M$ Is At It Again, Lying About Costs

“con OpenOffice la spesa annuale per singolo utente è stata stimata pari a oltre 500 Euro, ben superiore rispetto alla precedente spesa annuale per utente di Office pari a circa 118 Euro
 
Google’s Translation:with OpenOffice annual spending per user has been estimated at over 500 euros, much higher than the previous annual spending Office user of about 118 Euro”
 
See A Pesaro l’Ufficio a Cielo Aperto: grazie a Microsoft al Comune di Pesaro lo Smart Working è una realtà
Yes, right. If you believe a Free download and copying files costs more than paying M$ its $billions, I have a bridge in New York I can sell you…

No, of course, there are two sides to the story. The town of Pesaro did not do due diligence and they invented problems for OpenOffice.org by allowing staff to use a mix of ancient copies of that other office suite and OpenOffice.org. A switch to LibreOffice properly enforced would have fixed those problems. It’s a sign of the growing desperation of M$ over its dying monopoly that it would stoop so low to try to score points. You’d think they’d weigh the cost of seeing the truth juxtaposed with their lies on .eu sites widely read by governments in the region…

“Advocates of the use of free and open source software by public administrations decry the city’s decision. Pesaro has lost control over its infrastructure, and is further locking itself in to proprietary software. A well-organised migration to LibreOffice, closely related to OpenOffice, will over time save Pesaro lots of money.
 
Pesaro invented the EUR 300,000 cost of OpenOffice. They have the courage to say OpenOffice does not suit them, while ignoring the recommendations and the plans provided by the company that supported the software.”

See Free software advocates heckle town of Pesaro

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in technology and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

47 Responses to M$ Is At It Again, Lying About Costs

  1. dougman says:

    Re “Let’s consider another story: application start times. LibreOffice. I measured this in Windows 7, and in Ubuntu. SDD and HDD.”

    Yah a “story”, otherwise known as a fable, fiction..LOL… post pictures, or it did not happen!

  2. oiaohm says:

    In fact enabling zram/zswap under Linux can give larger boosts at times than installing a sata base SSD.

    DDR3 ram socket SSD is not 50 dollars and that thing truly speeds Linux up a lot.

  3. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy depends how long a system stays up as well. Libreoffice is not that bad on Linux. Linux caching to ram is way more aggressive than windows.

    Libreoffice default ubuntu can be slow. I have background documentation conversion for archiving. So in boot libreoffice is loaded by that process.

    So its not black and white. Alfresco uses uses Libreoffice directly. It is very rare for Windows users to be running Libreoffice as part of a service.

    –And LO is something home users may start every day, even many times per day.–

    Many times a day is that between reboots or not. If home user under Linux has only hibernated Libreoffice has high odds of being in ram after the first start.

    Linux ram behavior is major different to Windows. 50 dollars is 8G more ram.

    1G is enough to accelerate a 1TB drive. So its quite a tricky balancing act.

  4. Deaf Spy says:

    That’s just about irrelevant to normal usage of a PC.
    Says the man who complains constantly about loss productivity caused by long boot times, “re-re-reboots” and so on.

    But let’s agree boot times are indeed irrelevant. Gosh, me and a few others have been telling you this for years already, so I am totally for it.

    Let’s consider another story: application start times. LibreOffice. I measured this in Windows 7, and in Ubuntu. SDD and HDD. Considering that LO starts slow as a hog on any platform, SSD makes quite some difference. And LO is something home users may start every day, even many times per day.

    Again, a $50 SSD is the most price/performance efficient way to upgrade the overall performance of your old PC.

    Twist and squirm as much as it pleases you, Pogson. You are facing hard times proving that SSDs do not add to the overall PC performance. Very hard times.

  5. dougman says:

    Deaf Guy is an idiot and a liar, attempting to say that my posts are irrelevant is just their way to deflect.

    The salient point being, this is a anti-MS blog, where people get to freely bash M$ at any given chance. Also, M$ clearly lies about costs even with Windows 10.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2015/08/05/windows-10-charging/

  6. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy I guess by the way you are talking you have not used lvm cache.

    Clean installing on ssd is not the only option or without its problems.
    https://wiki.debian.org/SSDOptimization
    Windows Idiots go on with SSD solve everything.

    http://blog.kylemanna.com/linux/2014/07/28/disk-caching-kernel-tree-benchmarks-using-dm-cache–lvmcache/

    Deaf Spy the reality here Linux we have 3 options not 2.
    1 Install on HDD
    2 Install on SSD
    3 Install on HDD and use SSD as cache.
    Interesting enough the performance difference between SSD pure(2) and SSD as cache(3) is not large at all. Storage size on the other hand is another matter.

    Notice in the debian instructions if you go pure SSD you must at all cost avoid swap thrashing the hell out the SSD.

    Deaf Spy yes telling a Linux person to install on SSD and install on Harddrive shows you don’t understand the crowd you are talking to.

    Linux users can use those 50 dollar drives safely as cache. Yet if a Windows user is using a 50 dollar drive it might look good at first but long term you will regret it if it not a laptop. Bang vs buck. Best bang for buck is use both SSD and HDD. If you follow the white papers for every 1G of SSD you can have 1TB up to of HDD storage and remain effective. So 128GB SSD is provide a performance boost to up to a 128TB HDD array.

    –For the record, I have done it with Vista, 7, 8m, 8.1, 10 Ubuntu 14 and CentOS. Have you, or any of the monkeys about done that? —
    I have done it against the 3 configurations under Debian and Centos. To Linux users I would not be recommending wasting the time reformatting if they are already installed in LVM. Instead just buy a SSD and install it as LVM Cache. 90 percent of the SSD boost with way less effort. Yes buy the cheapest SSD as a Cache the fact it screws up does not matter that much.

    If Deaf Spy knew topic that would be one thing. Linux and Windows have different disc storage options. SSD usage in Linux is different to Windows.

  7. Deaf Spy wrote, “Clean install an OS (Windows, Linux, you choose). Measure boot times with HDD and with SSD. Tell them here, and then I will be curious to see if you have the guts to repeat the non-sense above.”

    That’s just about irrelevant to normal usage of a PC. Beast has been up two days since my last kernel rebuild (4.1.4). LTS kernels are released a couple of times a month typically. What benefit would I have from an SSD since? None. I only load tiny applications. Everything else is cached in RAM (1.2gB cached at the moment), much faster than SSD. I have nothing in swap.

  8. Deaf Spy wrote, “If $50 is expensive for you, then you should not upgrade your software to start with. And it also means you extract no value from your computer. None.”

    Being deaf, I guess he doesn’t get that I’m retired and cash flow is limited here. I do get a lot of value out of Beast but Beast certainly would not benefit much from SSD. I rarely load anything but data from the web into RAM. This blog mostly originates on Beast. It has some value. My communication with extended family mostly hinges on Beast. The Little Woman and I both run on Beast all day long. There’s lots of value there. Performance is great except for a few silly websites. RAM is our chief bottleneck. The browser really chokes 4gB. TLW tends to open 20 sites and walk away despite those sites running Flashy ads and auto-updating… I tend to stick to a few sites: e-mail, blog, a few current sites on top of mind. I suppose building kernels would be the only task to benefit much from SSD. I do that once a month or so.

  9. Deaf Spy says:

    Yes, that’s often the right solution
    That is certainly one way of looking at it… And it is totally wrong.

    I suggest you make an experiment. One computer. Clean install an OS (Windows, Linux, you choose). Measure boot times with HDD and with SSD. Tell them here, and then I will be curious to see if you have the guts to repeat the non-sense above.

    For the record, I have done it with Vista, 7, 8m, 8.1, 10 Ubuntu 14 and CentOS. Have you, or any of the monkeys about done that?

    Or, Pogson, do you tell one of your make-believe stories again? You know, like the one how an Android tablet plugged to TV is a perfect PC replacement for word-processing.

  10. Deaf Spy wrote, “Spend $50 on 2TB HDD – okay, more storage, no increase in speed whatsoever.”

    Yes, that’s often the right solution, say, when the hard drive was full and fragmented. Not having to seek all over creation to find/create a file does save a lot of time.

  11. dougman linked to someone who wrote, “There’s no formal or informal program of systemic performance improvement. We started caring about security because pre-SP3 Windows XP was an existential threat to the business. Our low performance is not an existential threat to the business.”

    I can relate to that. I used XP for some of my teaching career. The long list of “can’t touch that’s” is informative. If you get the world to depend on your buggy software, you are just as locked in as the users… M$ is nailed its coffin shut from the inside. They didn’t have to do that but when the company is run by salesmen, that’s what you get. When your “selling points” are no space left for competing OS on retail shelves and a bunch of useless “features” that’s what you get. What’s really weird is that the world of business is the most locked in segment and knows it’s a slave but largely has yet to escape despite numerous opportunities. Government, education, health, mobile, have all headed for the exits but business still treats M$’s tax as a cost of doing business rather than a waste. It could take another decade to make a serious dent in the lock-in but we are patient people…

  12. oiaohm wrote, ” New drives can bigger caches. So no increase in speed can be false more often than not. Ok not much of a increase in speed.” and other good stuff.

    The fact is a modern hard drive is fast enough for most consumers. They load an application and ride it for days, the web browser. Even on mobile devices they are not rebooting very often, except for That Other OS. They do constantly need new storage. In my home all my typing barely scratches the surface of the hard drive while The Little Woman is striving to fill it up with downloads, images and videos. She has her own hard drive on Beast… I’ve been using the same 500gB RAID 1 array for many years.

    The real bottleneck on performance in my home are websites with dozens of downloads and huge scripts running on multiple dynamic websites. The browser is using 80% of RAM when both of us are going at it. I’d bet every PC made in the last decade struggles to keep browsers happy. It seems browsers have switched from caching tons of stuff on local hard drives to assuming RAM is there in order to maximize speed. Web sites have assumed RAM and CPU are no problems but they are. There are websites I don’t allow to load fully, just checking the headlines, like CNN.com. Those devils keep loading ads and videos for ages. I hate to see a browser wait, wait, waiting for ads to load. Try scrolling around on a site that’s constantly changing for a good fraction of a minute… Try that on an old feeble CPU and the computer is almost unusable until the page has loaded. With Flash, the pain continues… No SSD is going to help that much.

    SSDs do have their place but they are not a panacea for consumers yet. The cost and reliability aren’t right yet.

  13. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy 128GB SSD drive as lvm_cache you link to about 100TB of storage.

    –1. Add more memory – expensive, memory is probably DDR2, and it is unlikely there are any free slots on the motherboard.–
    Wa Linux people here. Ram does not just go on Motherboard. Raid controllers take ram as well.

    http://www.sandisk.com.au/enterprise/ulltradimm-ssd/ Also ssd does not equal sata connected all the time either. Court fighting is delaying access to these. Yes the in DDR3 ssd drives leave the sata ssd drives for dust.

    –3. Spend $50 on 2TB HDD – okay, more storage, no increase in speed whatsoever.–
    Not always true. New drives can bigger caches. So no increase in speed can be false more often than not. Ok not much of a increase in speed.

    Lets take a few things into account here. Large server setups have put recommend cache size around 1/1000 that is 1G of flash to 1TB of spining media.

    –“Spend $50 on a 128 GB SSD, install the OS and all apps and settings on it, ”–

    Linux user assign 128GB ssd as lvm caches (Dm cache) to existing spinning media. Get most of the performance boost without reinstalling and able to use the cheaper media.

    You don’t get a decent safe 128SSD for $50 dollars. Realistic value to buy a ssd rated for desktop that is Intel or Seagate is 100-200 for 128GB.

    Please note you can get a 128SSD rated for laptop for $50. Important difference internal device battery backup. Deaf Spy the For Desktop are critical words. Now a Linux user wanting to use the SSD for a Dm_cache we can use the laptop/desktop versions without disaster risk. Installing OS on a SSD on a desktop computer it better be desktop/server rated not a laptop edition.

    Cost to production is about 50 dollars to make ssd drive safe for power disruption.

    Deaf Spy Please go away and do some reading on the differences between desktop/server vs laptop SSD before commenting any more on this so you can get your prices right
    100-150 to increase performance is still quite an acceptable value.

  14. Deaf Spy says:

    I know I can rely on you to go totally irrelevant and stupid into any discussion, Doggie. Please, step aside and leave it to people with brain cells have their chat.

  15. dougman says:

    “”I Contribute to the Windows Kernel. We Are Slower Than Other Operating Systems. Here Is Why.””

    Too long to post here, but worth a read..LOL.

    http://blog.zorinaq.com/?e=74

  16. dougman says:

    “Spend $50 on a 128 GB SSD, install the OS and all apps and settings on it, ”

    LOL… what windows idiot bothers to reinstall their OS, according your M$ trolls no one needs to do that!

    But lets assume otherwise; Jim should just install Linux as it is no cost, on the existing drive and partition off the / and /home

    Jim just saved $50 and earned a huge performance up-tick. No more crashes, reboots and malware…all that silly nonsense is gone like the wind.

  17. Deaf Spy says:

    Yes, and the consumer, the guy who compares price/performance, can get 2048gB magnetic disc storage for ~$50.

    And how exactly is a 2GB magnetic HDD making your PC any faster? OS ignored. Performance, Pogson, you said it, not capacity. Improve performance. That means – computer does the stuff you use it for faster than before.

    Now, imagine a very real case. Jim has a okayish PC at home already: some Core Duo @ 2GHz, 1 TB disk already, 4 GBs RAM, standard stuff. Doesn’t even need a 64 bit OS. Now, he wants to make his PC run much, much faster. The options are:
    1. Add more memory – expensive, memory is probably DDR2, and it is unlikely there are any free slots on the motherboard.
    2. Upgrade CPU – useless, hardly possible due to the mb again.
    3. Spend $50 on 2TB HDD – okay, more storage, no increase in speed whatsoever.
    4. Spend $50 on a 128 GB SSD, install the OS and all apps and settings on it, keeping all data on the existing HDD. App starting times, swapping and multitasking performance is increased manifold.

    Tell me, Pogson, if you’re Jim, what’d you do?

  18. dougman says:

    When was the last time I installed a M$ OS? Oh last week… I cracked a copy of Windows 7 and updated it to Windows 10. M$ operating systems are like toys to me, I treat them as such.

    Do remember, I was the one that had a computer business and the times I posted for installation was based on former and current experiences.

  19. Deaf Spy wrote, “You can get a 128GB SSD for $50”.

    Yes, and the consumer, the guy who compares price/performance, can get 2048gB magnetic disc storage for ~$50.

  20. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy the hour cliam is correct. If you know what you are doing with Windows 8/8.1 you can get it installed from Whitebox OEM/Retail disc to SSD in under 15 mins.

    — Installation of upgrades, patches and multiple reboots–
    That can be helped by using wsus off-line.

    But how many users just want windows. This is not like Linux where if you have used an out of date image you only have to reboot once in the update process.

    How many applications you install under Linux requiring reboot. Exactly zero. Installing video card drivers or kernel updates are about the only time reboot is forced under Linux. Windows still has to come a long way.

    3.5-12 hours even with a machine with a SSD is what you allocate to provide a machine configured for usage.

    Deaf Spy cheapest SSD someone is super game idiot.
    http://www.extremetech.com/computing/173887-ssd-stress-testing-finds-intel-might-be-the-only-reliable-drive-manufacturer

    You must spend decent money on SSD drives or have problems on windows desktop computers. Its not like windows users can use SSD drives the same way as Linux users can.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dm-cache

    Yes Linux users with Dm-cache can use those 50 dollar cheaper second rate SSD drives used as performance boosting caches is quite all right. System will still boot without or without the ssd drive in the dm-cache configuration.

  21. Deaf Spy says:

    Clean install of ANY M$ operating system takes more than an hour!
    Tell me, Dougie, when was the last time you installed a “M$ operating system” and which version it was? And why did you do it? Why didn’t you install Linux?

  22. Deaf Spy says:

    SSDs are still limited. They still are too expensive for the giggles of storage most legacy PCs have.
    Pogson, an SSD is the cheapest upgrade possible for the last few years. You can get a 128GB SSD for $50, which is good enough to store your OS, applications, personal settings and even bits of data.

    If $50 is expensive for you, then you should not upgrade your software to start with. And it also means you extract no value from your computer. None.

  23. Deaf Spy says:

    Sure, nothing that can’t be done using GNU/Linux
    What does Linux has to do with it, Pogson? We speak of PC vs. tablets and smartphones here. The OS on top is irrelevant in this discussion. Please go back to the hardware aspect of productivity.

  24. Deaf Spy, moving goalposts again, wrote, ” On any hardware with an SSD / eMMC”.

    I’m sure it might be faster on a quantum computer with laser storage, but that’s not what’s on most newer legacy PCs. SSDs are still limited. They still are too expensive for the giggles of storage most legacy PCs have.

  25. Deaf Spy wrote, “Basic stuff – write a longer e-mail, or a document, or do some calcs in a spreadsheet?” and ” Gaming on tablets / smartphones is for kiddies, or nothing more than Solitaire.”

    Sure, nothing that can’t be done using GNU/Linux or Android/Linux. The Little Woman wastes hours playing “cookies” or something… Then there are “Angry” Birds. Many millions use these things.

  26. dougman wrote, “Total: +3.5 – 12 hours”

    Don’t forget, M$ has consumers pissing around, “creating accounts” with M$. That probably wastes a half hour or so just reading terms/conditions.

  27. dougman says:

    Clean install of ANY M$ operating system takes more than an hour!

    Lets break it down, shall we?

    1. Installation of kernel image ~30mins at best
    2. Installation of upgrades, patches and multiple reboots ~1-5 hours
    3. Roll-back of upgrades, patches and multiple reboots ~1-3 hours
    4. Reinstallation of upgrades, patches and multiple reboots ~1-3 hours
    5. Verification and activation of user license ~5 mins

    Total: +3.5 – 12 hours

    Anyone that states otherwise is a liar.

  28. oiaohm says:

    Even worse some dell and hp models sold to India and the like are pure Linux only as no Windows drivers to core parts have ever been made.

  29. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy depends on what you are converting. Some HP laptops that come with Linux are also pricks. If you convert them to Windows you will have no wifi or network support built into the device.

    Yes same laptops do come with HP OEM Windows discs that will not Install on the Linux one due to lack of BIOS product key.

    The idea of buy a Linux PC and Convert it to Windows can be a major case of pain. Yes buy a Windows machine and convert it to Linux is possible. The reverse may not be.

    –On any hardware with an SSD / eMMC, clean install takes less than 30 minutes.– As long as you don’t have to custom order installation media. Yes particular HP and Dell laptops are like this. No Windows drivers on the Websites.

    Idea of converting Linux machines is trap central.

    Did you have all drivers installed by 30 mins. I would suspect not.

    Due to Microsoft complaining about Linux machines being converted to pirated Dell/HP and others are have stopping providing Windows drivers for particular models from their web site.

  30. Deaf Spy says:

    Get over the productivity thing. Legacy PCs and consumers were rarely about productivity

    Not quite correct. Don’t you know people who have to do some work at home? Basic stuff – write a longer e-mail, or a document, or do some calcs in a spreadsheet? What about hobbies – music, image editing, video editing? Games – AAA titles on a tablet, please. Gamers who are a market much bigger than cinema, don’t satisfy themselves with consoles very often. Gaming on tablets / smartphones is for kiddies, or nothing more than Solitaire.

  31. Deaf Spy says:

    Ever installed That Other OS? It takes a lot longer than 30 minutes.
    No, it doesn’t. On any hardware with an SSD / eMMC, clean install takes less than 30 minutes. I say this from personal experience – I upgraded and clean-installed about 6 machines already.

    Any other myths and legends?

  32. Deaf Spy wrote, ” Where are the desktops with Linux, that don’t end up with some Windows 30 minutes after being unboxed?”

    Ever installed That Other OS? It takes a lot longer than 30 minutes. Oh sure, it can be done by disc imaging but the typical consumer will not do it that way.

    Here’s a gamer who spent many hours just to get “7” working for him and “10” was no better.

  33. Deaf Spy wrote, “Tablets are on a decline.”

    A 10% decline in unit sales is not a decline of units in use. Tablets last years, just like other PCs. Tablets have made a significant dent in sales of legacy PCs with That Other OS, but not as big as the smartphones. One reason for the decline in unit sales of tablets is that many smartphones are large enough to be used as tablets. There isn’t a need for some people to own both a tablet and a smartphone just as there isn’t a need for some people to own both a smartphone and a legacy PC. The smartphone wins.

    Get over the productivity thing. Legacy PCs and consumers were rarely about productivity: games, browsing, multimedia playing, recipes, … They were largely tools of consumption. I liked them because they rarely forgot stuff. Of course, I had lots of uses for my PCs but I was into science/technology/mathematics/physics/photography ages ago. The typical consumer has a job somewhere and shops somewhere. The rest of their lives are spent in front of the TV/PC/beach/lake/car/lawn/kitchen…, not producing stuff with a PC.

    I was at a party recently, a decent sample of my extended family… Even though I was there, I don’t recall a single conversation about what folks were producing with their legacy PCs. Smartphones were everywhere in every way however. We discussed food, family development, landscaping, navigation, weather, aging, men/women, kids, etc. Several of these folks do produce stuff with PCs at work but not at home.

  34. oiaohm says:

    –Again, we discuss desktop here. Where are the desktops with Linux, that don’t end up with some Windows 30 minutes after being unboxed?–
    Chromebooks of course Deaf Spy due to design installing windows on the is not functional. Converting them to full Linux is possible.

    Something else Apple lost the more market-share compared to Android in tablets.

  35. Deaf Spy says:

    It is nearly entirely Linux based.

    This is weird. Unless you mean Android tablets, there is no way for this statement to be true.

    Again, we discuss desktop here. Where are the desktops with Linux, that don’t end up with some Windows 30 minutes after being unboxed?

    P.S. Tablets are on a decline. Cannibalized by phablets, and by their own low productivity as content-creation devices. Here is your data:
    http://www.androidheadlines.com/2015/07/tablet-market-continues-to-decline-dropping-10-in-q2-2015.html
    http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2954317

  36. dougman says:

    Libreoffice 5 is due out this month and fully compatible with Office.

  37. ram says:

    I’ve pointed it out before, and I’ll point it out again. The consumer electronics merchandise for the “Western” “Christmas buying season” has already been bought and much has already been shipped. It is nearly entirely Linux based. That pretty much spells the death of Microsoft with perhaps the exception of a few corrupt governments.

  38. kurkosdr wrote of reinstallation, “Debian and Ubuntu do not”.

    Reinstallation is routine for TOOS, but rare for GNU/Linux. Beast hasn’t been reinstalled since 64bitness… The first thing I think of when reinstallation happens with GNU/Linux is “why?”. Why would you want to go backwards in time when “current” works well? I didn’t have to reinstall Beast despite changing from smaller to larger hard drives nor replacing a broken motherboard. I just copied files or used the same old hard drives. I’ve never seen malware on Beast either. Of course, I could reinstall if I had a copy of the relevant CDs from Debian or a local snapshot of the repository from those days, but again, “why?”. Reinstallation makes little sense in the world of GNU/Linux. It shouldn’t anywhere in IT where the original condition was more bugs/vulnerabilities and fewer features. In IT, stuff should not quit working. That’s why FLOSS and GNU/Linux is the right way to do IT.

  39. dougman wrote, ” Win-Dohs is not a successful OS anymore it is dying. Sans the PC, M$ is dead and they know it, this is why giving away the OS is a last ditch effort to stay relevant.”

    I don’t think “successful” is the right word to use, even with legacy PCs. M$ is no longer able to force OEMs to ship nothing but TOOS. Ubuntu GNU/Linux and MacOS ship on a significant number of PCs these days and the numbers keep increasing while total units shipped with TOOS decline. That’s not “success” as Bill defined it. He wanted every PC to ship TOOS. According to StatCounter, more than 30 countries used GNU/Linux to browse more than 2% of the time on 2015 July 30, despite decades of TOOS being alone on retail shelves. Usage globally was 1.4%, double what it was in 2010. “7” peaked at 59% years ago. “8.1” peaked at 19%. “10” grew 0.6% per day after release despite a huge installed base able to get a $free “upgrade” in slavery. “7” grew 0.1% per day, needing the sale of a new PC to get going. The OEMs and retailers aren’t going to be such willing slaves now that M$ has cut them out of the gravy train. What will they put on retail shelves now?

  40. dougman says:

    Windows 10 – Clearly the first year of ‘free’ is really beta testing.

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/07/30/win10_real_users_mail/

    M$ is acting out of desperation, as the alternatives are gaining popularity, and fundamentally because they give users choice. M$ never gives it’s users a choice.

    https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2015/07/30/an-open-letter-to-microsofts-ceo-dont-roll-back-the-clock-on-choice-and-control/

  41. oiaohm says:

    http://0pointer.net/blog/projects/stateless.html

    dougman part of systemd is implementing factory style resetting. There is a catch with systemd stateless vs Microsoft refresh. Systemd stateless does not restore applications users intentionally removed.

    –Nope. It’s not the same. Windows has this new feature called “refresh” which restores your installation to factory condition without technically doing a reinstall.–

    Yes it restores all the OEM installed Malware as well. Systemd Stateless you set the point you wish as you stateless point. In fact you can set many stateless points.

    Debian has had the https://wiki.debian.org/Cruft program for a long time.

  42. dougman says:

    KUKU, factory reset is for when you decide to sell or give away your machine. It is not the same, as say, refreshing/reinstalling the operating system as it is dogsh1t.

    Yes, Ubuntu/Debian does not have factory resetting or refreshing/reinstallation features, there is no need for any, the OS just hums along no with no problems.

    Also, Win-Dohs is not a successful OS anymore it is dying. Sans the PC, M$ is dead and they know it, this is why giving away the OS is a last ditch effort to stay relevant.

  43. kurkosdr says:

    Refresh = Reinstall

    Nope. It’s not the same. Windows has this new feature called “refresh” which restores your installation to factory condition without technically doing a reinstall.

    You still have to essentially rebuild the system from scratch, you only save the half hour or so the installation takes, but that way, salesmen can avoid using the naughty word (“reinstall”). It also helps average users to restore their computer to bootable condition without having to call over cousin Jimmy that knows about computers.

    Most sucessfull OSes (Windows, OSX, iOS and Android) have that (that’s why you can factory reset in Android without ROM flashing), Debian and Ubuntu do not

  44. dougman says:

    This is a great read: http://ben-evans.com/benedictevans/2015/7/8/capitulation

    “PCs aren’t going away anytime soon, any more than faxes or mainframes did, but they are the past, not the future.”

  45. dougman says:

    Look at these M$ thieves!

    https://products.office.com/en-us/buy/office

    $500+ for PM software…LOL. Look up the current price on NewEgg.

    I use FOSS software for all my needs:
    https://www.turnkeylinux.org/project-management
    http://www.projectlibre.org/

  46. dougman says:

    M$ wordspeak for today.

    Refresh = Reinstall

    So horrible is the Windows ecosystem, that the entire OS needs to be reinstalled from time to time in order to function.

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