has no sense of reason in dealing with sovereign countries and global trade. We would be crazy to depend on him.

  13. Deaf Spy says:

    I think you’ll find USA is no longer that big a market compared to the world that it is a “must have” destination for products.

    Bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha! Robert, you’re really astounding in your effort to achieve new levels of silliness.

    USA, Robert, are a major importer in the international trade. The second biggest after EU, and very close to that. China come third, but with a major difference (almost twice). But. There is a huge difference between what USA and China import, Robert. Mexico, being a prominent exporter to US (13.2%), can’t just move on to China. If it could, it would have already done so, Robert.

    But keep dreaming that China will overthrow US, and make Linux great. And ARM, too. 🙂

  14. oiaohm wrote, “much of Mexico exports are machines and the like that can be transported a long way so that allows products from Mexico to export to the likes of china or Canada for final assemble then imported into the USA as made in those countries”.

    I think you’ll find USA is no longer that big a market compared to the world that it is a “must have” destination for products. If Mexico exports to China, India, Australia, Indonesia, Japan, etc. it may not need to export nearly as much to USA. Those car-factories can crank out small efficient automobiles for emerging markets around the world. It just requires patience and more shipping ports. The big container-ships will do the rest. Trump is cutting off USA’s nose to spite his face.

    Trump’s strategy appears to be to break all multi-national trade agreements so that he can bully every little nation to give USA some sweet deal. What if the world sees through that and carries on without USA being involved in world trade? Trump will get the isolation he richly deserves and the rest of us will carry on. Expect a big drop in GDP and employment in USA by the time of the next election. Trump will be a footnote about another failed tyrant. The world is full of them.

  15. oiaohm says:

    http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/mex/
    http://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/usa/

    Kurkosdr really its not hard to look up. Mexico depends on USA for half their trade. Of course there are not like there are not stupid ways around something like trump has done. Do notice home much of Mexico exports are machines and the like that can be transported a long way so that allows products from Mexico to export to the likes of china or Canada for final assemble then imported into the USA as made in those countries .

    30% duty will put more force on Mexico to have lower paid wages. Still will not address the USA problem of importing more than USA is exporting.

    The shock horror of the 30% duty is the items from Mexico that the 30% duty will go on are a lot of items USA need for products it exports. So 30% duty on Mexico but places like China being even more competitive against USA companies.

  16. Kurkosdr wrote, “Which will be a non-issue since all “American” things Mexico buys are made in Mexico or imported from China.”

    USAian consumers will pay for the damned wall if it is built, which is doubtful. It’s a useless measure which will only increase prices/profits for smugglers and people overstaying visas.

  17. dougman says:

    “War begins.”

    Only in your silly mind. Mexico already lays a 30% tariff on certain items.

    http://www.sice.oas.org/TPD/TPP/Final_Texts/English/MEX_Tariff_Sched.pdf

  18. Kurkosdr says:

    ” Expect Mexico to lay on a 30% duty in reply. ”

    Which will be a non-issue since all “American” things Mexico buys are made in Mexico or imported from China.

Leave a Reply