GNU/Linux Touted As Safe Replacement For Illegal Software In Bangladesh

“Replacement of pirated software by free/open-source equivalents has effectively saved Kazi Farms Group and Dhaka Tribune from any worry of potential future piracy raids and arrests. It has also saved a total of 800 x 40,000 = Tk3.2cr ($400,000) in software license fees.”
 
See Microsoft’s wake-up call on software piracy
In much of emerging markets, there is a huge local economy built by copying That Other OS illegally onto random PCs. As economies grow and become interconnected, these operations come onto M$’s radar and legal levers are applied to increase M$’s revenues. Rather than being $free, TOOS becomes expensive and/or risky. Along comes GNU/Linux, ready to take over. Expect a lot of growth in use of FLOSS now that much of Asia and Africa are thriving.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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12 Responses to GNU/Linux Touted As Safe Replacement For Illegal Software In Bangladesh

  1. oiaohm says:

    The cause of failure is induction. I should have said high oscillating magnetic field

    Well, just so everyone knows, USB sticks are not magnetic data carriers and will therefore not be damaged by stray or static magnetic fields.
    Stray true the will not be harmed. High repeating oscillation in microwave spectrum not great on particular types of silicon. Its the internal clock that normal busts not the flash storage area. Your data still there in the USB key just the controller chip is dead so you cannot access it.

    Planes are often struck by lightning, so if a flash drive were taped to the centre of a window there is some possibility of them being fried but I would not bet on it…
    Or near external aerial cable of an aerial that lightning happens to find. Most likely near (hacked in)mail cargo area is weather radar again.

    Robert Pogson yes a lot of USB keys go by aircraft there are factors that cause problem in Australia.

    Yes it true a magnet and a USB key is unlikely todo much harm.

    1) the controllers in most USB keys are not rated extremely high for EMF exposure. Yes the Flash media bit lives if it sheild the controller that does not.
    2) some of the aircraft in Australia used for mail are flying doctors cargo in those are nose area custom added. Why the normal cargo area of aircraft is consumed by medical gear. Issue comes from abnormal placement. When weather radar is in usage going into that section of the aircraft is off limits as it not safe for humans. Yes no food stuff or liquids either.

    Basically the USB key near microwave oven’s magnetron is worse than the weather radar but the source of problem is the same thing. less than 9 seconds of house hold Microwave exposure will normally kill the controller. 2 and a half hours of weather radar leakage does the same thing. Of course that slower exposure rate is not nasty enough to damage pressed DVDs in most cases but home produced DVD/bluray.. are also in hell from light microwaving.

    This is not a normal global problem. It a case of abnormally high EMF compared to any other normal mail transport method due to abnormal placement in aircraft. Of course there could be other places around the world with the same problem.

  2. dougman wrote, “USB sticks are not magnetic data carriers and will therefore not be damaged by stray or static magnetic fields.”

    Planes are often struck by lightning, so if a flash drive were taped to the centre of a window there is some possibility of them being fried but I would not bet on it…

  3. dougman says:

    Re: drives will not be exposed to a high magnetic field…high magnetic field is aircraft weather radar

    Well, just so everyone knows, USB sticks are not magnetic data carriers and will therefore not be damaged by stray or static magnetic fields. The data in a flash drive is stored as electric charges, and pieces of metal are given either an excess or a deficiency of electrons to hold its data.

  4. oiaohm wrote, ” There is no promise that the drives will not be exposed to a high magnetic field and some areas Australian Post is the only option. The source of the high magnetic field is aircraft weather radar.”

    Weather radar has nothing to do with high magnetic fields and a lot of mail goes by air with no problems whatsoever. RP B.SC. Honours Physics, M.Sc.

  5. oiaohm says:

    Robert Pogson some of those vendors will do USB flash drives. There is a issue with hard drives and flash drives going by Australian Post. There is no promise that the drives will not be exposed to a high magnetic field and some areas Australian Post is the only option. The source of the high magnetic field is aircraft weather radar.

    Some of the international disc suppliers to proper pressed dvd discs. These discs also tolerate higher and lower temperatures than normal burnt discs.

    Road/sea transport to some locations in Australia is once every 6 months.

    So some locations you need premade pressed discs due to poor Internet and Transport conditions. But there are more than enough suppliers of these.

  6. oiaohm wrote, “when I need pre-made disks I normally go through this list looking for who is shipping international and who is cost effective. Ordering 13+ dvd discs of debian is not exactly cheap.”

    A better alternative might be to arrange that a person with a fast connection create a USB drive with the needed packages and mail them. Then it’s a single small box. The entire repository can fit on a single large drive but most people only need a partial mirror and the mirror may be compressed a bit as well. Debian has packages to create partial mirrors and caches of packages used in particular installations. Debian is so much more flexible than That Other OS. Debian GNU/Linux works for people.

  7. oiaohm says:

    https://www.debian.org/CD/vendors/
    Ram when I need pre-made disks I normally go through this list looking for who is shipping international and who is cost effective. Ordering 13+ dvd discs of debian is not exactly cheap. Good buying is between 1 to 3 AUD a disc. Worst buying on that list is 20 dollars USD a disc.

    Works out that you can buy a set full set debian every year for 5 years to equal the price 1 Windows 10 OEM license.

    My biggest issue is that you need Internet to place order. I have done it by Australian dialup and sat before.

  8. ram says:

    Although I do wish full Linux distributions on hard media were more readily available. Many places in the world, such as Australia, have very limited (if any) connectivity. Online downloads are infeasible in such places. Of course, they are also infeasible for Microsoft.

  9. Mac Taylor wrote, “With a GNU/Linux install, you can usually install what’s needed in one shot.”

    Yep! In schools where I had a local archive of Debian GNU/Linux, I would do just a minimal installation, sometimes just an automatic installation, followed by distributing a list of packages and it was done. I could do this over random hardware in several generations and they all worked. Much easier than wait, please wait of that other OS.

  10. dougman says:

    Press install and in 5-mins you booting Linux.

  11. Mac Taylor says:

    You install windows, then you’ve got to hunt for the hardware drivers, then the virus-scanners, then all the other applications. Then update and hope nothing breaks.

    With a GNU/Linux install, you can usually install what’s needed in one shot.

  12. oiaohm says:

    I always find this fun. It was Bill Gates who said “As long as they’re going to steal it, we want them to steal ours. They’ll get sort of addicted, and then we’ll somehow figure out how to collect sometime in the next decade.”

    Its turning out being able to collect is far harder than Microsoft could dream and Microsoft addition is way weaker than Microsoft could hoped for at this point.

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