Morocco: Green Is Good

“Morocco is looking ahead to a bright future. Literally.
 
The government is installing energy-efficient lights and solar technology in more than 100 mosques in 2016 and plans to expand the program over the next five years to include 15,000 state-funded mosques. That represents nearly 30% of all mosques in the country.
 
The so-called “green mosques” initiative is part of Morocco’s ambitious push into renewable energy. It’s spending billions of dollars to wean itself off imported fuel and reduce emissions by ramping up the use of energy efficient technology and renewables.”
 
See Morocco: 15,000 mosques are going green
Yes! Roofs of buildings and wide open spaces are great places to collect energy from Nature to run our lives. It just makes sense to go green. All new buildings should have this built in saving even greater costs. To break even in a few years makes this one of the best investments we can make.

In the next few years I intend to set up a small solar/wind farm on my property to do things like supply backup power, charge batteries, and perhaps charge my electric car (Which I don’t have yet.).

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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21 Responses to Morocco: Green Is Good

  1. ram says:

    Sounds like the USA will bomb Morocco next!

  2. dougman says:

    “It’s just a pity about the freight.”

    So freight companies cannot make a living?

  3. dougman wrote, “NIFE batteries were fine 100 years ago, but ahem, there are better technologies these days.”

    NiFe is an old technology but there have been some improvements to low-temperature operation and manufacture has been largely automated so prices are reasonable. It’s just a pity about the freight. I think as the technology regains strength in North America we will see more businesses importing good Chinese batteries in bulk and selling at a reasonable markup, minimizing the cut due to freight.

    The chief advantages of NiFe are very low maintenance and durability. There’s just nothing to compare at a reasonable price. Perhaps this can be one of the manufacturing technologies that Trump can bring back. NiFe was largely banished because a lead-acid maker cornered the market by buying out the last maker of NiFe. Solar/wind backup is nearly ideal with NiFe because of the long lifetimes. Some of Edison’s original product still works.

  4. dougman says:

    NIFE batteries were fine 100 years ago, but ahem, there are better technologies these days.

    For example, betavoltaics are such that you don’t even need a solar-array or a wind-turbine erected. They have been around for a decent time, but who wants to have a radioactive pile in their home?

    Furthermore, an aluminum-air battery was sought back in the 70s for automobiles. Instead of stopping at a gas station for a filling of those NASTY hydrocarbons, yum. You purchase a new wedge of aluminium, and pump out the hydroxide waste.

    Eh, I rather just run off wood-gas. The fuel is cheap.

  5. DrLoser wrote, “since almost nobody uses Debian, nobody really cares.”

    …or not. “Debian is used by 11.8% of all the websites whose operating system we know.”

    See Usage statistics and market share of Debian for websites. Debian is just a tad behind Ubuntu GNU/Linux in usage share. So, since your premise is false we can neglect the rest of his comment.

  6. DrLoser says:

    That doesn’t work very well in the real world of GNU/Linux.

    I fear you may simply regard Ivan’s comment as a sarcastic personal attack, rather than an objective assessment of this putative “real world” of yours, Robert.

    Let me set you straight. Ivan is entirely correct on the matter of the quoted vulnerability, in much the same way that Dougie is entirely correct in his exposition of your utter incompetence when it comes to the purchase and usage of battery storage.

    Linux distros work on a power series, really. Which means that a vulnerability in RedHat (or its CentOS clone) is the first one to hit, as a Black Hat. Following that, there is Ubuntu (as here). And since almost nobody uses Debian, nobody really cares.

    But if anybody did really care, then the exploit is precisely the same. Find the same offsets into the heap, etc, and bingo!. Exactly the same process.

    The only question would be — is it worth it? Well, that depends upon the target. But if you have, say, the dedicated resources of a PRC intelligence unit behind you, and the target is worth while, then … sure, it’s worth it.

    And the best part about this (if you are the man in charge of the PRC intelligence unit) is that you get to examine the code for free!

    Needless to say, you also get to examine the vulnerabilities for free.

  7. DrLoser says:

    Nonsense. NiFe batteries live forever and don’t mind the cold. They don’t lose much capacity down to -10C.

    A wonderful technology is NiFe, Robert. I have fond memories of my first job, working for (as it happened) a Canadian conglomerate, INCO. Basically, NiFe batteries is all we did.

    Sadly, it was not enough to keep the company alive as a financial proposition. (It was bought by, I believe, a hedge fund. Most failures are, these days.)

    Why? Because there really isn’t a mass market for NiFe batteries these days. Your quoted company is a puissant little nothing down in Gainesville, Florida, who can only manage a single “industry news” quote every second year. They talk big, but they’re all mouth and no trousers.

    Even current lithium ion batteries piss all over NiFe. (They are also equally well-suited to low temperature environments, btw.) Better power, better energy, better DoD%, better efficiency … but there is one specific environment that should suit NiFe technology very well, as far as I can see.

    Off the top of my head, I will nominate the salt mines of the Danakil depression in Ethiopia. A fairly brutal place, where temperatures are routinely in the 40-60 C range. NiFe tech is perfect for this.

    Given your weirdo miserly proclivities, I might just have found the ideal retirement home for you, Robert.

  8. Ivan says:

    That doesn’t work very well in the real world of GNU/Linux.

    You mean the real world where people use Ubuntu or Fedora as desktops or is this the imaginary world where people rent time on AWS to build everything against a non-existent custom libc in Debian before they get shot while drinking beer on their front porch?

  9. dougman wrote, “What from China?”

    I guess so. Does anyone other than China or India make them these days? Freight is a killer but if you buy a container load or a single crate, it’s not too bad.

  10. kurkosdr wrote, “I wonder how many LTSes back the patches will be backported.”

    The exploit is conditioned on particular combinations of particular builds of certain packages. That doesn’t work very well in the real world of GNU/Linux with >100 distros. The demo targeted Ubuntu 16.04. So, the exploit won’t work on just about any previous version of an LTS release. Yes, there is a vulnerability in the source code but the exploit works only on the binary and just rebuilding with a different compiler or using different versions of libraries defeats it. See Advancing exploitation: a scriptless 0day exploit against Linux desktops

    “This vulnerability applies equally as well to Ubuntu 16.04, and probably anything else with gstreamer installed. To get the exploit to work on anything other than the exact Fedora versions noted above, though, you’d need to fiddle with a large number of heap and code offsets in the exploit.”

  11. kurkosdr says:

    Hmm…

    http://arstechnica.co.uk/security/2016/12/fedora-and-ubuntu-zero-days-hacking-linux/

    I wonder how many LTSes back the patches will be backported. Mr Pogson has once demanded (in February 2015) that Server 2003 should be patched against all possible vulnerabilites(1). So, I guess that -according to Pogs way of thinking- if Fedora and Ubuntu won’t release a fix for all LTSes from 12 years ago to current, they are compromising users’ security and their OSes are “broken and tagged, Won’t Fix”. Or expose Pog for the hypocrite, double-standard-happy blogger he is.

    Let’s see how many LTSes back those fixed will be backported and judge accordingly…

    (1): http://mrpogson.com/2015/02/10/yes-that-other-os-is-broken-and-tagged-wont-fix/

  12. dougman says:

    “NiFe batteries”

    What from China?

  13. dougman nattered on about “high-voltage per IEC 60038 is defined as 35kV to 230 kV”, when what I wrote was “higher-voltage line”.

    I’ve worked on high voltage circuits and know the difference. For ion-sourcery, we sat on a wooden stool up 20KV and tweaked power-supplies driving electromagnets, RF devices and electrostatic lenses inside a Faraday cage. I’ve had a few jolts, too. Exciting but not lethal.

  14. dougman wrote, “Do you now?”

    Chuckle. Attended a technical high school where we studies electricity/electronics for three years, then 8 years of physics at university and then I worked as a cyclotron technician delivering all kinds of power from 300KW electromagnets to RF down a cable.

    dougman wrote, “Conversion from DC to AC will not really change anything”.

    Yes, it’s what the load wants. PV panels produce a few volts DC, perhaps 36V in a 300W panel. Combining them in series/parallel one can get various voltages. I could stick with 36V or 72V for safety outdoors. Stepping it up to a higher voltage will allow the power to be delivered with less I2R drops in the line due to lower I. It also allows smaller cable to deliver the power. The inverter and battery could be in a “dog-house” at the site. Yes, it’s good to bury the cable in a tube especially in a garden where someone might dig.

    Dougman wrote, “Only you, would keep a battery outside in the cold. Your life expectancy on such will be in the dumper.”

    Nonsense. NiFe batteries live forever and don’t mind the cold. They don’t lose much capacity down to -10C. In an insulated dog-house that would be easy to maintain even out in the garden. e.g. My garage is about 10C warmer inside than the outdoor temperature, simply because the ground under the garage is protected from freezing. That’s what garden-mulch can do. The heating of the battery during charge/discharge would easily maintain a good temperature. If I were concerned about that, I could apply a little extra heat to the dog-house.

  15. dougman says:

    “TLW would have something to say about that.”

    Whipped

    “No, it’s easier if they are in my garden between trees. I know how to deal with voltage drop.”

    Do you now? Ok, So tell me how a CEBMA curve would apply in your instance. It all depends on your KW rating of your array, distance and load, which determines the type and size of wire you use. And, for the love of god, do NOT bury service entrance wire in conduit!

    “Run the inverter close to the panels and run a higher-voltage line to where you need the power.”

    Inverter, outside, in a NEMA 1 enclosure? OK…sparky.

    Conversion from DC to AC will not really change anything and by the way, high-voltage per IEC 60038 is defined as 35kV to 230 kV, the NEC lists it as 69kV to 230kV. You should work better on your terminology.

    “I could have the battery there as well, just bringing a high voltage to my lights/pumps.”

    Only you, would keep a battery outside in the cold. Your life expectancy on such will be in the dumper.

  16. dougman wrote, “Your solar panels should be on your roof Robert, that is so to minimize voltage drop.”

    TLW would have something to say about that. No, it’s easier if they are in my garden between trees. I know how to deal with voltage drop. Run the inverter close to the panels and run a higher-voltage line to where you need the power. I could have the battery there as well, just bringing a high voltage to my lights/pumps.

  17. dougman says:

    Your solar panels should be on your roof Robert, that is so to minimize voltage drop.

  18. dougman suggested my trees would “overgrow your feeble devices.”

    Nope. I know the characteristics of my trees/shrubs. The solar panels and windmill would be set up over the shrubs where they would be casting some shade. Saskatoons are shade-tolerant.

  19. dougman wrote, “the tax would cost the average Canadian household $2,568 annually.”

    Doesn’t bother me much. I use perhaps 60L fuel in a year. TLW uses more, perhaps 500L. So, we’re not the average family. The kids however drive more and heat with natural gas. They can change. That’s what the tax is about. Electric cars are on the horizon.

  20. dougman says:

    Speaking of greening the land, insinuating the carbon tax in Canada is a great thing is foolhardy.

    Eh, Robert? Are you ready to pay more money as by 2022, when the federal $50 tax kicks in per tonne of carbon, the tax would cost the average Canadian household $2,568 annually.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IS1uRrsjvtQ

  21. dougman says:

    “In the next few years I intend to set up a small solar/wind farm on my property to do things like supply backup power, charge batteries, and perhaps charge my electric car”

    Jury rigging junk from Alibaba is not the path Robert.

    All your trees you planted will eventually grow-up, that’s if they even live, and overgrow your feeble devices.

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