FLOSS And European Governments

“The French Parliament has last week approved a first draft law for a Digital Republic, which encourages the use of free software by the country’s public administrations. The Assembly (France’s lower house) rejected calls by proponents to make free software mandatory. However, the draft Digital Law does consider source code of software developed by or for public administrations to be public information, which should be made available on request.”
 
See France Assembly encourages use of free software
While the idea of making FLOSS mandatory went down the drain in France, it’s huge progress that the idea was even conceived and considered. Likely the only reason that requirement was rejected was the fear that certain applications would not be available as FLOSS. It’s time the tail quit wagging the dog.

Governments, if you quit buying their stuff, the “Independent Software Vendors” will make what you want. Don’t enable their monopolistic practices. Encourage competition in the market by using FLOSS. Make vendors compete on merits not marketing machinations.

Over all of Europe, the concept of FLOSS has reached the frontal lobes. The European Parliament is also recommending FLOSS.

Big ideas take some time to be absorbed. At least FLOSS has a foot in the door instead of being locked out as M$ and “partners” designed so long ago.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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37 Responses to FLOSS And European Governments

  1. DrLoser says:

    By he way, Kurks — QEMU doesn’t really qualify as a VM.

    I’ll leave you to work out why.

  2. DrLoser says:

    Android doesn’t do virtualization ti on because it’s a mobile OS and nobody cares about that.

    Ah, but the point is that Mr Pogson does care, or at least he would care if he stopped being evasive and started being honest with himself.

    A pervasive meme across the many threads of this blog is that “small smart multicore ARM thingies” are on the cusp of being “desktop ready.” Occasionally there is the suggestion that they are even “server ready.”

    This is all very well and good, but it ignores the question of how you get the relevant OS onto the machine in the first place. I see three possible options:

    1) You could chroot to the OS of choice. I’m not actually sure that a “small smart thingie SysAdmin” has the necessary privileges to do this. And if so, I presume that one would need to download the OS of choice from the Store — the sort of Walled Garden that FLOSS fans used to abhor, before St Google came up with one. I suppose you could side-load it in some way. And the result would be — tada! — chroot, which has generally proven unsatisfactory in more traditional desktop environments.
    2) You could brick the small smart thingie and void the warranty. I can’t see this approach having general appeal.
    3) You could acquire VM technology that works on your small smart thingie. If available, I would suggest that this would be the way to go. You get perhaps a 3% loss in oomph, but that cost is offset by reliability and practicality and, what do you know, you even get to play with different versions of Debian and Ubuntu and I suppose you could add FreeBSD in, should you so wish.

    I’d see option (3) as the only one that would appeal to a mass market. Unfortunately, nobody here has yet explained how it might possibly work.

    I live in hope.

  3. kurkosdr says:

    Android doesn’t do virtualization ti on because it’s a mobile OS and nobody cares about that. Google has more important things to fix.

    Two emulation – based Virtual Machines are listed below in a post of mine.

    It’s amazing how Pog’s tries to derail an already concluded discussion.

  4. DrLoser says:

    Certainly. You can run GNU/Linux on an Android/Linux tablet …

    I note, in passing, that you are explicity abandoning your spurious claim that Android is “Gnu/Linux/Android.” Because, if it was, you wouldn’t need to “run” Gnu/Linux on it, would you?

    My question does not involve the bricking of an Android tablet with a Linux Desktop image.

    My question presupposes that the Android tablet in question remains an Android tablet.

    Now then. I’m delighted to see that you acknowledge that your earlier effort re Virtual Machines was nothing but a pointless evasion, Robert. I invite you to be honest once again, and to admit that bricking an Android tablet is not relevant to this question.

    Can you install some sort of OS VM on an Android tablet, or not?

  5. DrLoser wrote, “Can you run Xen on an Android tablet?”

    Certainly. You can run GNU/Linux on an Android/Linux tablet and install Xen. e.g. See Debian’s package.

    A lot can happen when you are not restricted to non-Free software.

  6. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser really you don’t know anything about this topic particularly when it relates to android.

    The development kit for android uses QEMU…

    Fifi really you don’t know anything about how to read a simple question posed in relatively straight-forward English.

    Really you don’t know anything about how to address such a question politely.

    Really you don’t know anything about how to answer it.

    Really you don’t know anything.

    I don’t actually care how Android, or Android apps, are developed. Clearly my (honest) question was not asked out of any interest in how to develop such, via QEMU or any other emulator.

    You can run Xen on a Windows PC.

    Can you run Xen on an Android tablet?

    Have I reduced this not very complex question to a form that is so trivially simple that even you, Fifi, can attempt to answer it without falling off a tangential cliff of your own device?

  7. Deaf Spy says:

    The development kit for android uses QEMU.

    Hey, are you not the illiterate, fraudulent, net-stockings-wearing and brains-maggot-infested fellow named Fifi?

    Come back when you realize how writeln() works, little one.

  8. kurkosdr says:

    (i mean, why does your company wants clients to pay in anonymous bitcoin?)

  9. kurkosdr says:

    Re: conversion process?? Obviously you don;t know much about Bitcoin, as there is no need to convert. I have a shift card..https://www.shiftpayments.com/

    1) Some of your clients won’t have bitcoin and will have to convert from USD to BTC, which of course happens using some service, with them keeping a fee hidden in the exchange rate

    2) Shift card charges you to convert from BTC to USD (you don’t really believe it’s free, right?) hidden in the exchange rate

    But anyway, let’s assume for a second there are no fees. At all. The exchange rate of BTC varies widely even over the week, to the degree that using web startup stocks to trade with one another looks like a more stable “currency”.

    There is a very good reason nobody sells anything in Bitcoin. It would be insanity to do it, as you ‘d have to readjust your prices every day. What they do is charge in dollars or euros, and they “accept” payment in bitcoin at the current exchange rate. Which means the dollar/euro price for the same product stays pretty the same while the price for bitcoin does not. Such stable currency.

    Bitcoin is useful only as an:
    -investment (much like playing on the stock market)
    -anonymous payments.

    Which brings us to the question by our friend DrLoser. What part of the services you mentioned warrants the price you mentioned? Does your “company” happen to own an RV with lots of “glassware” in it, with a cancer-patient chemist with a shaved head (driving a Pontiac Aztek) in it?

  10. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser really you don’t know anything about this topic particularly when it relates to android.

    The development kit for android uses QEMU. If you don’t care about performance running under x86 images from the development kit under XEN or KVM are no major issue. The OS knowledge is in QEMU that is shared between XEN and KVM.

    Performance issue is lack of decent GPU pass-through but that issue is reducing.

    http://www.osboxes.org/android-x86/ Yes you can down load prebuilt images for virtualbox and vmware to run Android in them.

    DrLoser the fact the Android SDK uses a virtual machine called QEMU means there is no question that android can run in virtual OS machine. Only a person who has no clue on the topic would raise what you did.

    Outstanding question is how good can Android work in a Virtual machine. Other than GPU issue very decently.

    Complete source code to kernel used in the SDK is way more than enough to make it work in a Virtual machine.

    Yes Linux KVM support is used in the Android development kit. So google provided android images running in a Linux kernel hyper-visor KVM is standard operation.

    Last I heard, Android was a VM
    This is so far correct its not funny. Stock Reference Development Android is Virtual Machine images.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Run-Windows-XP-on-Android-Device/

    Bochs virtual machine does work on Android but its not know for speed because its a software based virtual machine.

    I am not at all sure that Google offers enough access to the details of the underlying OS.
    Beast like Bochs does not need very much details from the underlying OS. This is a question do you care about performance. Even QEMU has a full software mode so can be run on top of Android.

    To use KVM feature in Linux kernel requires more privilege than what Android Applications installed by the Google store can request. Yes QEMU using KVM on Android requires getting root privileges on the device to install something at higher permissions than Android normally allows.

    Details about the Guest OS you are attempt to hyper-vise is heavily shared between virtual machine projects. Even details about how to use Host OS acceleration is heavily shared between virtual machine project. Perform is more will application have enough privilege that the Host OS allows it and that the hardware features exist/enabled to be used.

    Heck DrLoser there is a javascript x86 virtual machine that runs in web browsers. Basically if you don’t care about performance the HOST OS to the virtual machine means nothing.

    Virtual Machines installing special drivers into Guest OS is not about that they have to as most Virtual Machines have enough hardware emulation that the GUEST OS will run but about reducing overhead to so GUEST OS and HOST OS perform better.

    Level of detail you need to know about the OS being hypervise if you don’t care about performance is quite low really. In fact details and privilege HOST OS is more important to performance than details about the Guest OS.

    Android image in a Virtual machine will perform quite well. Android as Host OS unless the device is has been modified to get privilege performance will be poor. Linux kernel Android devices use provide features the virtual machine software like qemu-kvm needs to perform well problem is lack of root user privilege to enable and configure.

    Both bochs and qemu currently run on Android in software mode. Hardware acceleration features being missing.

    But the thing about Xen — and as far as I am aware, other Hypervisors — is that it requires a considerable amount of access to the details of the OS that you are trying to … hypervise. (Ugly word, that.)
    Something DrLoser the idiot is not aware normally the first time a Guest OS is attempted to be used under Xen, Qemu … nothing about the Guest OS is known. Funny enough the track record is 85% of the time the OS just plain up works. Ok under performing but works.

    The information about the Host OS in a Virtual Machine is mostly about how can we alter the Virtual Machine behavior to trick a bit more speed out the Guest OS. Mostly were can we not copy how real hardware works and take a short path.

    http://www.linux-kvm.org/page/Guest_Support_Status
    Only thing required to get Windows 10 to work with kvm and xen turn out lie about CPU. Most cases to make a Guest OS work in a hypervisor or virtual machine is tweak what hardware the hypervisor or virtual machine reports. This is not knowing that much about the Guest OS at all. Basically what hardware does the Guest OS like and that is mostly end of questions unless you care about performance. Performance is normally not about the Guest OS or at least not about the Guest OS as main problem. Like does the Host OS and hardware give you access to hardware to accelerate the virtual machine functionality.

    Before hardware assisted visualization Xen did paravirtualisation that required a lot of Guest OS information because that was modifying the guest OS to run as ring 1 instead of ring 0 modern hardware allows you to lie to the guest OS that it has ring 0 when it does not so that super huge work around is not required that much any more.

    Yes Microsoft prevented in XP time frame Xen paravirtualisation drivers from being released that replaced memory management and other core things to allow windows to run as ring 1. Level of guest OS knowledge required to virtual machine with performance has been dropping ever since VT cpu extensions have appeared. VT-g stuff would drop it even more once all video cards support it. Moving a OS with paravirtualisaiton drives to ring 1 in fact performs no better than using VT extensions to allow guest OS believe it has a Ring 0 when it does not.

    VT-g support means your standard video drivers on the OS on real hardware or virtual machine can be absolutely identical. Network offloading/accelerator cards also results in a bit of real world hardware that a real hardware OS talked to in ways that a virtual machine setup want to reduce overhead.

    So the difference between being in a virtual machine and not in a virtual machine is progressively reducing.

  11. kurkosdr says:

    @DrLoser,

    I know you have already found at least 2 Android virtual machine apps, you are just testing if Pog can find them too. Com’ on, admit it you little brat…

    (if I can find them, you can too)
    http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/tablets-in-the-enterprise/how-to-run-legacy-windows-with-limbo-for-android/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1tf6s6P-5E
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.litchie.aemula4droid

    Of course, those are pure-emulation virtual machines, like DOSBox. Now on the hypervisor thing, I don’t think a mobile-first OS (like Android) is obligated to have them. If Google wanted that feature, they ‘d have to publish the APIs, polish them and document them. That is… shall I say, out-of-scope for a mobile-first OS. It’s like asking for ACLs in an MP3 player. Google have more important things to fix in Android, like bluetooth audio not glitching all the time. Or the wireless keyboard of their own Pixel C not losing key presses.

  12. DrLoser says:

    I hope that the following will not anchor anyone who is prepared to discuss the idea of building a virtual Operating System machine — henceforth vOSm, to avoid confusion — above an Android (etc etc) platform. But, now I come to think about it, there is at least one requirement to be met before you can do such a thing.

    Let’s take the Xen Hypervisor as an example. Substitute others if you wish — as a Cambridge graduate at roughly the time Xen was being developed, I am fond of the thing. So I’m going with Xen.

    Now, I might be fond of it, and I might have tried several times to build an operational version of it, but I’m going to admit that I have failed every single time. Partly ignorance. Partly lack of resources. Partly the fact that I was working with experimental versions of Xen.

    But the thing about Xen — and as far as I am aware, other Hypervisors — is that it requires a considerable amount of access to the details of the OS that you are trying to … hypervise. (Ugly word, that.)

    And this brings me back to Android. Because, and I would be delighted to be contradicted on this point … I am not at all sure that Google offers enough access to the details of the underlying OS.

    Quite interesting in a way. One could reasonably use the presence of one or more vOSms as an indication that — whether or not you can download it — the Android OS can properly be considered to be FLOSS.

  13. DrLoser says:

    Why would anyone hire a minimum wage chump for IT work? Unless they don’t care about their data, LAN/WAN, software and hardware.

    Presumably because they quite correctly assume that a minimum wage chump working with IT would cause far less damage than you would, Dog-Brain. For example, very few minimum wage chumps would have the chutzpah to throw away installation media for no reason at all other than personal bias.

    But that wasn’t actually the question. The question is this. You are trying to differentiate yourself from a minimum wage chump by claiming that you have what amount to begging letters that offer you circa $125 per hour for unspecified IT work.

    That, if I may say so, is an abnormally high rate on offer. I can quite see how you (or me or anyone) would set our fee at that rate, but then, as you would know if only you were in possession of an HSE, macroeconomic theory demands that markets clear, and the two sides of the negotiation necessarily converge.

    In your case I would be extremely surprised to see the convergence point at anything much above minimum wage. And of course I am entirely wrong. And of course you can give us all a valuable precis of your “$125 per hour” fruitfulness.

    We eagerly await such a precis, Dog-Brain.

  14. DrLoser says:

    Last I heard, Android was a VM

    You are being deliberately obtuse, Robert — I suspect, in order to be evasive.

    By “Virtual Machine” I am clearly referring to Xen, VirtualBox, VMWare, and the like.

    The fact that the term has a dual meaning — IT is rife with a poverty of imagination when it comes to new categorical terms, don’t you agree? — is irrelevant. I am clearly not talking about the Dalvik virtual machine. Nor the Java virtual machine. Nor the MSIL virtual machine. Nor, indeed, the UCSD p-System virtual machine, of which I assume you have very fond memories indeed.

    Well, I assume that. I’m assuming that, as a professional programmer whose language of choice is and always has been Pascal, you were exposed to the p-System at some point, Robert?

    No matter. I am talking about virtual OS machines and you darned well know that I am talking about virtual OS machines.

    And I have a genuine, honest, desire to know whether or not an Android (etc etc) device can run a virtual OS machine.

    Any virtual OS machine. On Any Android (etc etc) device. See, the thing is — I don’t personally know. The question only occurred to me when I typed that request.

    As an Educator, you appear to be sorely remiss in your professional duties on this point. Is there one?

  15. kurkosdr says:

    *sigh* ROONEY = ARM (autocorrect)

  16. kurkosdr says:

    David = Dalvik

  17. kurkosdr says:

    Last I heard, Android was a VM….
    Android is a mess of David and Native apps. So you get the usual VM/emulation slowness combined with native apps needing emulation when run on a foreign IS (such A ROONEY native apps on x86).

    There is nothing preventing running a VM over Android, but I don’t know any specific VM app. But any apo settings this VM app stored in the apo folder are hidden from you and nor editable by you. On Windows such restriction does not exist.

  18. ram says:

    When France leaves NATO they will mandate FLOSS. As long as they remain occupied they will have to do what their master wants.

  19. DrLoser wrote, “can you run a VM of any kind on stock Android?”

    Last I heard, Android was a VM…. Remember Oracle suing them not to use Oracle’s Java VM? In principle nothing prevents running one VM inside another but it gets a bit silly have one or two layers. I’ve never done it and I’m considered quite silly by some. I prefer KVM to Java any day.

  20. dougman says:

    Speaking of which, I am still in my Sabbatical phase.

    Why would anyone hire a minimum wage chump for IT work? Unless they don’t care about their data, LAN/WAN, software and hardware.

  21. DrLoser says:

    Just out of interest, can you run a VM of any kind on stock Android?

    I genuinely don’t know. But since there are all sorts of problems with “repurposing” an Android device via a direct installation of another operating system … shades of UEFI paranoia here … I just thought I’d ask.

    It would seem to be the obvious way forward for a Small Smart Thingie, and a way to get around those nasty little limitations to Freedom that Kurks has pointed out.

  22. DrLoser says:

    Some of my old clients, have asked “begged” me to do consulting work for them. Fine, $125/hr payable in Bitcoin.

    Good for you, Dougie! The era of -unemployment- Sabbatical is finally over!

    Mind you, if your clients can’t find a cheaper option — say, Maryland State Minimum Wage — then I suspect there’s something hopelessly wrong with them.

    What particular skills are on offer for this no doubt very reasonable hourly stipend?

  23. dougman says:

    Re: conversion process?? Obviously you don;t know much about Bitcoin, as there is no need to convert. I have a shift card..https://www.shiftpayments.com/

    Now on the subject of VAT, we don’t have that here thankfully and are you trying to insinuate by using Bitcoin I am conveying illegality? Please…criminals prefer cash these days.

    I prefer direct-direct transfers without an need for a third-party, think about that. Right now, I could send you $25USD, and you would receive it instantly to use.

    The future is now.

  24. kurkosdr says:

    An app that is FLOSS has no such problems. One can edit even the code if one wished let alone the data.

    Lol, talk about FOSS OSes suddenly changed to talk about FOSS apps. You are weird, you know.

    Anyway, point is the Surface allows you access to the app’s folder while Android doesn’t. On an unrooted phone, only data the app is specifically coded to export (very rare even among FOSS apps) can be exported from the app’s folder

    Rooting happens. Live with it.
    No it doesn’t. It’s the reason there is no modder community for Android while there is for Windows. Anyway, since pretending not to have heard things is your thing, let me list again in bullet form the significant problems with rooting:
    – non-manufacturer endorsed, hackish
    – possible-upgrade-breaker
    – requires-third-party-tools from who knows where (different for every phone and version)
    – potentially warranty-breaking procedure.

    In plain English, Google’s OS is designed to be a locked down thing, with it not showing app folders. But, das kernel is open and lights up my existence or something. Even if it’s behind a locked bootloader making the compiled kernel hard-to-impossible to replace.

    You ‘ll cheer for everything as long as it’s FOSS, right? You’ve already being conditioned to accept being locked out of the app folders of your own apps holding your own data (without “rooting”, see above)

    —-

    Fine, $125/hr payable in Bitcoin.
    Because you want to dodge service VAT or do some other illegality, and hence want to be untraceable presumably? Otherwise why not accept ‘merican dollars or eurocrat euros? Which has no conversion process involved?

  25. dougman says:

    The past month, I have been asked more about Linux and Linux Mint in general than I ever remember.

    Some of my old clients, have asked “begged” me to do consulting work for them. Fine, $125/hr payable in Bitcoin.

  26. dougman wrote, “Not a sustainable business venture I would say.”

    That’s the case by the numbers in M$’s latest SEC filing, negatives all over the client OS division. They’re even getting a decreasing “patent tax” on Android/Linux despite Android growing at a huge rate. It’s downhill for the forseeable future. Eventually, their PC-empire might rest on some core users in business etc., but the days of one copy of their OS on every desktop are over. They got close but very few really needed their product, as I’ve been saying for many years. The world is catching up. It’s still a pity the remaining desktops are not being paved with GNU/Linux but GNU/Linux’ share is growing despite the decline in shipments of PCs. OEMs certainly don’t see M$’s way as being paved with gold as they once did and retailers aren’t wasting nearly as much space on M$ as they used to do. Soon, if it’s not already happening, the slaves in retail will demand to be paid by M$ to sell M$’s stuff. The business can still be profitable but only with a realistic margin.

  27. dougman says:

    M$ Surface, so popular, that paid the NFL $400 million back in 2013, to ensure that its Microsoft Surface would remain the “Official Tablet of the NFL” for a period of five years.

    They are giving away their software and paying people to take their devices. Not a sustainable business venture I would say.

  28. kurkosdr wrote, “rooting man. You should do a non-manufacturer endorsed, hackish, possible-upgrade-breaker, requires-third-party-tools from who knows where, potentially warranty-breaking procedure to get access to stuff the Surface gives you right away”

    That’s nonsense. Apps are mostly non-Free software. An app that is FLOSS has no such problems. One can edit even the code if one wished let alone the data. Rooting happens. Live with it. The code of the kernel is what handles the hardware and that’s FLOSS. So the user has ultimate access to the hardware. That’s what matters. With TOOS, a user is SOL with a change of hardware. I know. I had a lady who could not print with “ME” but could print with GNU/Linux, so we installed GNU/Linux. That was due to forced retirement of a component of the driver by M$. Now we have Skylake not working with older versions all due to M$, nothing else.

  29. kurkosdr says:

    Note for users who haven’t used android: There is an “app folder” in internal storage you have access to (under the /sdcard/Android folder) but this is not where app data such as savegames and important settings are held. I want the real app folder. In the Surface you can, in Android nope without… rooting man (see previous post).

    And there is of course the issue of patching using a third-party patcher (there is a reason there is a thriving modder community in Windows but not in Android).

  30. kurkosdr says:

    Please explain to the rest of the class, how a proprietary OS, such as Windows, is readily more customizable sans delving into the registry?

    If an app has a file I want to edit (such as a save game), I can go into the app’s folder and open it with notepad or favorite hex editor. Or replace it with another version of the file I got from a friend or from another device I own. In Android, all you have to manage app data is “clear all app’s data”.

    That’s how.

    Also, an already installed app cannot be patched by a third-party patcher, even if the user wants this to happen.

    I understand protecting the OS’s files from users, I understand protecting the app’s folder from other apps, but I should have access to the app’s folder, or at least all the app data.

    But… rooting man. You should do a non-manufacturer endorsed, hackish, possible-upgrade-breaker, requires-third-party-tools from who knows where, potentially warranty-breaking procedure to get access to stuff the Surface gives you right away (just double click on the C: drive). That’s the freedom of GoogleFOSS.

  31. dougman says:

    Re: A Windows Surface is far more customizable

    Please explain to the rest of the class, how a proprietary OS, such as Windows, is readily more customizable sans delving into the registry?

    Linux is way more customizable then the lock-down / lock-in bullshit that Redmond dishes out these days. This is proven by how many various distributions there are and various kernels being used.

  32. kurkosdr says:

    People are using Chromebooks, Kindle’s and Android smartphones, the majority of the web is run by Linux.

    So, your idea of success all those years wasn’t something like Linux Mint or an OS X clone, but a neutered version of Linux limited to what Google wants it do to. Riiigght… Duly noted.

    Infact, Android is the “unLinux” OS. Everything except the user’s “home folder” (aka internal storage) is locked away from the user (without rooting), the apps that are really popular with the customer base function with the proprietary Play Services only, it doesn’t even have a default file manager and the apps are slowly replaced by proprietary replacements found in the Play Store.

    A Windows Surface is far more customizable (without hacks such as rooting) than Android.

    Which is also a clear example of “FOSS” not always being “free”. One more example: An old TV tuner has proprietary drivers and proprietary video recording app, but doesn’t halt recording in the presence of CGMS-A. An open-source video recording box does stop at the presence of a CGMS-A (because of regulations or whatever), and you can’t modify the software because the bootloader is locked and there is no usb debug bridge. Question: Does the second thing offer more freedom to the user than the first thing?

  33. dougman says:

    This is what someone commented to me about Windows 10.

    I don’t like it so far. The interface seems dumbed down.

    I do not use any talking apps, so I fail to see what advantage using Cortana provides.

    Microsoft did nothing to help me understand any of the new features, after the upgrade which is very weird.

    I hate having to use Bing for Windows searches.

    I left Internet Explorer years ago, so will not be looking into Edge.

    I will not be buying apps. Whats the point?

    Everything is different than before, I see no advantage to any of it.

    I may roll it all back to Windows 7, but as you said my options in the future will be very limited. I will have to look into Linux Mint as you said.

  34. dougman says:

    Re: There is no way Linux will succeed on desktop.

    Heh, it already has succeeded. People are using Chromebooks, Kindle’s and Android smartphones, the majority of the web is run by Linux.

    Why you are arguing that Linux cannot this or cannot that, Linux already is succeeding.

  35. Deaf Spy wrote, “There is no way Linux will succeed on desktop, when in fair competition with Microsoft and Apple. The only way for it to break through is to be pushed mandatory.”

    That’s nonsense. The schools where I installed GNU/Linux accepted it willingly as the lowest cost and most practical way of doing IT. They thrived on donated hardware and Apple’s stuff could not legally run on it. That hardware came with XP and XP did not work for those schools. Too much trouble. Hence, GNU/Linux.

    That’s what Munich, Peugeot, and Largo did too. Of course, you can call any decision “mandatory”, but that’s your problem. There are some organizations that make choice of OS optional but they are pretty few. My bank, for instance, does not let employees choose applications nor OS, because they have one way of doing things and it works for them. The bank could decide tomorrow to go with GNU/Linux and that would be that. I’m sure it would be another successful migration.

  36. kurkosdr says:

    The only way for it to break through is to be pushed mandatory. = The only way for it to break through is to be pushed mandatory with taxpayers picking up the tab and productivity being an afterthought.

    (fixed that for you)

    If you thought the military-industrial complex was bad, just wait for the government-funded software development complex

    We ‘ve already got a taste of this with the EU funding Symbian OS just before it died. Nice choice of basket to put the taxpayer’s eggs, eurocrats.

  37. Deaf Spy says:

    Keyword is “mandatory”.

    There is no way Linux will succeed on desktop, when in fair competition with Microsoft and Apple. The only way for it to break through is to be pushed mandatory.

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