Yes! FLOSS Works In Education, Higher and Lower

“Proprietary applications such as computer-aided design software require time to gain purchasing approval and to integrate with classwork. And students can quickly fall behind the industry standard. “Our priority has always been graduating students ready for work,” he says.Open-source applications and platforms provide students instant access to the updated versions and new features. “Open source helps us prepare students for the cutting edge and can demonstrate to employers they are familiar with the latest technology”
 
See 6 colleges turning out open source talent
Chuckle. I’ve been harping on the advantages of FLOSS and GNU/Linux in K-12 schools for many years. It turns out the same advantages work for higher education (low cost, easy implementation, easy licensing…). I love it when I’m proven right again and again. It makes me proud and willing to make the effort to tell the story for many more years.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in Linux in Education, Teaching, technology and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

39 Responses to Yes! FLOSS Works In Education, Higher and Lower

  1. DrLoser wrote, “That’s not actually “teaching” in parallel, is it, Robert

    Such parallelism as you exhibited was “marking.””

    You bet it was teaching in parallel. Not only did I deal with students in person the usual way, students had text and images from Moodle to examine, read, take as assignments, and to respond so they could work at their own pace and even on more than one course at a time. Students who worked harder got more credits. I had some principals scold me about that but I just quoted the curriculum which explicitly stated the tech/career studies courses were set up that way so that teachers with expertise such as mine and students with motivation could do more in less time. I was working a lot harder and a lot smarter than many other teachers who did the one thing at a time routine while many students were bored out of their minds.

  2. DrLoser wrote, “You’ve never modified a single line of Moodle, have you?”

    Of course I have. One has to configure it after all. That configuration is partly in PHP files.

  3. Dr Loser says:

    No. More courses delivered simultaneously to the same class of 24-30 students. I often taught in modules of 0.2 course-credits so a student could pick any five modules for credit and I would offer more than a dozen modules which students could progress at their own rate. … I might give a brief lesson in person to each group or they could just take a list of tasks given by Moodle and we would record progress in Moodle or do assignments in Moodle.

    That’s not actually “teaching” in parallel, is it, Robert?

    Such parallelism as you exhibited was “marking.”

    Not even that, really, since Moodle does the marking for you. More like “collecting results.”

    You were essentially purposeless, weren’t you? A bot running from, say, Ottawa could have done your job for free.

  4. Dr Loser says:

    I’ve modified/replaced/inserted many thousands of lines of code all over the world.

    You’ll no doubt be able to point us at the change numbers, then.

    Anyway, that is beside the point. You’ve never modified a single line of Moodle, have you?

  5. Deaf Spy wrote, “Apart for compiling your own kernel, have you ever examined the source and successfully modified to your personal needs any other third-party system?”

    Chuckle. I used to do that for a living. I’ve modified/replaced/inserted many thousands of lines of code all over the world. I have examined Linux code to understand particular bugs/problems/behaviours like USB renaming interfaces on static electric discharges up North. The idea of the developers was that when something is plugged in it needs to be named/identified. The driver considered a static discharge a disconnection/reconnection, messing up my multiheaded X configurations.

  6. Deaf Spy says:

    Robert, have you ever modified Moodle with various custom plug-ins?

    Simple answer required: Yes or No.

  7. oiaohm wrote, “Correctly done Moodle gives very few problems.”

    That’s been my experience. Moodle never gave me any real problems. It just worked for us. There is a lively community of users who are teachers wanting it to work for them so it’s understandable it would work for teachers. M$’s OS on the other hand was designed by salesmen so it doesn’t work very well for many users.

  8. oiaohm says:

    1. Consultant installs Moodle.
    2. Consultant modifies Moodle with various custom plug-ins.
    3. Customer uses apt-get — it really isn’t magic, you know: a child can follow the theory, though not perhaps deal with the results.
    4. Customer discovers that the consultant version of Moodle is thoroughly trashed.

    Dr Loser really. This shows not knowing problem.

    How did Consultant install Moodle is first question.
    https://docs.moodle.org/29/en/Installing_Moodle_on_Debian_based_distributions
    I guess following instructions correctly if not there is a cause.
    Note that on a secure production server, you will want to create a different user than root to access the database.
    This line is fatal if you miss it and don’t obey. Why root user password on database at different times is cleared when they are upgraded by different Linux Distributions including debian. Yes don’t use “root” username to access a database unless you want failures. Root user on databases is administration user not application user so should be resettable at any time without any effect if correctly deploying. This is a trap that a new users fall for. Of course root user password reset does not mean the moodle data is trashed just its not accessable due to password being wrong.

    Next what plugins. Plugins sticking only to approved Moodle functions.
    Interesting point at this point when you run apt-get following moodle.org install instructions moodle and its plugins are left untouched and working. So not Thoroughly trashed.

    Even using the debian included Moodle disaster you describe is purely dependent on a bad moodle plugin or someone did not following install instructions to the letter(this case required disobeying package). Yes Moodle package in debian will ask you to create a moodle user in the database so avoiding the root user issue.

    Yes there are little thing to using Linux correctly. Correctly done Moodle gives very few problems. Incorrectly installed Moodle will cause some head aches. Anything incorrectly installed will cause some problems. Adding poor plugins to MS Office equal it not working correctly either including not opening after applying Service Packs. So bad plugin is not a Moodle only thing. The not use ‘root’ username applies to everything on Linux using databases so not something Moodle special.

  9. Deaf Spy says:

    The Doctor’s summary is quite precise.

    Robert, admit it. You’ve never modified Moodle with various custom plug-ins, haven’t you?

    Apart for compiling your own kernel, have you ever examined the source and successfully modified to your personal needs any other third-party system?

  10. DrLoser wrote, “So, little or no personal contact with your students, Robert?”

    No. More courses delivered simultaneously to the same class of 24-30 students. I often taught in modules of 0.2 course-credits so a student could pick any five modules for credit and I would offer more than a dozen modules which students could progress at their own rate. e.g. I might have a bunch working on keyboarding, a bunch working on HTML, a bunch on programming in PASCAL and another bunch working on networking. I might give a brief lesson in person to each group or they could just take a list of tasks given by Moodle and we would record progress in Moodle or do assignments in Moodle. At any time a student could get a spreadsheet with marks, progress, and credits, all ready to merge into the school’s system whatever that might be. Several schools automated scheduling, or grading or attendance but none automated everything. It just wasn’t necessary in such small schools.

  11. luvr says:

    Dr Loser, apparently trying to make us all believe that we are even more silly than he wants us to think he is, pretends to be unable to see any relevance to the subject at hand.

    Yes, I get it… You’re deliberately acting this dense.
    Well, whatever tickles your fancy.

  12. Dr Loser says:

    I suppose you can get yourself into such a type of mess with Moodle, alright, but it seems to me that you have never done any development under Oracle Applications, and then attempted to upgrade the Oracle system to the next version.

    I’m willing to bet that you’ve never dated a Formula 1 driver either, Luvr. Do share the intimate details if you have.

    Neither your pitiful comment nor my jocular riposte has any relevance to the subject at hand, does it?

  13. Dr Loser says:

    How is that relevant to anything? I suspect folks who do that can handle it or they would not have done it in the first place. Moodle is very usable as issued IMHO.

    Your humble — or insert alternative adjective here — opinion is not relevant in this instance, Robert.

    1. Consultant installs Moodle.
    2. Consultant modifies Moodle with various custom plug-ins.
    3. Customer uses apt-get — it really isn’t magic, you know: a child can follow the theory, though not perhaps deal with the results.
    4. Customer discovers that the consultant version of Moodle is thoroughly trashed.

    Deaf Spy can correct me on my very simplistic extrapolation of what happened, but I think this is a reasonable precis. And given that precis, the question of whether you have ever modified Moodle is very relevant indeed.

    Why don’t you just answer the question honestly, Robert? No weaseling. Just admit that you did not, because you did not feel the need.

    This is a perfectly logical and admirable position, and it would become you to stake it out.

    Unfortunately your noddy little needs do not scale, Robert. Not with Moodle, not with anything in IT.

    And when it comes to scaling, your pitiful little nostrums about “examining the code” and “apt-get” are very slightly more worthless than a Confederate Dollar printed in Upstate New York circa 1859.

  14. luvr says:

    Deaf Spy said, “You are not paying attention, are you? How many times you have created plugins for Moodle? How many times they got broken when you upgrade to the next version? How many times you have made changes in the codebase of Moodle?”

    I suppose you can get yourself into such a type of mess with Moodle, alright, but it seems to me that you have never done any development under Oracle Applications, and then attempted to upgrade the Oracle system to the next version. The number of breakages that you risk having to repair is not exactly my idea of having fun…

  15. Dr Loser says:

    It [Moodle] allowed me to teach several times as many courses simultaneously and it was valuable to my employer. I’ve been there and done that.

    So, little or no personal contact with your students, Robert? Or perhaps Moodle allowed you to clone yourself “several times.”

    Now, with a certain type of inadequate teacher who only reached the profession in the twilight of his or her working life, after leading a rich and no doubt productive existence with at least three separate careers behind him or her, I can easily see how the students would benefit from barely having any one-to-one contact with the instructor at all.

    But surely, not in your case, Robert.

  16. oiaohm says:

    You are not paying attention, are you? How many times you have created plugins for Moodle? How many times they got broken when you upgrade to the next version? How many times you have made changes in the codebase of Moodle?
    Deaf Spy what you have going after does not show don’t know the problem.
    https://docs.moodle.org/dev/Core_APIs
    Moodle has documented Core APIs. Interesting enough these are perfectly ABI/API stable across versions. All Moodle plugins that break have 1 of two things in common.
    1) Doing something new version of PHP no longer accepts due to security reasons so this failure does not align with Moodle versions.
    2) Using undocumented API/ABI of Moodle so snap when version changes.

    Using undocumented API/ABI under windows or anything else is path to disaster so Moodle here is not a special case.

    One of the problems with FOSS is it simpler to see the undocumented/internal only functions and be tempted to use them when you should not as a programmer.

    This is just a case of picking out something that it does not matter if it FOSS or not if you do X class of action you will cause yourself X class of problem. This case X problem is using undocumented/internal only functions and the X class of problem is always that item breaks some point in future when version changes.

    How many times you have made changes in the codebase of Moodle?
    In fact this is a common mistake. If you make a change to a core of a project down stream and don’t push it upstream you will be stuck with the maintenance problem and run into issues. So if you are just writing addons to Moodle you should not alter the Moodle code base as all. If you are Modifying Moodle you are Modifying Moodle so should be sending it upstream to make sure you have not done anything stupid or causing yourself other nightmares due to your version no longer being aligned with everyone elses end of story.

    Basically this one is just because you can does not mean you should. If you do you get punished by the after effects. Most of the Australian states education systems using Moodle have an approved plugin list and approval process result they have absolutely no problem with Moodle others complain about. Yes the approved Moodle plugin process is simply check does plugin only use documented functions for plugins to use if yes approved if no rejected.

  17. Deaf Spy wrote, ” How many times you have created plugins for Moodle? How many times they got broken when you upgrade to the next version? How many times you have made changes in the codebase of Moodle?”

    How is that relevant to anything? I suspect folks who do that can handle it or they would not have done it in the first place. Moodle is very usable as issued IMHO.

  18. Deaf Spy says:

    Chuckle. I don’t know how many times I installed Moodle but …

    You are not paying attention, are you? How many times you have created plugins for Moodle? How many times they got broken when you upgrade to the next version? How many times you have made changes in the codebase of Moodle?

  19. Deaf Spy says:

    five minutes to create lists versus hundreds of hours of planning

    And how do you come with this metrics, Robert? By looking at the ceiling on a rainy Sunday afternoon?

    I don’t care what your school should pay. Or not. What I care is what my university did pay, and what it got, or, better, what it didn’t get. Because of a greedy FLOSS lunatic with zero experience in administration and e-Learning.

  20. Deaf Spy wrote, ” that other system automatically created accounts for all students and automatically assigned them to the e-courses based on their curriculum. I just had to update the course materials and homework assignments.”

    Let’s see: five minutes to create lists versus hundreds of hours of planning, grading and giving feedback… You think my school should pay $thousands to create a few lists? There’s a thing called “registration” at most K-12 schools where I worked. Lists are tabulated and you’re done. That’s on/before day One of teaching. No software application is going to interview those students and parents and sign off on the paper docs. Now, I know schools can be paperless but I never taught in one that was and there’s still the interactions with warm bodies, not bits…

  21. Deaf Spy wrote, “you’ve never done that”.

    Chuckle. I don’t know how many times I installed Moodle but until recently it was on Beast who went wherever I did and I used it in all the schools where I taught multiple courses. I used it as a classroom management, teaching, evaluation, and planning tool. Students and parents loved it. I never had any difficulty getting it to work for us. It allowed me to teach several times as many courses simultaneously and it was valuable to my employer. I’ve been there and done that.

  22. Deaf Spy says:

    Apt-get update;apt-get upgrade or just copying the latest version of Moodle is much less costly.

    You forgot to mention what happens with all my custom plug-ins. Or custom changes in the code that didn’t got into the project trunk.

    Of course, you’ve never done that. You just preach about things you have no clue about whatsoever.

  23. Deaf Spy says:

    Further, for “tight integration”, you get lock-in and increased costs when migrating to a new system. You should consider the 50K as just a down payment on the treadmill whereas Moodle gives you total control of software and data

    Bwaha-ha-ha-ha!

    Yes, I have total control over software and data. I have total control to create arcane filters in one obscure system, export data into CSV, and import it into Moodle, then fine-tune the details, then export the results back, and do this every semester, for every course I do. Really productive thing, I tell you. Because, you know, a teacher’s job is to hang around CSV files. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt, thanks for the fish and farewell.

    At the same time, that other system automatically created accounts for all students and automatically assigned them to the e-courses based on their curriculum. I just had to update the course materials and homework assignments. No transfer of data to and through. No need to manually export and re-import, and handle manual amends in case of changes during the course of the semester.

    I don’t even hope you will understand. You don’t consider your labor worth a coin.

  24. Deaf Spy says:

    Nonsense. I didn’t spend 150K on Moodle.

    I don’t care what money your spent, Robert. I quote a real project that got as wrong as possible, and where FLOSS didn’t save anything. Here is even the reference number for the project (BG051PO001-4.3.04-0064) under which all the money were trashed.

  25. Deaf Spy wrote, “Spent 150K EUR for a bunch of half-assed products that solved individual issues and can’t even properly exchange data. Setup Moodle.”

    Nonsense. I didn’t spend 150K on Moodle. No way. It installed in a few minutes and could export CSV of grades, students and courses. I could merge that directly with templates for report-cards.

    Further, for “tight integration”, you get lock-in and increased costs when migrating to a new system. You should consider the 50K as just a down payment on the treadmill whereas Moodle gives you total control of software and data. I’ve seen tightly integrated systems that would not permit an upgrade to the current version. We had to update to all the intermediate versions we had skipped. So, a simple upgrade became a long weekend of paying and installing each missed upgrade. Apt-get update;apt-get upgrade or just copying the latest version of Moodle is much less costly.

  26. Deaf Spy says:

    A Robert’s wall of text, concluded with:

    Yes, FLOSS is much more efficient and effective than systems that don’t work.

    Robert, everything that does ε amount of work is more efficient than systems that don’t work. By definition.

    Moodle is ok, but totally lacking when compared to commercial, well-integrated products.

    Again, I gave a real-life example of FLOSS zealotry (combined with greediness) that:
    I. Saved 50K EUR for a system that could automate the whole process of student administration from admission to diploma and integrated very tightly with the e-Learning system, including e-Testing. This tight integration was the real added value.
    II. Spent 150K EUR for a bunch of half-assed products that solved individual issues and can’t even properly exchange data. Setup Moodle.

    So, instead of buying something that works (proved in other Universities), they spent three times the money for something that basically doesn’t and you have to do everything manually in Moodle.

  27. Deaf Spy wrote, “In Russia and the ex-Warsaw-block countries, “Informatics” was the name of Computer sciences.”

    Here, it’s a broader category including information processing, generally all things involving information technology that is the least bit automated. It’s a kluge between the words “information” and “automatic” and it’s plural because it’s a wide field. See Wikipedia

    In such an umbrella, I taught subjects as diverse as office automation, the paperless office, creation, presentation, storage and search for information and documents, as well as automation of almost everything done in schools except physed and welding. I enjoyed teaching because I could teach the same thing a dozen different ways and never be bored. When I became a computer teacher I could reach the horizon of 1:1 computer:student ratio which makes much more possible. A combination of FLOSS, GNU/Linux, PCs and servers on a snappy LAN is a powerful tool for education. Don’t diss folks who use it unless you’ve tried it yourself. OTOH, I’ve seen very expensive non-FLOSS systems fail repeatedly. In one school the seller would not even help install the product for which my school paid until I installed the FLOSS equivalent. In another, students learned that by random typing they could achieve the “goals” of the teaching system with zero effort on their part despite ~$100 per student per annum being paid. In another, someone had run off with “the key” and the school’s $4K teaching system would no longer work without paying again. Yes, FLOSS is much more efficient and effective than systems that don’t work.

  28. Deaf Spy wrote, ” How can you call a job excellent for a tractor when it didn’t survive a whole season without need of repairs at the end?”

    Uh, rocks? You can’t hit a rock really solidly at high speed and expect invincibility. The rock broke in two as did one of the tiller’s tines. It’s a five-minute job to set up and weld the parts back together. The machine did an excellent job because you see no or sparsely spaced weeds in the areas cultivated with it compared to the other areas that are infested. That inspires confidence and satisfaction. The kinds of weeds that trouble us most are dandelions and quack-grass. They both have very persistent roots and this thing digs them up, shreds them and leaves them to dry in the sun, a very satisfactory outcome.

    Another repair is fixing the charging system. I had no wiring diagram or manual when I put it together and it apparently did not keep the battery topped up and the ammeter showed nothing so I will have to diagnose that. Otherwise the machine is just fine except that the strut of the seat can’t support my weight. Since I am obese, I would not hold that against the machine. I expect most Chinese would not have had that problem, although with prosperity and urbanization the Chinese are growing more obese but urbanites are not the folks using such equipment.

  29. Deaf Spy wrote, “Really efficient.”

    Yes, I’ve used Moodle. It is very efficient and I had no trouble with it teaching a dozen courses at once, giving students prompt feedback on their work and reporting grades to the students, parents and staff. Several large and important organizations use Moodle for all kinds of good reasons. Certainly it is possible that some installation is poorly done, implemented or maintained but the core application worked well for me.

  30. Deaf Spy says:

    Sabine is clearly an expensive waste of space.

    Yeah, we have some of these at the university I teach at. A very special moron, who rejected an offer for 50K euro for a well-integrated system that manages student administration and provides e-Services to students, including a good set of e-Learning tools.

    The moron in question spent 150K Eur to patch together some “free” tools (like Moodle), and the result is:
    1. Student administration are empty-handed, and keep using their legacy system.
    2. A bunch of software pieces that automate individual tasks and can’t quite exchange data.
    3. For students and teachers: Moodle.

    Really efficient.

  31. Deaf Spy says:

    I will make a couple of repairs this week and fire it up shortly. It did an excellent job

    Hm. How can you call a job excellent for a tractor when it didn’t survive a whole season without need of repairs at the end? Gees, even a Russian rototiller would have done better (I speak from experience), and Russians are notorious for being unable to produce any operational and efficient machine.

  32. Deaf Spy says:

    What, precisely, is “Informatics?”

    Let me contribute, dear Doctor. In Russia and the ex-Warsaw-block countries, “Informatics” was the name of Computer sciences. Bulgaria was one of the countries bestowed by Comecon to develop computer technologies and, hence, sciences. Why name is Informatics (Информатика in Bulgaria) is totally beyond me, but that is the way it is.

  33. DrLoser wrote, “How’s your tin-pot toy Chinese tractor going, btw?”

    I will make a couple of repairs this week and fire it up shortly. It did an excellent job last year and I expect it will do so again. There are very few weeds surviving in the areas tilled last year. The thing is made of steel mostly.

  34. Dr Loser says:

    How’s your tin-pot toy Chinese tractor going, btw?

  35. Dr Loser says:

    Perhaps if he [Dr Loser] knows nothing he should write nothing.

    Perhaps, if you cannot be bothered to check out the resumes of the six academics upon whose testimony your thesis relies, Robert, you should just not bother to post. There are obviously many other subjects, possibly one that you are tangentially acquainted with, that demand your attention.

    Do please note that one of the academics in your post (Joshua Pearce of Michigan Tech) has my whole-hearted admiration and support. Unlike you, I am not a simple-minded buffoon who spots a key-word like “FLOSS” and then proceeds to ignore any other available evidence.

    Mind you, that’s what you do every single time, so I can’t fault you for consistency, Pog.

    Now, once again. Feel free to consult the 1832 edition of Websters.

    What, precisely, is “Informatics?”

    As a bonus question, how would “Informatics” benefit FLOSS?

  36. Dr Loser wrote alot saying little. e.g. “instructors are very important.
     
    As, presumably, is Informatics.
     
    Whatever that might be.”

    Perhaps if he knows nothing he should write nothing. The point of my post was that FLOSS works for education while non-free software imposes burdens and adds little. These folks did something good for students rather than just offering some businesses $free training sessions. Educators don’t work for purveyors of non-free software. If you want training done you should pay for it. If students want to pay these folks for educational experiences, it’s all good.

    Perhaps I should explain the difference between training and education. I studied welding, not operation/use of certain companies’ products. As a result, I can use standard welding processes using any and all types of equipment. I got an education. Meanwhile, some business could seek to hire N welders skilled in the use of such and such machinery/processes. They may or may not find enough locally so they have to choose to train otherwise skilled people. Most businesses are smarter. They advertise for educated/skilled people and give them a minimal introduction and turn them loose. Having an educated workforce is a wonderful thing compared to have to constantly fire/hire people with each change of environment. Indeed, training folks to use version X of company Y’s stuff is a huge waste of time compared to having educated workers who understand basic principles with universal application. FLOSS by its nature allows folks to examine the code or otherwise explore the software flexibly. That leads to many educational experiences. e.g. someone trained to use M$’s office suite may be utterly paralyzed by LibreOffice, whereas a student who has used several FLOSS office suites/application will be OK. e.g. I and several others were proficient with Office XP, OpenOffice.org, AbiWord, KWord etc, but I could not find anyone in the building who could run M$’s 2007 office suite. M$ and others’ lock-ins are counter-educational, as are onerous prices, and restrictive licences.

  37. Dr Loser says:

    It’s actually very interesting to see a small sample of academia that demonstrates quite how easy it is for completely worthless dingbats to travel on the coat-tails of FLOSS and earn themselves a decent crust.

    Interesting, and rather depressing.

    Of these six, I would suggest that Joshua Pearce sounds like a possible future Head of Department and a man I would probably pay $100,000 per annum to, right now.

    The other five? They sound suspiciously like the hobos down by the Cal-Pacific track I used to hang out with when I lived in Sunnyvale.

    One or two of them might have some promise. But, basically, they’re just FLOSS apparatchniks, aren’t they?

    Feel free to defend a single one of them. And note that I did, at least, put the effort in to check their resumes. You, Pog, did not.

  38. Dr Loser says:

    It makes me proud and willing to make the effort to tell the story for many more years.

    What effort, Pog? By now you should have a nice little database of cut’n’paste quotes and a Pascal-driven robo-application that just bangs those suckers in every second post or so.

    Anyhow, to your cite. It starts off well. NYIT and RIT are reputable second-league schools.

    1) NYIT is represented by Richard Simpson, an “Associate Professor.” You don’t need me to tell you that this means that Mr Simpson has no real power at all.

    For instance, a recent class developed a job search application with open-source tools such as the Eclipse and NetBeans integrated development environments and managed and synchronized their code development using GitHub.

    Ooh-er, Missus. I do not see this as a valuable asset on a student portfolio. I could do it on my own in two days, using nothing more sophisticated than Python, Beautiful Soup, and a few templates for something like Django. All the rest of those “tools” are irrelevant, because any half-way decent grad will pick them up on day one at the job.

    2) RIT is represented by Stephen Jacobs, who looks like a more cheerful version of yourself in a very silly hat. His course gets you a minor. It does not appear to offer any other benefit.

    At the end of the day, open source in and of itself is about process and community, not about specific technical skills

    And which forward-looking student would sign on to an IT course at a reputable college because they don’t want to learn specific technical skills?

    Ho ho.

    3) The Michigan Tech guy (Joshua Pearce) seems to be on to something. He makes a whole lot more sense than the other two. Plus, he has local industry connections.

    I like this guy.

    4) And … back to Purdue. Sabine Brunswicker, Associate professor for Innovation.

    Sabine is clearly an expensive waste of space.

    5) Western New England Uni features Heidi. Heidi appears to be just as unqualified for her position as you were at Easterville. She doesn’t seem to do much but attempt to keep her class sizes down:

    She teaches students the importance of soft skills such as business and process in the world of open source, helping them navigate tricky aspects of the coding world, including proving your abilities.

    This is more of an Outward-Bound course than a College Education, isn’t it?

    6) SUNY at Albany. Well, it’s not Rensselaer, but it’s close. What it’s doing with Patrick Masson, instructor in Informatics, is anybody’s guess.

    Still, instructors are very important.

    As, presumably, is Informatics.

    Whatever that might be.

  39. ram says:

    All the Linux based media creation workstations I’ve sold to universities are still in nearly 24/7 use ten years later. Try doing that with proprietary software. Hardware designed for Linux, such as boxen by Shuttle, also run cool and hence are long lived.

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