Getting Older

“Last month, police started offering discounts for noodles at local restaurants to elderly citizens who agreed to hand in their driving licenses.The offer followed a series of deadly accidents involving elderly drivers — a growing problem in a country where 4.8 million people aged 75 or older hold a license.”
 
See Japanese city tags elderly dementia sufferers with barcodes
 
“Between 2010 and 2060, the percentage of Japanese citizens over the age of 75 will more than double from 11 per cent to 27 per cent, according to the government. The absolute number of old people will soon level off in Japan, but the proportion of the population who are young is declining rapidly: The percentage of Japanese younger than 19 years old, who constituted 40 per cent of the population in 1960, will decline to just 13 per cent in 2060. Japan’s total population peaked in 2010 at around 127 million people and has already begun to decline. In 2014, the country lost a record 268,000 people, as deaths continued to outstrip births.”
 
See Bold steps: Japan’s remedy for a rapidly aging society
An aging population is not only a Japanese problem but it is acute there. In Canada, “Baby Boomers” certainly created a blip in the demographics and we are just about all retired. I’ve really noticed that I’ve slowed down a lot in the last decade. It wasn’t long ago that I could hike 20 miles carrying a pack and a rifle in the wilderness or lift ~100 pound objects like boxes of chocolates. Now, it’s an effort to get out of my chair or to do chores in the yard. Forget mental arithmetic… Forget remembering everything…

Well, I’ve been told the secret to aging is to do it gracefully… I don’t know what that means. I still feel like a ten year old boy in an ancient body. Anyway, what I’ve lost in the ability to do, I’ve made up for by still being able to say and to imagine outrageous things. Just ask TLW. She’ll tell you I plant trees where they don’t belong or wear my clothes too long or… Still, I solve most of the problems I create unlike some people who just break things and move on. I actually make a few things and figure out ways to do difficult tasks like distributing the boulders TLW bought and dumped in my driveway. We positioned all but the largest using a chain-hoist and a cart that I built from scrap steel.

Anyway, I’m blessed. With my investments in my pension account doubling and redoubling, I should have some cash to spend my way, foolishly or not, and I may live long enough to pay off the last mortgage. Surely flowers and trees and bees will bless me all the days of my life.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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4 Responses to Getting Older

  1. dougman says:

    “It will take years to build up my clay into a sustainable orchard.”

    BOLLOCKS!

    I grew everything I did this year in sand…SAND! Building up soil is a old wives tales. Plants do not care what media they grow in, so long as they are fed routinely and properly with sunlight, water and nutrition. Since I am the steward to my garden, I picked a sunny spot which was easy enough. Used drip lines for water, and used a mixture of nutrients for a weekly feeding. I still have a freezer full of beans, corn, peppers and carrots. I even grew corn in pots full of sand and was blessed with one ear per plant.

    In your case, you could construct a few 18″ x 30′ beds with pressure treated 2×8’s, mix in 50% peat moss and 50% cement sand. Mix in some lime or gypsum, plant your seeds, water and feed it weekly and you are all set.

  2. dougman wrote, “I would not bet your life on your pension. You should have additional streams of income. Instead of planting trees, you could have tilled and cultivated the ground into multiple beds of high-rotation crops.”

    It will take years to build up my clay into a sustainable orchard. That was my plan years ago but several snowless winters killed all my grass. I have several pension streams and real estate. I’m OK compared to many. If the pension goes to nothing the world will be in bigger trouble than cash-flow.

  3. Wizard Emeritus says:

    Dougie:

    One can never be sure of anything these days, including all of the survivalist prep in the world. One bad stroke of personal luck, and all of your prep isn’t going to help you much.

  4. dougman says:

    “Anyway, I’m blessed. With my investments in my pension account doubling and redoubling, I should have some cash to spend my way, foolishly or not, and I may live long enough to pay off the last mortgage.”

    I would not bet your life on your pension. You should have additional streams of income. Instead of planting trees, you could have tilled and cultivated the ground into multiple beds of high-rotation crops.

    http://www.dallasnews.com/news/dallas-city-hall/2016/12/08/dallas-police-fire-pension-board-ends-run-bank-stops-154m-withdrawals

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