Xiaomi GNU/Linux Notebook In 2016

“For the notebook business, Xiaomi is planning to use the same strategy as the one for smartphones and will release notebooks with high price/performance ratio, the sources noted.
 
The sources believe Xiaomi will likely release a 15-inch notebook as it is the mainstream size in China and will adopt Linux operating system. The notebook is estimated to be priced at CNY2,999 (US$471) and will heap pressure on competitors’ similar products priced between CNY4,000-6,000.”
 
See Xiaomi said to release notebook in 2016 with help from Inventec and Foxconn
As I’ve been recommending for years, an OEM will release a notebook PC with GNU/Linux. They’ve seen the light. If M$ doesn’t get paid, they do. People will pay real money for a GNU/Linux desktop experience. OEMs that don’t whole-heartedly support GNU/Linux will lose out where it counts, in the market.

This is a real sign that competition has been restored to IT, that an OEM would even consider releasing a GNU/Linux product instead of one with that other OS. The motivation for entry into a market and participation in a market should be price/performance, not the wishes of a slave-master monopoly. It’s very interesting that the interloper is a maker of smartphones, the real personal computer of 2015. One company’s diversification is another company’s competition.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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16 Responses to Xiaomi GNU/Linux Notebook In 2016

  1. YY wrote, “China has now the whole hard- and software stack.” and some other good things.

    It’s true, China has hardware in about every domain but they still are not at the leading edge of hardware. That may be good enough but they are not quite self-sufficient in everything. I think that could come in a few years though. They are not that far behind. What they lack in quality they make up in quantity and price. Using GNU/Linux and thin clients puts them very close to the peak of efficiency for a lot of desktop work. They need to leverage higher performance CPUs, more efficient CPUs and tons of RAM and storage to where they can be independent. With the slowdown in their manufacturing growth this could be the opportunity to invest in more local production of hardware. They have such a huge local market that they could soon operate quite independently.

    So far, I have not seen much sign that China wants to dictate IT but security and costs may make that automatic. After India, I see China as being the next big thing in GNU/Linux development. Modernization and education are growing strongly in both nations. There’s no magic in USAian control of IT. Without the Wintel monopoly, China would already be self-sufficient in IT. That will happen soon.

  2. YY says:

    This is interesting but some are missing the big picture.

    China has now the whole hard- and software stack. From openPower to Linux to all the hard- and software. They are now replacing existing hard- and software at insane speed with domestic made. This is happening now, first with the crucial and essential places like defense, financial institutes and government.

    In the next few years we’ll hear news forbidding Intel, Windows, Oracle etc. from purchasing due to security reasons. This is an agreement and in cooperation with Putin/Russia. Government, private or business, none of them will have a choice.

    Whether you like it or not, the GNU/Linux desktop is already a fact to be seen soon and this is just about those two countries. India, Philippines, Brazil and many, many others see this fundamental security need and there is not an alternative!

    2016 will be the year of (the true beginning) of the Linux Desktop and many religious M$ slaves will experience the consequences of their stubbornness. The often mocked others, i.e. the early adopters, the smart ones and of course the new generation will laugh at them and think of these funny old anxious people for what they are: obsolete and otiose.

  3. ram says:

    Robert Pogson’s comment of September 2, 2015 at 1:10 pm is exactly correct.

    To that I would like to add that some IC manufacturers, such as Intel, do sell entire computers ready to run Linux (or with Linux preinstalled). They work very closely with the suppliers of the major Linux distributions.

  4. kurkosdr wrote, “you ‘d have the charts to prove it”.

    I’ve published lots of charts. Do an image-search of MrPogson.com. Find these fine articles:

    Yes, Folks, The Reign Of Wintel Has Ended
    Android/Linux Leaving That Other OS Behind In Emerging Markets
    Closing More Windows

  5. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr it funny.
    –What makes you think the OEMs won’t take the money from crapware and use it to pay for the hardware (instead of the OS license) as lenovo does with tablets?–
    We know they will. First Linux Netbooks were packed full of crapware and custom built Linux Distributions to house the crapware. Why we got into a habit of format them to ground.

    Lets not forget Microsoft has added a means to OEM to place a Windows .exe in BIOS that Windows 10 will run without asking you.

    http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/08/lenovo-used-windows-anti-theft-feature-to-install-persistent-crapware/

    kurkosdr I will give it a pain in ass to have to connect lenovo android tablet to a PC and use the adb shell to clean the bugger out. But compare to a Lenovo Windows 10 PC that no matter what you do(bar replacing the OS with Linux) the crapware is coming back.

    kurkosdr like it or not Android design is fairly sane so even OEM installs crapware there are ways to deal with it. Yes I will admit horible. I really don’t know what the people at Microsoft are on but some of the features they build OS core design are absolutely nuts. Like autorun exe from random flash drives, emails…. Now bios chips. Microsoft has not got better over the years.

    Some OEMs are major Crapware vendors with no worry about how much harm they do.

  6. kurkosdr says:

    Anyway… an answer to my post about crapware below?

  7. kurkosdr says:

    “Now sanctions are killing M$’s and “partners” cash-cows.”

    Even if they are killing partners [citations and sources needed], they are not killing Micro£osft (I reccomend GBP over USD, since the exchange rate is more favorable).

    Otherwise, you ‘d have the charts to prove it.

  8. ram wrote, “Sure is looking grim for Microsoft”

    Ah, those Russians! Sanctions are a double-edged sword. USA found they didn’t prevent Iran from going nuclear. Now sanctions are killing M$’s and “partners” cash-cows.

  9. kurkosdr says:

    ” In China there are many OEMs who will mix/match this or that hardware in rather generic white box ATX cases or standard plastic notebooks. Even a few thousand units justifies the effort. When you get to millions of units, the overhead is tiny. ”

    Doesn’t this also happen with Win? Didn’t solve the crapware problem.

    My point is that when it comes to crapware, “$free” makes no difference (as lenovo android tablets prove).

    The only solution is OS vendors designing/ordering their “signature” hardware.

  10. kurkosdr wrote, “Canonical/Debian/Mint can’t design their own hardware even if they wanted to. They have to beg to be pre-installed, much less design/order their own “signature” line. The only reason gnu/linux laptops don’t ship with a bunch of crapware is because the volume is so small it’s not worth the effort to negotiate crapware deals.”

    That’s false. In China there are many OEMs who will mix/match this or that hardware in rather generic white box ATX cases or standard plastic notebooks. Even a few thousand units justifies the effort. When you get to millions of units, the overhead is tiny. Many will slap on whatever labels the customer wants and include whatever software the customer wants. India, Raspberry PI, etc. have all done this rather publicly. The customer is in the driver’s seat and if the customer doesn’t want crapware it doesn’t happen or the relationship would terminate rapidly. If the small guys can do this, the big guys certainly can and still be competitive without any crapware. With all the ads flung from the web, there’s no need at all to scatter crapware all over the hardware.

  11. kurkosdr says:

    @dougman

    You post such a juicy tidbit (quote), and no link to article?

    Why??

    Oh and btw, what makes you think this won’t also happen with gnu/linux, if OEMs start offering gnu/linux at a large scale? (as of now, the gnu/linux volume they ship is so small it isn’t worth the effort to negotiate crapware deals).

    Let me inform you that my Lenovo A3500 android tab does ship with crapware like Norton Mobile and “assistants”, even though android is “$free”.

    What makes you think the OEMs won’t take the money from crapware and use it to pay for the hardware (instead of the OS license) as lenovo does with tablets?

    The only solution to this is for OS vendors to design their own hardware (ala Nexus and Signature) so customers have a clean option.

    But Canonical/Debian/Mint can’t design their own hardware even if they wanted to. They have to beg to be pre-installed, much less design/order their own “signature” line. The only reason gnu/linux laptops don’t ship with a bunch of crapware is because the volume is so small it’s not worth the effort to negotiate crapware deals.

  12. dougman says:

    14″ Chromebooks are going for $289, but ID10T trolls will says “That’s not a TRUE computer!”

    Fine, one can install a full Linux distro and BAM have “TRUE” a notebook for $289.

    But..but… MicroSh1t offers a 13″ model for $229!

    Well, thats fine and dandy, but lets explore what needs to be done once you turn the thing on.

    “Removing the crapware and adware took two hours, then another hour to install Windows update. Removed all the browser extensions and add-ons in IE and then installed Chrome in its place. Installed CCleaner and removed McAfee anti-virus so that I can just use HITMAN PRO and NOD32. Also removed a bunch of bloatware like Cisco wireless networking utilities like LEAP and Apple Bonjour. Removed the Realtek card reader software since it slows the card reader down. Then downloaded fresh Realtek card reader driver and manually installed the driver without using their setup program. I had to remove all the HP tools (support and registration) as well. They were intermittently hammering the CPU to 100% and other people in HP forums were complaining about this problem. Once uninstalled, the CPU usage problems went away.”

    Does that seem user friendly to you? LOL…..well MicroSh1t has you in mind!. Step right up and behold Signature PCs, dont want crapware? Sure thing!, just give us more money and we will offer you a device clean, just because we are nice guys.

  13. DrLoser says:

    Just one single question, Robert.
    Would you buy a 15″ notebook for $471?

  14. kurkosdr wrote, “You are aware that DigiTimes is a rag that reprints every wild rumour they hear in some factory floor in Asia, right?”

    Nope. Digitimes is plugged in to the Asian market from top to bottom. They speak the language, too. This was a rumour last year but it’s happening now.

    Further, K wrote, “Did those Ubuntu laptops resulted in the marketshare of Windows in China taking a dive? No?”

    Yes, a huge impact. GNU/Linux usage (share %)
    Date GNU/Linux
    2010 0.09
    2011 0.1
    2012 0.19
    2013 0.35
    2014 0.31
    2015 0.3

    I’d say usage more than doubled/trebled, say 0.1% of 200M PCs to 0.3% of 400M PCs. I know that’s still “small” but a million or so machines anchors millions of users, a foot in the door. Further, moves to ban That Other OS are taking root and a small increase in usage of GNU/Linux today can readily grow.

  15. kurkosdr says:

    You are aware that DigiTimes is a rag that reprints every wild rumour they hear in some factory floor in Asia, right?

    The fact they don’t even have a distro name, but they just say “GNU/Linux” is a dead giveaway that this is a wild rumour.

    And even if that rumour is true, how is this any different than the Ubuntu laptops that Canonical sells in China?

    Did those Ubuntu laptops resulted in the marketshare of Windows in China taking a dive? No?

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