Enslaving M$

“Microsoft issued $13 billion of senior notes with various maturities to be used for general corporate purposes. Fitch expects Microsoft will use net proceeds mainly for stock buy backs given the company’s plan to complete the $17.9 billion remaining under the current $40 billion share repurchase authorization by Dec. 31, 2016.”
 
See Fitch Rates Microsoft’s Senior Notes Offering ‘AA+’
It’s kind of embarassing to have to borrow money to pay debts… but that’s what M$ continues to do. It has $100 billion in liquid assets but it can’t repatriate them to USA without forking out a ton of money to Uncle Sam for taxes, so it borrows money at this end to pay for what it does day to day. The problem is chickens come home to roost. When the day inevitably comes that the world sees M$ has no clothes and that M$ is not the one true source of IT, the gravy train ends but the debts will have to be paid. At the last 10-Q quarterly report, M$ reported $36billion in short+long term debt. Now about half it’s liquid assets will be needed just to repay that debt.

Yes, the increasing debt to asset ratio is a sign of the end of monopoly. I find it interesting that rather than being conservative and staying debt-free when the sun shines on the empire, they’ve already decided the end is near and they will rob Peter to pay Paul (Fitch expects the money will be used to buy back shares to prop up the share-price) until the last moment, like some drunk/gambler/fool. They are issuing notes out as far as 2055. I wonder if they will be able to pay the bills long before that. Clearly, the cloud is growing for them but that desktop environment is endangered and the server environment faces stiff competition. Fitch’s rating assumes governments won’t force repatriation of the money and that the gravy train continues… What could possibly go wrong?

Meanwhile huge government departments are using their own clouds based on OpenStack and their own office suites based on LibreOffice and OpenOffice.org, any browser but Internet Exploder and yes, even desktop GNU/Linux. I find it amusing to think of this not just as the decline of a monopolist but its enslavement of itself just as it enslaved users for decades. Most slaves have to be captured but M$ is enclosing itself with debt willingly, seeing no other option. Cattle do what’s expected in the chute at the slaughterhouse but they don’t build the chute.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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86 Responses to Enslaving M$

  1. luvr says:

    I have just gotten hold of a Windows 8 laptop, the owner of which was fed up with the headaches that it kept on giving her. She decided to dump the laptop and get a MacBook instead (her choice, not mine). She had considered degrading to Windows 10, but when she read the comments about it, she quickly realised that it would mean even more of the crashes, slowdowns, and headaches that she wanted to run away from. Her brother has a MacBook, and he hasn’t had any significant issues since he got it, some six years ago.

    Since she wanted to get rid of the laptop anyway, I asked her if I could have it, because I suspected that the hardware was fine, but that the Windows was crap. (I was right.)

    Of course, since it came preinstalled with Windows 8, the laptop was set up with the Securely Restricted Microsoft Windows 8 Boot abomination, and consequently, also with UEFI. Fortunately, entering BIOS setup was surprisingly easy (it just took a Google search, because it was otherwise unclear how to do it): just pressing F2 when the manufacturer’s logo (Toshiba) briefly displays during system startup got me there. I disabled the abomination, and booted a Xubuntu live session from CD. Worked great—Xubuntu from CD even performed infinitely better than Windows 8 from harddisk!

    I now have UEFI disabled as well, and switched to what is apparently called “CSM” (“Compatibility Support Module”), which any sensible human being would probably call “Legacy BIOS”. Xubuntu is now installed on the harddisk, and it works like a charm. It is clearly a great laptop; I just cannot understand why anyone wants to destroy the user experience by insisting that it should run Windows… Surely, manufacturers cannot be happy seeing how Microsoft’s crap gives their perfectly fine, even great, hardware such a bad name?

  2. DrLoser, not seeing humour in anything, wrote, “Do you see Canonical as a more moral and ethical and less tax-evasive company than M$, or not?”

    ISTR that folks here were recently writing that Canonical was deep in the hole. Who taxes losses?

  3. DrLoser says:

    I hate to bang on about being honest and consistent and objective and all those sorts of things that having a background in science and mathematics should have trained you in, Mr Pogson, but regrettably I have to call you back in order:

    How much of Canonical’s earned income — earned from somewhere outside the Isle of Man — is held in a place other than the Isle of Man?

    And now, back to whether you have a legitimate beef against Microsoft on these specific terms or not.

    Let me put this as bluntly as I can, Robert.

    Do you see Canonical as a more moral and ethical and less tax-evasive company than M$, or not?

    A simple yes or no will suffice. Your reasoning will undoubtedly be totally spurious.

  4. dougman says:

    Windows 10 is a failed product! http://www.neowin.net/news/tech-support-reps-are-recommending-users-to-uninstall-windows-10-to-resolve-pc-problems

    – Edge browser fails to win over users, people prefer Chrome/Firefox.
    – Microsoft tries to change your mind, before changing the default browser Edge to something else.
    – Updates hang at 44% with SD cards installed.
    – Deleting and changing default programs

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/106238/20151114/windows-10-threshold-2-installation-problems-start-hitting-users.htm

    Notice the troll in the comments section…lol

    I see more and more problems creeping up with every update; long-term the “outlook” of Win-Dohs doesn’t look so great.

  5. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser not exactly. VMWare is number 2 on Linux in best of breed. I stated that quite clearly.

    Best of breed class have ranking. OS X between paralls and vmware rank is not deterred. Attempting to make generic cross OS statements is a huge error DrLoser about time you stop it. VMWare is number 2 on Linux for VM solutions. Its also classed in the best of breed group because it can decently perform. Like virtualbox is not best of breed because it has performance and driver issues.

    By the way DrLoser there is a best of breed for closed source and a best of breed for open source under Linux for VM solution. So there are two titles of best of breed to give out. Under OS X there is also two titles to give out. Parallel VM under OS X is OSX only software and VMWare is cross platform application. This is the problem DrLoser key thing VMWare is not solo best of bread on Linux or OS X. The reality is software is a per OS thing.

    So, Fifi, your theory is that VMWare is best of breed on Windows, OSX and Linux.
    So this is DrLoser jumping to the wrong out come.

    DrLoser forget trying to get us to Hate Ubuntu. Ubuntu is not the only splinter group off Debian.

    https://www.debian.org/consultants/

    Exactly what is the difference between a consultant spinning up a custom item for a client or Canonical.

    Serousally this shows how dumb you are. DrLoser HP makes custom Linux images for their clients as well. Should we be complaining at HP.

    Also Ubuntu maintainers do upstream patches into main line Debian and upstream projects. This is documented in the bugzillas of Ubuntu and Debian. Of course DrLoser is going off completely without research and basically spreading bull crap again. Ubuntu is not exactly the best but they are not a complete vampire either.

    You complain about me not telling the truth. The reality here here you doing exactly that again and again and again DrLoser.

    http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v13n1/clark.html
    kurkosdr reality is lots and lots of places have been collecting data on what is in fact used. Then there are groups that link up all this data.

  6. DrLoser says:

    Of course, Microsoft is a major multi-national corporation that operates in all corners of the world. I don’t say that they should hide profits — they are profits, right, Robert, actual coin of whichever realm it is — from the local taxman in say Fiji or Guatemala or Brazil or wherever. But, you know, storing those profits in Fiji or Guatemala or Brazil or wherever doesn’t sound entirely despicable.

    Now then.

    Returning to Canonical.

    And completely ignoring the 800lb FLOSS Gorilla, which is that Canonical is a huge rip-off merchant, and that they rip off Debian in particular. We’re not talking about leeching off other peoples’ coding for free, Robert, because that is basically what you, Robert, do.

    No, this is an entirely financial point.

    How much money do you think that Canonical makes in the Isle of Man, from inhabitants of the Isle of Man, from businesses and the government of the Isle of Man, and I’ll even give you the questionable “offshores” in the Isle of Man fer free?

    I don’t know myself. I expect you can enlighten me. Pending which enlightenment …

    How much of Canonical’s earned income — earned from somewhere outside the Isle of Man — is held in a place other than the Isle of Man?

    And now, back to whether you have a legitimate beef against Microsoft on these specific terms or not.

    Over to you, Robert.

  7. DrLoser says:

    The missing word being obvious.

    “Do you have a beef against …?”

  8. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser wrote, “Do you have a beef against companies that store a large percentage of their ready cash and/or profit in a tax-free environment?”

    A corporation is a person in law and should suffer the same taxation as other citizens. What would happen to John Doe if he was paid in cash and mailed it in a shoebox to some money-laundering operation overseas? M$ blah blah blah

    A simple, unqualified, answer to a simple, unqualified question please, Robert.

    Do you have a against companies that store a large percentage of their ready cash and/or profit in a tax-free environment?

    The reason I ask this question is that it seems to cut to the quick on your OP.

    You either have a beef, or you do not.

    Restricting the theoretical list of companies who do store a large percentage of their ready cash in such an environment to that subset of companies whose business includes Operating Systems … not a necessary restriction, but one which at least tests the thesis in your OP … we are left with a small set.

    As it happens, this set includes Google, but they are saintly and shall be left outside the present discussion.

    It also includes Apple, but of course you swivel between admiration of Apple and loathing of the same on grounds that generally speaking have nothing whatsoever to do with how much money they stash in foreign bank accounts.

    We’re left with two basic members of the set, then.
    1) Microsoft, who by your OP stash $100 billion in foreign accounts. Not necessarily tax free accounts, but still. Let this stand as a marker. If necessary that $100 billion can be “repatriated” at some punitive rate, say 41%.
    2) Canonical, who on any judgement whatsoever, stash all of their ready cash in a tax-free environment.

    Now, Canonical can hardly repatriate this cash. It’s already tax-free. It’s already held in the Isle of Man.

    So, on behalf of your theoretical John Doe, Robert:

    Do you have a against companies that store a large percentage of their ready cash and/or profit in a tax-free environment?

    Because, if so, and pardon me for stating the bleeding obvious, that would mean that you have a beef against Canonical.

    And if not …

  9. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser sorry best of breed in applications is a OS Dependant thing.

    VMWare is best of breed on Windows.
    Parallels and VMWare is best of breed on OS X.
    KVM and VMWare is best of breed on Linux.

    So, Fifi, your theory is that VMWare is best of breed on Windows, OSX and Linux.

    That was very helpful, although it doesn’t advance the topic very far, does it?

    Considering that we seem to be in 100% agreement …

  10. kurkosdr says:

    ” studies” or reality Ohioham? Who you think will win?

  11. oiaohm wrote, ” Least suitable market with the most non Linux applications issues. Home Users.”

    That’s not true at all. In most countries usage of GNU/Linux goes up when governments, schools etc. are shut down. I’ve interacted with quite a few home-users. Some played games. Others kept Facebook open all day long. No special applications are needed to keep people amused for hours per day.

  12. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr
    Anyway, the problem is that those 10% are NOT the same 10% of the population, and although overlapping a bit, when you add them together they add up to considerably more. Got it?
    Sorry to screw you over but you have not read the studies. The reality is the highest application dependency is only about 7 percent. 10 to 20 percent is all the different desktop applications joined up. Of course the variation is the maths is why its 10 to 20 percent. Optimistic is 90 percent don’t need anything particular 80 percent is the pessimistic who don’t need anything particular. But that is if you have a web browser and basic editing programs of suitable quality.

    Windows phone gets into disaster zone because even the web browser on it is a nightmare for support.

    To be correct the fact you raised something interesting kurkosdr. Strava is for cyclists. Globally Cyclists are less than 7 percent. Yet there is a city where 50+ percent of the population is Cyclists. That is Copenhagen.

    The global usage requirements for OS is not going to be the Country to Country or city to city or even house to house.

    Sorry I have provided surveys and white papers giving the 80-90/20-10 percentages before kurkosdr.

    Remember finding where particular gas stations are happen to be a web browser action. Delete everything that you can do with a basic email client/text editor/Office suite/Browser the look at what is left and that is the percentage the Linux desktop cannot cover by those surveys. Yes they were quite brutal. Now of course Windows phone cannot do all that Windows phone number is closer to 50/50.

    Linux Desktop 1 in 5 to 1 in 10 chance it will not suite you. Windows Phone flip a coin. Android is 1 in 1o to 1 in 20 chance it will not suite you. What is kinda surprising to some that Android is more suitable than Linux Desktop.

    Windows numbers of course are better. 1 in 50 that your task will not be suitable to perform under Windows. Problem is you are paying quite a cost for this. Business and governments can make real saving. Remember 1 in 50 is 100 of millions of people.

    80-90 percent don’t need any particular OS as long as the OS is decently functional. Decently functional does not cover issues like Windows Phone.

    The surprising thing to most people its rare for more than 5 percent of the population in the area to be doing the same kind of job. Now here is the thing that is trap. 96 percent of the population who work don’t need any specialty software at all for work. What pushes 4 percent up to 10 to 20 percent is what people do at home and in their spare time.

    Now you would have know all these if you had spent time tracking down surveys and studies than going around presuming stuff kurkosdr.

    The most suitable markets Linux Desktop is going to find will be schools, Businesses and Governments. Least suitable market with the most non Linux applications issues. Home Users.

    kurkosdr I guess you have focused on Linux has home user point of view. Business point of view is different. Home users are way more likely to find Linux does not suit them. Different groups different areas different percentage of risk if Desktop Linux will or will not be compatible.

  13. Deaf Spy wrote, “You and Pogson’s clutching to French police and Munich (which is an increasing disaster)”

    Deaf Spy spouts facts not in evidence. GNU/Linux is thriving in government in Europe.

  14. oiaohm wrote, “I commonly reference the 90/10-80/20 split where 90 percent of users don’t need a particular OS or software.”

    For folks who use a computer to replace a typewriter, fax, and often browse the web, GNU/Linux works for 100%. That’s about the case in most of the schools in which I worked. They were largely paper-based because there weren’t enough PCs for all students all the time, so they used LibreOffice to create paper documents and to plan lessons etc. The browser/web/local servers augmented that well enough for any new ideas in education. It’s not rocket science and even those guys use GNU/Linux.

  15. kurkosdr says:

    I commonly reference the 90/10-80/20 split where 90 percent of users don’t need a particular OS or software.

    Ahh.. the Windows Phone and Linux Desktop fallacy, neately laid out.

    For example, WP fans will tell you it doesn’t need Strava because only 10% of users need it. It doesn’t need that latest fad game because only 10% of users need it. It doesn’t need that app the university has made for students because only 10% of users need it. It doesn’t need an app to find LPG or CNG gas stations in that country because only 10% of users of that country need it. It doesn’t need videos in Instagram because… okay that might be more than 10% of users.

    Anyway, the problem is that those 10% are NOT the same 10% of the population, and although overlapping a bit, when you add them together they add up to considerably more. Got it?

    Same for Linux Desktop. Only that the Linux Desktop had the opportunity to commoditize win32 back in 1995 when it hadn’t grew so much and they blew it.

  16. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy sorry I have used Australian criminals recently as well. I do change between quite a few different ones.

    The reason why I brought out the same one is DrLoser should have already know that example so should not have made such a bull crap claim that can kicked to the kerb with the same old example.

    Also please don’t make claims I never made Deaf Spy.

    We already have some professionals using Linux Desktop full time as it covers their requirements. The question is how many more fields will the Linux Desktop cover in the next 12. Throwing out the generic professional really is not wise.
    I am down right clear that Linux does not cover everyone here.

    Deafspy I have never supported the claim that “Linux works for everyone”.

    Please don’t link me again to a claim I don’t support. I commonly reference the 90/10-80/20 split where 90 percent of users don’t need a particular OS or software. There is a percentage in the 10 percent who really do need Windows. This numbers are based on different white papers and surveys.

  17. Deaf Spy says:

    Like professional French police officers use Linux Desktops all the time.

    You know what, Fifi. You and Pogson’s clutching to French police and Munich (which is an increasing disaster) to support your futile claim that “Linux works for everyone” is like an old prostitute showing a photograph from her pre-teenage years to prove that she used to be a virgin once.

    It is just pathetic.

  18. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser sorry best of breed in applications is a OS Dependant thing.

    VMWare is best of breed on Windows.
    Parallels and VMWare is best of breed on OS X.
    KVM and VMWare is best of breed on Linux. Please note KVM is free and can convert it OS images to VMWare format and also use VMWare format images. So exactly why spend 120 dollars if the built in by default virtual machine of Linux does the job. KVM of course has the lowest number of issues due to software updating than any other VM solution under Linux. VMWare under Linux might give you application more performance but you also pick up increase risk failure in operation. So a person using Linux does not look at the 120 dollars for VMWare as such a good deal. You need justified performance gains to use VMWare under Linux to cover the risk of VMWare not running due to updates or other issues and that is why VMWare is number 2 under Linux not number 1.

    In the past, one used Wine until one got sick and tired of breakage and lossage.
    You are aware there are paid for editions of Wine. Wine is still used because running application in VMWare or KVM can be slower than running them in Wine by a large margin. The insanity here is a program running in Wine under Linux at times can be faster than the same program running on Window on real hardware. Wine is more a question of how performance sensitive the problem is. People wanting to run games are always going to look in wine project if native does not exist or perform well.

    The question is, can the Linux desktop as it is now (or will be in the traditional forward-looking twelve month period of hope, anxious belief, and excruciatingly savage disappointment) work for professionals with requirements specific to their profession?
    DrLoser the problem here you don’t get at all. Depend on the professional. Like professional French police officers use Linux Desktops all the time. There system has no Virtual machines instead they have developed all the software they need to be cross platform or Linux. We already have some professionals using Linux Desktop full time as it covers their requirements. The question is how many more fields will the Linux Desktop cover in the next 12. Throwing out the generic professional really is not wise.

    One of the big road blocks is in fact X11. To be more exact Closed source X11 drivers.

    Lets point out something super insane. Ever since Nvidia implemented CUDA to use CUDA in a service on a server has required installing X11 server and just to make matters worse that X11 server has to have root privilege and be running while you perform CUDA operations.

    So first question is in the next 12 months will we at along last have all major-ally used video card drivers under Linux support KMS and DRI3. Because if this is support OS security goes up same with stability. The issue we have is the Linux kernel and X.org developers design a interface for graphics under MIT license(so totally not restrictive) that Nvidia closed source ignores on x86 and AMD is only going to fully support including closed source driver parts on their news cards. So some wins but that battle is not over.

    Next question is how platform Dependant are applications going to remain.
    https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Development/Emscripten
    Emscripten form of Libreoffice raise question of how complex of application can in fact run in browsers JIT/AOT for JavaScript. Particularly considering Libreoffice is doing this with existing code base. Of course if all the applications you use are not platform Dependant exactly why pay for Windows.

    Are we going to see non game and developer applications appear in steam for Linux in the next 12 months or more applications for Linux with correctly bundled runtime. So providing stable third party applications on Linux. This is a fairly major barrier to Linux. Problem here its not really the Distributions problem to fix.

    In the future … possibly … one might use Teh Cloudz. Whether or not this proposition will ever become viable is an interesting argument, and worthy of discussion.
    I have some really bad news I already know of businesses who complete operations are thin clients connect to cloud hosted VDI. Due to privacy laws and confirmed cases of USA spying lot of companies are looking into server hosted.

    Server hosted go back to problem 1 proper video card drivers. Because you will be wanting to share GPU between users/virtual machines. Please remember all major VDI hyper-visors (yes all of them bar hyper-v) depend on the Linux kernel. So how well Linux kernel can manage GPU effects this problem in a big way.

    Desktop and Server on Linux is very heavily interlinked. As Linux improves on the Desktop the quality of Windows VDI that can be provided improves as well.

  19. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser please note VMWare is not always the fastest.

    oiaohm please not I do not care.

    Nor is it any part of the argument. The question is, can the Linux desktop as it is now (or will be in the traditional forward-looking twelve month period of hope, anxious belief, and excruciatingly savage disappointment) work for professionals with requirements specific to their profession?

    And the answer, as I have pointed out, is a resounding no. Nothing wrong with that actually — because it was never intended to do so.

    In the past, one used Wine until one got sick and tired of breakage and lossage.

    Presently, one uses VMWare (because it is “best of breed” and in fact incredibly good value at about $120 per license) or, if cheap, some other virtual machine technology.

    In the future … possibly … one might use Teh Cloudz. Whether or not this proposition will ever become viable is an interesting argument, and worthy of discussion.

    The abject and permanent failure that is the Linux Desktop is neither interesting, nor worthy of discussion.

  20. oiaohm says:

    Do 90% of real, paying, job in virtual machine.
    Mind you depending on the the software package this can be a good thing.

    I have had accountancy packages destroy OS. So having snapshots to roll back to can be extremely good to reduce down time.

    DrLoser please note VMWare is not always the fastest.

    http://grids.ucs.indiana.edu/ptliupages/publications/Cloud_2014.pdf

    It really depends on the professional program you are attempting to run. Some times(about 50 percent of the time) you are better off in KVM. So “trusty VMWare virtual machine ” could be very wrong. You should have stopped at fire up your trusty virtual machine. Stating VMWare is a mistake as it could be performance incompatible with the application you need to run.

    It might come as total surprise to you, oh, uzo-loving Kurks, but IE6 has very little bugs, because it was de facto the standard.
    Deafspy really please don’t attempt to rewrite history.
    http://www.position-absolute.com/articles/css-for-ie6-6-common-problems-and-fast-ways-to-fix-them/
    Yes insert a comment and Ie6 processing bugs at times would magically disappear. So you minor-ally edit a website delete a comment and then have users of IE6 complaining the site it broken. IE6 is extremely hated by web developers due to how touchy it is with comments and the like.

  21. oiaohm says:

    1) When is the last time you can remember Microsoft or Apple having “connect and disconnect monitor issues?”
    DrLoser Windows 10 with intel drivers that was the last. Fairly much XP on with intel drivers on Windows has had monitor connect and disconnect issues. Different AMD and Nvidia drivers have shown the bug over the time frame. Ubuntu guys where the first to go hey we need to make an automated testing device for this.

  22. DrLoser says:

    Anyway, Robert. This “embarrassing requirement to borrow money” as per the OP?

    You’d have to admit, without significant back-up from people who actually understand how the finances of large corporations work, that you were just fantasizing here.

    Or possibly not. I await your justification with considerable interest.

  23. Deaf Spy says:

    it would be impossible even for the Gods to copy all the bugs of IE6

    It might come as total surprise to you, oh, uzo-loving Kurks, but IE6 has very little bugs, because it was de facto the standard. Yes. With it’s 90% marketshare, IE6 ruled them all, and all developers were free to focus on it and handle all possible issues in a single way. MS missed the moment to beat all competition on feature-rich basis and end the browser war the same way it ended the OS war.

    Well, no need to shed tears on past events.

    Now, do you know what the next IE6 will be? Answer: Safari. No efforts from Google will kill it, not now, not in the next 10 years. Safari has so many quirks, especially in its mobile versions, that it hurts.

  24. DrLoser says:

    You might notice that Internet Exploder is not the dominant web-browser. A whole lot of fiddling went on to make that happen because M$ certainly does not shove other browsers at the user.

    I hadn’t noticed. I don’t care. We’re still fixated on the DoJ thing, aren’t we, Robert?

    Now, this “fiddling.” Let’s assume, for the sake of your pitiful and spurious argument, that it is really difficult, perhaps bordering on impossible, to find a download site for Chrome or Firefox or even Safari. (Danger, Will Robinson! It is not difficult at all!)

    To add to the difficulty factor, let’s assume, for the sake of your pitiful and spurious argument, that almost nobody at all has even heard of Chrome or Firefox or Safari. The swine, the ignorant swine! Sheeple! And so on. (Danger, Will Robinson! This is not your father’s Oldsmobile! Everybody and their pet budgie has heard of alternatives.)

    Well then. On your fatuous, bigoted, pitiful and spurious assumptions, nobody would be able to fiddle at all, would they?

    And yet they do.

    Funny, that. Because “fiddling” is a one-click thing for each and every one of those browser alternatives on Windows.

    Apparently the Sheeple are actually smarter than you are, Robert.

  25. DrLoser says:

    Why would anyone bother to taint Linux with Windows BS?

    A very sage and important question, Dougie. Many thanks for asking it. You’re on fire, aren’t you? The answer, as you correctly divined, but for the wrong reasons, is that nobody would.

    The reasons are equally simple, though somewhat asymmetrical:

    1) If you’re a FOSSie, you wouldn’t use a “Windows” application even if it were demonstrably better. Which proposition is amply demonstrated by your use of the word “taint.”

    2) If you’re 90% of professionals, who rely upon professional software to increase their value at work, then you’re not going to want to “taint” Linux with anything at all. Mostly, you won’t notice Linux, because it isn’t even on your desktop. But, if it were, I would assume that the average vanilla day for a professional who uses specialized packages as a matter of course would be:

    a) Fire up trusty ole Debian Wheeze.
    b) Bask in the happiness of a regression to 2001 or so.
    c) Needz moar Insert Professional Package X Here!
    d) Fire up trusty VMWare virtual machine featuring Windows 7.
    e) (optional) Curse FLOSS loonies who are trying to take VMWare down.
    f) Do 90% of real, paying, job in virtual machine.

    Of course, years ago, (f) would have been the rather unsatisfactory Wine. And in the near future, (f) may well be Teh Cloudz. But, right now, (f) is basically a dependable virtual machine.

    Things change, Dougie, but they don’t change that much. Any possible way to reach a professional solution to a potentially enriching problem … pretty much anybody at all will take.

    Taint or otherwise.

  26. dougman says:

    …and how many people actually require Photoshop, Sony Vegas, DVDFab, AviAddXSubs, Subtitle WorkShop, Machete Lite etc??

    Interestingly enough, there are suitable alternatives for those titles already available for Linux.

    Adobe even has a online Photoshop editor that people can use, regardless of which OS anyone uses.

  27. kurkosdr says:

    Why would anyone bother to taint Linux with Windows BS?

    Because of the high value applications that cost a crapload of money to produce, and nobody is going to port them for an 2%er OS, unless this OS offers some kind of familiarity in APIs. Aka what it was known back then as Linux Desktop’s problem, but is now also Windows Phone’s problem.

    And don’t just think that “high-value” means uber-expensive software like Photoshop or Sony Vegas.

    There is lots of super-useful freeware software like DVDFab, AviAddXSubs, Subtitle WorkShop, Machete Lite etc

    But you are falling into the same trap as WP fanboys, aka “if I don’t need it, you should either” and “my ideology trumps function”

  28. dougman says:

    Why would anyone bother to taint Linux with Windows BS?

    Linux is far faster and has a miniscule malware footprint, as opposed the the bloat of Windows.

  29. kurkosdr says:

    diving = dividing

  30. kurkosdr says:

    You might notice that Internet Exploder is not the dominant web-browser.

    Lololol, Edge doesn’t even show up, you have to download the csv to get it.

    Where there are standards, the best will survive.

    If FOSSies had one working braincell, they would try to commoditize as much of the win32 API as possible and use it as a first-class API, instead of diving themselves among GTK and KDE and what else. After all, DOS succeeded because it copied CP/M’s API, gnu/linux succeded because it copied unix’s API.

    It doesn’t have to be bug-for-bug compatible. Firefox wasn’t bug-for-bug compatible with IE6. But they used the same formats, so devs could do a couple of fixing and have their pages work on Firefox too.

    But most FOSSIes still look wine in disdain, and make vague claims about OS/2. Never mind that windows compatibility saved OS/2 from becoming a completely alien (to developers) OS like Xenix or BeOS. Never mind because OS/2 was killed because of high price (back when computers where already expensive), high memory requirements (more cost) and freezes due to it’s single input queue for the GUI.

    *it would be impossible even for the Gods to copy all the bugs of IE6

  31. dougman says:

    Everyone I have spoken to of late, has told me vehemently that Windows 10 sucks. A few even told me that they would prefer to use Windows 8 instead, imagine that!

    http://neurogadget.com/2015/11/07/microsofts-plans-after-free-updates-for-windows-10-fail-to-hit-prospectedfigures/19366

  32. DrLoser wrote, “I’d estimate that 99.9% of desktop users get no advantage whatsoever from any fiddling on a Linux desktop that is not also available as a fiddle on a Windows or Macintosh desktop.”

    You might notice that Internet Exploder is not the dominant web-browser. A whole lot of fiddling went on to make that happen because M$ certainly does not shove other browsers at the user. Other fiddling that happens a lot: fighting malware, re-re-rebooting, typing in that awful “authentication code” or whatever M$ calls it today, figuring out why users should “wait, please wait”…

  33. DrLoser wrote, “Do you have a beef against companies that store a large percentage of their ready cash and/or profit in a tax-free environment?”

    A corporation is a person in law and should suffer the same taxation as other citizens. What would happen to John Doe if he was paid in cash and mailed it in a shoebox to some money-laundering operation overseas? M$ largely creates its software here but gets paid elsewhere. Do you think Lincoln Electric could dodge taxes that way? No, because the goods are material. Why should it be any different for copyright works? Many governments are thinking this over and more are going to turn the screws tighter.

  34. DrLoser says:

    One more thing.

    Do you have a beef against companies that store a large percentage of their ready cash and/or profit in a tax-free environment?

    Once again, a simple yes or no will suffice, Robert.

  35. DrLoser says:

    Ah, but the Ubuntu desktop is “better co-ordinated” with “less fiddling.”

    Is it, indeed?

    No need to cite reasons for this ludicrous proposition, Robert. One simple admission will suffice.

    Do you, or do you not, use a Ubuntu desktop configuration?

  36. DrLoser says:

    Canonical/Ubuntu do contribute a lot to FLOSS. Most folks like that their desktop appears to be better coordinated for the user, with less fiddling required.

    Most people don’t even notice, Robert. Most people do not fiddle.

    Do please correct me on this aberrant yet widely held assumption.

    People don’t want to “fiddle” with their desktop. I’d estimate that 95% of desktop users don’t even know how to fiddle.

    And I’d estimate that 99.9% of desktop users get no advantage whatsoever from any fiddling on a Linux desktop that is not also available as a fiddle on a Windows or Macintosh desktop.

    “Freedom,” I understand. A clarion call.

    But “foolish fruitless fiddling?”

    Best left to the owners of sub-standard Chinese tractors, I think.

  37. DrLoser says:

    There is one thing Canonical did design is how to set up testing environments for QA with real hardware. This since 2012 has improved the connect and disconnect monitor issues.

    Very good, Fifi. Very good. I will concede to your point on this one. You are undoubtedly correct.

    Now, answer me two simple questions:

    1) When is the last time you can remember Microsoft or Apple having “connect and disconnect monitor issues?”
    2) Awesome though this particular piece of completely unassisted R&D by Canonical might be, what monetary value would you put upon it?

    I mean, we’re talking tens of millions sunk into the bottomless pit here. It would be nice if at least somebody could put a valuation on it.

    Why not you, Fifi? Google away. Tell us what a huge problem it used to be.

  38. kurkosdr says:

    The more Shuttleworth pours into this money pit, the more he loses.

    Does Shuttleman still pour money into Canonical? If so, why isn’t he still CEO? Is he planning an exit sometime soon, maybe after Canonical’s smartphone/tablet ambitions are officially called dead? Maybe this is the reason he appointed a nobody as the CEO of Canonical, so he can exit without anyone noticing…

  39. oiaohm says:

    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/OHW/VgaSwitch
    you can’t even claim that Canonical offers a net contribution on the technical side, either.
    DrLoser you need to retract this very quickly.

    There is one thing Canonical did design is how to set up testing environments for QA with real hardware. This since 2012 has improved the connect and disconnect monitor issues.

    Yes such a super simple device makes all the difference to QA testing.

    Interesting enough Redhat, Debian, IBM and so on focused more on server issues not direct physical control so never tested the QA for this. So the one thing Ubuntu has been good for is automated simulation of direct control QA stuff.

    KDE project recently praised Ubuntu automated testing stock pile of machines.

    DrLoser I will give you that Ubuntu leaches a lot but what is interesting is the things Ubuntu has done that no other party before them has done but should have been done 20 years ago. The fact Ubuntu has any R&D claims to fame like QA shows issues with the others.

  40. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr I will give S3 sux. S3 did fact have stagefright bug because they lack a GPU for decent video decoding. Basically your problem was exactly the same as a person attempting to play a 3d game on a 2d video card and finding out they don’t have enough cpu/ram to cope. Some android devices truly are horible. But lets not throw the baby out with the bath water.

    My asus nexus 2013 in fact has gpu that does video decoding it makes a difference. Please also note my Asus Nexus 2013 is running 5.1.1 Android.

    Not all Android devices are created equal.

    kurkosdr claiming some android devices have trouble with youtube is correct but its truly not a generic fault. The youtube application presumes you have hardware acceleration. This becomes very horible on devices that don’t have it.

  41. DrLoser, choosing to ignore one of the main advantages of FLOSS, wrote, “In fact, considering that they pretty much entirely depend upon R&D from Debian (directly) and RedHat and Novell and IBM and others … you can’t even claim that Canonical offers a net contribution on the technical side, either.
     
    Which makes them leeches, twice over. And who do they primarily leech off?”

    Quoting Linus: “Imagine ten people putting in 1 hour each every day on the project. They put in one hour of work, but because they share the end results they get nine hours of “other peoples work” for free. It sounds unfair: get nine hours of work for doing one hour. But it obviously is not.”

    Canonical/Ubuntu do contribute a lot to FLOSS. Most folks like that their desktop appears to be better coordinated for the user, with less fiddling required. I don’t see that but many users of Ubuntu GNU/Linux hold that so there must be some truth to it. I’ve had Canonical’s tweaking work against the stability of my systems so I prefer Debian which does less to mangle stuff that actually works… That’s a matter of opinion. It’s not about morality except that FLOSS works for people and isn’t out to get them.

  42. DrLoser says:

    By the way. If it wasn’t for the fact that Canonical is based in the Isle of Man — a tax haven — then things would look far, far worse.

    Compare and contrast to your righteous indignation over M$ holding $100 billion of assets abroad, rather than repatriating them. At least M$ is head-quartered in a location that exacts a reasonable amount of corporate taxation.

    Which is not something you can say about the leeches at Canonical.

    In fact, considering that they pretty much entirely depend upon R&D from Debian (directly) and RedHat and Novell and IBM and others … you can’t even claim that Canonical offers a net contribution on the technical side, either.

    Which makes them leeches, twice over. And who do they primarily leech off?

    Debian, that’s who.

    So, we see here a company fronted by an accidentally rich megalomaniac which has little or no market penetration and which has consistently lost money over the last five years (and more).

    We see here a company which contributes far, far less in corporate taxes and other benefits to its host country.

    We see here a company which, in common though not legal parlance, filches practically all of its R&D from others.

    And last but not least, we see here a company which has been monumentally unsuccessful in advancing the aims of FLOSS.

    Don the cheer-leading outfit, Robert. Repeat after me:

    Rah Rah Rah Canonical!

  43. DrLoser says:

    Canonical is very nearly self-sufficient.

    No it is not.

    For the last few years, total current assets have been doubling annually while liabilities have been increasing at half that rate.


    Assets Liabilities Net
    2010 £9m £13m -£4m
    2011 £19m £51m -£32m
    2012 £34m £53m -£19m
    2013 £56m £89m -£33m
    2014 £113m £149m -£36m

    The best one can say about these figures, Robert, is that they are admirably consistent. With the exception of that disastrous 2011, from which Canonical recovered very well, they still demonstrate one very obvious and not really surprising fact:

    The more Shuttleworth pours into this money pit, the more he loses.

    I know how much you love fitting five points to a graph. Perhaps you could do so on this set of data?

    It’s now a ~£100 million company.

    On what basis?

    It isn’t even publicly quoted, for goodness’ sake.

  44. dougman says:

    Woe to you Win-Dohs users!

    “…when we asked how to adjust the microphone setting, she said we’d need to sign up for a $19.99 per month software support service to find out.”

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/pc-tech-support-telling-customers-to-avoid-windows-10/
    http://www.laptopmag.com/articles/support-reps-diss-windows-10

    LOL…people can whine all about the problems they are having, but do recall that they do not own the OS, nor can anyone file a class action lawsuit…jokes on you chump!

  45. olderman says:

    “They could exceed break-even any time they wanted by reducing growth a bit but that’s not the current goal.”

    A company whose liabilities have been increasingly exceeding their assets for 5 years now is not to me in the most robust of health. Nor IMHO is it one that can just break even as if by magic.

    Then again I don’t need to believe in the FOSSTard tooth fairy as you do.

  46. kurkosdr wrote, “a company like Canonical, demanding constant cash injections from founders and misguided venture capitalists.”

    Canonical and Ubuntu GNU/Linux is not a short term project just watching the horizon. They are steadily growing and the investors don’t care about the bottom line more than they care about that growth. Canonical is very nearly self-sufficient. For the last few years, total current assets have been doubling annually while liabilities have been increasing at half that rate. It’s now a ~£100 million company. They could exceed break-even any time they wanted by reducing growth a bit but that’s not the current goal.

  47. kurkosdr says:

    Where, precisely, do you see the problem?

    As a guess, that Microsoft tries to find ways to increase shareholder value and is not a company like Canonical, demanding constant cash injections from founders and misguided venture capitalists.

    Also, don’t forget that a key piece of FOSSie propaganda is that all big proprietary software companies are destined to fail, and hence FOSSies constantly try to find patterns to assign to that rule. Case in point:
    http://m.linuxjournal.com/article/9911
    (search in page for unsuistainable, I don’t want to ruin it for you)
    For those minds, “Microsoft issues debt” immediately translates to “Microsoft is enslaved/trapped/whatever”

  48. DrLoser says:

    So, is your point that M$ is somehow cheating (possibly true, but hardly unique) on off-shore profits?

    Or that M$ desperately needs that $13 billion for “day to day” expenses?

    It’s possible to hold both positions, I suppose.

    But then you would be nothing more than Fifi Mark II.

  49. DrLoser says:

    That’s legal, for now

    And when it is no longer legal, then Microsoft, and all US corporations, will find a different yet still legal way.

    Which is irrelevant. You still haven’t addressed the central issue here, Robert. That $13 billion is a perfectly reasonable financial transaction if you are a huge healthy US company.

    Where, precisely, do you see the problem?

  50. DrLoser says:

    Just to help you out here, Robert, I believe that the US tax on “repatriated” corporate income is “up to” 35%. You and I both know that there are loopholes that would reduce that. But let’s stick to 35%.

    In the completely absurd and brain-dead circumstance that “day-to-day” activities would require M$ to “repatriate” money from abroad — and remember, we are talking about highly liquid investments, which means that they could do it in half an hour or less — we are talking about a hit of $17.5 billion in actual cost.

    Leaving M$ with a mere $82.5 billion out there in never-never land for sundry purposes.

    Yeah, Robert. That would really sting, wouldn’t it?

  51. DrLoser wrote, “Your thesis is that M$ is losing money hand over fist and needs to issue expensive bonds just to cope with the hideous day to day expenses of enslaving desktop users.”

    No, it’s that M$ is avoiding USAian taxes by keeping revenue offshore and borrowing money to reward investors. That’s legal, for now… Governments all over the world are getting annoyed at some rich, high-profit companies reporting income in some nook offshore. There could well be international agreement to stifle the practice sooner or later. It’s an election-issue in USA today. Just ask Trump.

  52. DrLoser says:

    It’s the desktop monopoly that is a house of cards. That’s what, 15% of M$ these days?

    Presumably, then, you have no problem with Microsoft “enslaving” computer users and businesses in general … but a devout belief that Microsoft should stop “enslaving” desktop users?

    Which, by the way, makes no sense whatsoever on your OP. Your thesis is that M$ is losing money hand over fist and needs to issue expensive bonds just to cope with the hideous day to day expenses of enslaving desktop users.

    I think we’ve all been able to trash your ignorant concept of how corporate finances work, so perhaps we can leave the OP to fester in it’s own little dung-heap of uninformed ignorance.

    However, this 85/15 split intrigues me. Let’s say that M$ completely abandons the desktop tomorrow. (Impractical, so let’s assume a lingering corporate support and eventual FLOSS for everything else.)

    Are you saying that you would be happy to see Microsoft continue to earn megabucks on the remaining 85% of their operations?

    I mean, you seem a little confused on your projected end-game here.

  53. DrLoser says:

    That supposedly desperate need to pay day-to-day expenses?

    That required issuance of $13 billion in long-term senior securities?

    That one? I mean, that one is the one we are talking about, isn’t it, Robert?

    As of September 30, 2015, we had $10.0 billion of commercial paper issued and outstanding, with a weighted-average interest rate of 0.18% and maturities ranging from 21 days to 91 days.

    Oh dear. How sad. Your entire argument collapses.

    Apparently it has always been trivially easy for Microsoft to issue short-term debt — defined as “fits within a quarterly report” — to the value of, well, I think $10 billion is quite enough, but then again I am not the proud possessor of a totally broken bodged-up self-assembly Chinese tractor that has “power steering” that would only really work if you ran it on rails … or perhaps I’ve misunderstood the concept of Boolean power steering?

    But, hey. I know about as much of power steering as you do about basic corporate financial transactions, Robert.

  54. DrLoser says:

    … but, of course, I missed something, didn’t I? One possible purposing of the newly acquired senior debt is:

    …and repayment of existing debt.

    These people are truly evil. Devious, too.

    Who would have even considered the possibility that “paying off existing debt” with a coupon of, say, 2.5%, by acquiring new debt to the same maturity at a coupon of, say, 0.18%?

    Obviously a large American corporation with nothing left to do but … er … save a whale of money over the next twenty years or so.

    Not Robert Pogson, that’s for sure.

    Incidentally, are you considering a fifth career as a Financial Advisor?

    If so, as your friend and ally, I would counsel against such a choice. Mattresses. Mattresses. That’s the way it works in Manitoba.

  55. DrLoser says:

    I’ve never written that. It’s the desktop monopoly that is a house of cards. That’s what, 15% of M$ these days? They could retire tomorrow and live off their cash for decades.

    What you never wrote is not a bone of contention, Robert. What is the subject of contention, here, is what you did write. A matter of a few days ago, in fact.

    Your first assertion is that:

    It’s kind of embarassing to have to borrow money to pay debts… but that’s what M$ continues to do.

    This assertion is plainly false. Microsoft does not have any debts requiring borrowing to be paid off. (I’m not sure it has had any since, oh, say, 1980?)

    Furthermore, in the presently non-existent case that Microsoft has debts that need to be paid off … they were not, are not, and will not be compelled to borrow money in order to do so. Which is a pretty extraordinary way for anybody, corporate or otherwise, to “pay off debts,” if you think about it, Robert, which you evidently didn’t.

    In that non-existent circumstance, Microsoft could trivially use some of their liquid and highly convertible assets. This is, not to bang on about it, why corporations value liquid and highly convertible assets.

    Apparently you are just as ignorant of the concept of “liquidity” as you are of the concept of “senior debt” … I’d bring the concept of “coupon” in here, but I don’t want to tax your minuscule understanding of bean-counting too hard. Given your choice of PRC duct-tape do-it-yourself rototiller, I’m not entirely sure you understand what an “asset” is, either. But that would be a different conversation.

    Once again, your proposition is plainly false.

    It has $100 billion in liquid assets but it can’t repatriate them to USA without forking out a ton of money to Uncle Sam for taxes …

    This proposition, unlike your others, requires a bit of looking into the 10-Q report itself. You are presumably relying on the following:

    Of the cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments at September 30, 2015, $96.0 billion was held by our foreign subsidiaries and would be subject to material repatriation tax effects. The amount of cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments held by foreign subsidiaries subject to other restrictions on the free flow of funds (primarily currency and other local regulatory) was $2.1 billion.

    This is indeed interesting. It implies that Microsoft is deliberately holding a very large amount of liquid assets abroad, rather than repatriating those assets and taking a tax hit. Gosh, World Domination through a cash-pile of almost $100 billion! Who’d a thunk?

    Anyway, back to the parlous state of M$ finances in the good ole “not quite Canada, and pretty offensive in general to Robert Pogson, except where Robert Pogson feels the need to defend them against M$” USA …

    …so it borrows money at this end to pay for what it does day to day.

    The salient point here, Robert, is that M$ issued $13 billion in senior debt. That’s the only thing we can tell from the 10-Q. But since it’s a 10-Q, the reasoning behind that action is presented for all to see:

    We issued debt to take advantage of favorable pricing and liquidity in the debt markets, reflecting our credit rating and the low interest rate environment. The proceeds of these issuances were or will be used for general corporate purposes, which may include, among other things, funding for working capital, capital expenditures, repurchases of capital stock, acquisitions, and repayment of existing debt. See Note 11.

    In other words, it’s cheap and we can use it all over the shop … although, you will note, not for paying down (nonexistent) debt and not for your preposterous and abjectly farcical suggestion of “what it does day to day.”

    I close with a verbatim quote on “Note 11.”

    Short-term Debt

    As of September 30, 2015, we had $10.0 billion of commercial paper issued and outstanding, with a weighted-average interest rate of 0.18% and maturities ranging from 21 days to 91 days. As of June 30, 2015, we had $5.0 billion of commercial paper issued and outstanding, with a weighted-average interest rate of 0.11% and maturities ranging from 8 days to 63 days. The estimated fair value of this commercial paper approximates its carrying value.

    We have two $5.0 billion credit facilities that expire on November 4, 2015 and November 14, 2018, respectively. These credit facilities serve as a back-up for our commercial paper program. As of September 30, 2015, we were in compliance with the only financial covenant in both credit agreements, which requires us to maintain a coverage ratio of at least three times earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization to interest expense, as defined in the credit agreements. No amounts were drawn against these credit facilities during any of the periods presented.

    Long-term Debt

    As of September 30, 2015, the total carrying value and estimated fair value of our long-term debt, including the current portion, were $28.6 billion and $29.2 billion, respectively. This is compared to a carrying value and estimated fair value of our long-term debt of $30.3 billion and $30.5 billion, respectively, as of June 30, 2015. These estimated fair values are based on Level 2 inputs.

    Precisely how you imagine any of that to be a major burden to a company with a market cap of $438.22 billion (as of today), Robert, is a mystery to me.

    I mean, let’s face it here. You are claiming, on the back of no evidence whatsoever, that M$ felt the desperate need to borrow $13 billion in order to pay “day to day” expenses. Ludicrous..

    I, on the other hand, am making the perfectly reasonable assumption that, if somebody offers the chance to issue a senior bond on a 20 year maturity — I’m guessing here — at a coupon … I promised not to mention the word coupon, but I lied, I lied … of 0.18% … then there are plenty of means for a successful US Corporation to deploy that $13 billion at a decent Return On Investment.

    Strangely enough, “paying off day to day expenses” isn’t really one of them. Or did you seriously think that the $13 billion in question just vanished into thin air and was completely off the balance sheet?

    Pray tell us no. One Fifi is enough.

  56. kurkosdr wrote, “Pog (who is convinced Microsoft is a house of cards held together by Enron accounting*)”

    I’ve never written that. It’s the desktop monopoly that is a house of cards. That’s what, 15% of M$ these days? They could retire tomorrow and live off their cash for decades.

  57. kurkosdr says:

    @Deaf Spy

    Wow! That was a surprisingly well written explanation. But, aiming it at Pog (who is convinced Microsoft is a house of cards held together by Enron accounting*) is like aiming it at the folks over at TheEconomicCollapseBlog (enter at your own risk).

    It’s like trying to explain Voltaire’s sayings to a fundamentalist Islamist.

    * I ‘d love to see how the world looks like from inside the Pog head. But only for a couple of minutes.

  58. Deaf Spy says:

    Sigh. DEBT!

    Pogson, I am afraid you mistaken this “debt” with the debt you got from your brother-in-law to buy your rototiller.

    First, this debt has maturity. It is expected to be paid back at a certain moment in time and not a day sooner. Second, it is backed by the formidable income of the company. DrLoser properly pointed out that debt is a nice instrument, and sometimes much more convenient to use than spend your own cash reserves.

    Let me give you another example. I have some money invested in stocks. Imagine I urgently need 3000 USD to buy a new, hm, a new “beast” home PC, with Xeon CPU, 32Gigs RAM, two SSDs in RAID 1, you get the idea. I don’t have 3000 USD in cash. I have two options: sell some of the stocks (and lose the dividend I get paid for holding them), or take my MasterCard Gold and make a debt to my bank. Doing some quick math in mind, I can assure you I will choose option two.

    And not only that. My bank is constantly trying to convince me to sell me a new credit – to buy a properly, or a car, or whatever. At the same time, I have a neighbor who can’t persuade the same bank to lend him even 100 bucks. I believe you can guess why.

  59. kurkosdr says:

    Obviously, you are NOT doing it correctly. Perhaps you should get a Win-Dows mobile device?

    Does it work for you? Either you have an old ICS device and are stuck in an old version, or haven’t updated to the newest version of Chrome for Android.

    What is I am not doing correctly, oh wise dogbrain?

  60. dougman says:

    Obviously, you are NOT doing it correctly. Perhaps you should get a Win-Dows mobile device?

  61. kurkosdr says:

    Setting-> Display -> Auto-rotate screen.

    Use your dogbrain to read my previous post and see I have it enabled, duh.

  62. dougman says:

    Setting-> Display -> Auto-rotate screen.

    DUH.

  63. kurkosdr says:

    kurkosdr Android + Youtube + Chrome + what device. I have a nexus device from 2013 that has no problem with Youtube.

    Galaxy S3, Android 4.3, YouTube on Chrome doesn’t have a fullscreen button (it used to have on the previous version). You have to open the YouTube app and leave the site the video was embedded in, then come back. Otherwise no fullscreen for you.

    Needless to say, I tried all the usual stuff, turning the phone sideways with screen rotation on, tapping and double tapping on the video, checking for a hidden control, checking for a hidden control in the notification bar… nothing.

    Also, video ocassionally stutters. I wonder if they worked-around Stagefright by disabling hardware acceleration and doing it only on software, or it’s the usual “Google thing” of doing all-sorts of amazing things and immediately afterwards failing to count how many fingers their right hand has.

  64. oiaohm says:

    Robert Pogson that is the interesting thing. Android is not really suited to like the Prison or the high security network model. So even that Android market share has grown document cases of GNU/Linux migrations have also increased.

    What is also interesting is most of the places with large documented GNU/Linux migrations see nothing change in stats-counter. Of course this kinda makes sense when you work out GNU/Linux usage is more likely to be high security behind deep packet inspection.

  65. oiaohm wrote about the desktop and */Linux.

    Obviously, it’s not GNU/Linux that’s obsolete but the old boxes on which that That Other OS Ran. They are declining while GNU/Linux and Android/Linux increase share at a great rate.

  66. oiaohm says:

    http://www.itwire.com/business-it-news/open-source/70119-prisonpc-how-linux-plays-a-useful-role-behind-bars

    What is interesting is this is 0.1-0.2 percent of the Australian population.

    Also the year of the Linux Desktop arguement need to end.
    http://linuxfestnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/slides/Year%20of%20the%20Linux%20Desktop.pdf

    Question now is if the Full Open Source Desktops will get up. As we can see in high security like drone control, Nuke submarines and Prisons the Full Open Source Desktop is getting foot holds everywhere.

    kurkosdr Android + Youtube + Chrome + what device. I have a nexus device from 2013 that has no problem with Youtube.

  67. dougman wrote, “Users of Windows 7 & 8 will be forced upgraded and then droves of people will complain and leave M$ for good.”

    At the very least people are no longer going to skip reading the damned EULA from Hell because it will cost them time and money.

  68. dougman says:

    Considering that the only egg in the basket long-term for M$, that has any future revenue growth is namely Win-dows 10. Which is the version that everyone is rejecting and hating on, uptake has stalled. Users of Windows 7 & 8 will be forced upgraded and then droves of people will complain and leave M$ for good.

  69. oldfart wrote, “Out of curiosity exactly Which version of windows was that experience based on Robert Pogson?”

    I don’t really remember.I remember now, it was Lose ’95. It was about the time of XP but on “Computers for Schools” machines which tend to come with the previous version of TOOS, but these machines were in storage somewhere a long time. They arrived in my community by ship and appeared with no notice to me in the computer lab. I only found them by accident, poking around in boxes… It was pretty solid hardware, though, HP stuff.

  70. kurkosdr wrote, “MrPogson and Microsoft fanbots don’t understand that once the market picks it’s major platforms, it’s over. After that, it’s like trying to sell an HD-DVD player.”

    The market never picked TOOS. M$ got a sweet deal from IBM for the OS on IBM-compatible PCs. M$ leveraged that monopoly for decades. However, that’s crumbling thanks to the injection of new technology making everyone and their dog aware of alternatives. The OEMs and retailers can no longer afford to ignore alternatives to TOOS.

  71. kurkosdr says:

    Will it be more interesting than 2015?

    Kinda like the YearOfTheWindowsPhone/Mobile, which has it’s moment since 2010, right?

    MrPogson and Microsoft fanbots don’t understand that once the market picks it’s major platforms, it’s over. After that, it’s like trying to sell an HD-DVD player.

    Google is doing to Microsoft what Microsoft has been doing to Desktop Linux since 1998. It’s fun to see Microsoft having to plead developers to add to their ecosystem. Even if Android is a POS OS that barely works with Google’s own services (YouTube doesn’t play well on Chrome) it’s fun to watch

  72. oldfart says:

    “That happened for me 15 years ago when I realized that M$ and it’s OS did not work for me, breaking down hourly”

    Out of curiosity exactly Which version of windows was that experience based on Robert Pogson?

  73. DrLoser wrote, “When does reality kick in?”

    That happened for me 15 years ago when I realized that M$ and it’s OS did not work for me, breaking down hourly. Others may realize what’s happening when they face the bills M$ will send them for “10”. Others may already be hating the bottom line and forced upgrades. It’s all good. Whatever works to break the monopoly…

  74. DrLoser kept on losing with “Not “about half” at all.”

    Sigh. DEBT! The ~$100billion are their liquid assets. They are borrowing an additional $13billion to add to their past debt reported in the 10-Q. That was $10billion short term and $27.8billion long term, a total of $37 billion. Combined with the new debt they get to $50 billion which is about half…

  75. DrLoser says:

    Calling anybody out there. Anybody who has the faintest understanding of accountancy?

    Never mind. We have Robert, who has none:

    At the last 10-Q quarterly report, M$ reported $36billion in short+long term debt. Now about half it’s liquid assets will be needed just to repay that debt.

    Well, it’s your cite, Robert. You can’t really complain if I quote from it, can you?

    “Cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments totaled $99.4 billion as of September 30, 2015, compared with $96.5 billion as of June 30, 2015. Equity and other investments were $11.4 billion as of September 30, 2015 compared with $12.1 billion as of June 30, 2015. Our short-term investments are primarily to facilitate liquidity and for capital preservation. They consist predominantly of highly liquid investment-grade fixed-income securities, diversified among industries and individual issuers.”

    That appears to be significantly more than the $13 billion in senior notes, Robert. By a ratio of, let’s see, drags out handy Microsoft Windows calculator and divides 99.4 by 13 … oh, look. Not “about half” at all. In fact the notes are covered more than seven times over.

    Which might explain why the market is prepared to buy $13 billion in senior notes in the first place, Robert. Apparently, and I have no idea what the maturity of these notes are, they are actually a very well-covered, extremely liquid, investment.

    Or did you just assume that there’s a Joe Palooka out there with $13 billion burning a hole in his obviously capacious pockets and a completely unfounded belief in the ability of a major US corporation to pay those notes back?

    As might have occurred to you, Robert … if only you put a modicum of thought into this sort of thing …

    For every seller, there must be a buyer.

  76. DrLoser says:

    2016 will be the most interesting year for the Desktop.

    Will it be more interesting than 2015?
    Or 2014?
    Or 2013?
    Or 2012?
    Or 2011?
    Or 2010?
    Or 2009?
    Or 2008?
    Or 2007?
    Or 2006?
    Or 2005?
    Or 2004?
    Or 2003?
    Or 2002?
    Or 2001?
    Or 2000?
    Or even before then?

    How long is this futile stupid pretense going to last?

    When does reality kick in?

  77. DrLoser says:

    You haven’t quite figured out what “senior notes” and so on mean, have you, Robert?

    Without going into any great detail, may I gently explain the reason for M$ to buy the things?

    “Senior notes are relatively secure because of their priority status in the event of liquidation. With this added security comes a reduced interest or coupon rate as compared to junior bonds.”

    To put it very simply, senior notes are typically issued by companies in robust health because they are an extremely cheap option for the seller and a very liquid asset to the buyer. In this particular case, M$ apparently aim to use the senior notes in question to fund a buy-back of shares — something that is all the rage for US companies these days.

    In the current market, buy-backs are regarded by institutional investors — the only ones who count — as a Good Thing. They show that a company has confidence in itself. And in the case of M$, this has been a strategic proposition for at least (I forget exactly) the last five years. One could argue quite successfully that it has been a major factor in the corresponding rise of M$ shares over the last five years. ($25.69 to $54.15, since you didn’t ask.)

    Now, I know the question you want to ask here. If M$ is so successful, why can’t they fund this buy-back of shares in another way? Perhaps by cash-flow?

    At this point, unlike Fifi, I will admit that I don’t really know. But what I do know is that M$ could easily afford to chunk that $13 billion off even their annual cash-flow.

    So, why do they do it this way?
    1) Senior notes are presently a ridiculously cheap way of raising money. Blame the whole rest of the economy. Whatever. It’s a form of deferring future payment at practically no cost whatsoever.
    2) Tax efficiency.

    Aha! Tax efficiency! Maybe that’s the Smoking Gun here, Robert!

    Funny how a troll like me noticed it, and you didn’t.

  78. YY wrote, “2016 will be the year of the acknowledgement of the End of The Evil Empire Microsoft 😀”

    EOTEM, it’s almost a word… 😉 Emote is a word meaning, “A command used on talk systems and MUDs to indicate the performance of an action, usually a facial expression of emotional state.”

    So, it’s basically M$ making a face, anything but a smile in this case…

  79. Ivan wrote, “It’s like you’re grasping at straws claiming some massive debt within a corporation while simultaneously pointing to North Korea’s linux use as if that dictatorshit is somehow important.”

    No, those are two very different things except they show the monopoly is weakening. Otherwise there would be no debt and NK would use TOOS.

  80. Ivan says:

    It’s like you’re grasping at straws claiming some massive debt within a corporation while simultaneously pointing to North Korea’s linux use as if that dictatorshit is somehow important.

    :golf clap:

  81. YY says:

    2016 will be the most interesting year for the Desktop.

    With a level playing field for games (Steamboxes/SteamOS/Vulkan), major countries converting to GNU/Linux, all the Hardware manufacturers making Linux drivers, and now having reached the tipping point of general acknowledge and an increasing fast public acceptance of GNU/Linux as a safer and better OS, this last bastion of the M$ extortion machine will have to accept that it their criminal organisation is beginning to end. And when is going to happen, it will go very, very, fast because there will be no joy left for any party except M$ to continu.

    Now that retail has lost it’s incentive with Vista 10, there is no need nor joy to push Windows anymore. Instead there is a need to market a faster, safer, better, easier and more beautiful alternative and so the market will be divided by Apple, Google and GNU/Linux.

    2016 will be the year of the acknowledgement of the End of The Evil Empire Microsoft 😀

  82. dougman wrote, “Actually the cloud for M$ is being curtailed, due in part of curtailing unlimited storage….”

    Don’t feel too badly for M$. They’re just having to work for a living after decades of bloat, self-aggrandizement, and feeling entitled, like a three-year-old kid or a spoiled teenager. There will be pain as reality creeps in but they may eventually become a real business competing in the real world, or they might just spend their inheritance and end in jail. The choices are theirs.

  83. dougman says:

    Actually the cloud for M$ is being curtailed, due in part of curtailing unlimited storage.

    “Microsoft previously offered Office 365 subscribers unlimited space on their OneDrive cloud storage platform. Now, the company has announced that it’s reducing the limit to 1 TB, citing abuse from a small number of users, some of whom dropped 75 TB worth of data in Microsoft’s cloud. In addition, Microsoft is cutting the size of their limited storage plans. They used to offer 100 GB for $2/month and 200 GB for 4$/month. Those plans are being replaced with 50 GB for $2/month Microsoft is also decreasing the amount of space users get for free from 15 GB to 5 GB, and discontinuing the 15 GB camera roll bonus. These changes will roll out in “early 2016,” and users will have up to a year to get down under the new caps.”

    But in like turn, it would appear that darker clouds are beginning to appear over the Redmond campus. Windows 8 was worse than Vista, but Windows 10 far worse than 8 due to two words: Forced “updates”.

    http://www.computerworld.com/article/3000124/microsoft-windows/windows-10-growth-itbwcw.html

  84. ram says:

    In some countries it is (or at least was) illegal to borrow to pay dividends or buy back shares as that is the root of Ponzi schemes. Of course, the “economies” of some countries fundamentally ARE Ponzi schemes. The candidates will occur to you.

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