Spikes In Page-views Of XP And GNU/Linux In Finland

I pay a lot of attention to GNU/Linux and have written about spikes in page-views from GNU/Linux desktops in Finland. Today, I noticed that XP also had mysterious spikes. They started 2014-August and stopped a week before spikes began in GNU/Linux last month. See StatCounter

Coincidence? Could be but highly unlikely. Both sets of spikes occurred weekdays. The spikes in XP diminished sharply 2014-December at the same time that GNU/Linux page-views stepped up. The last spike in XP was 2015-April-8 and the first spike in GNU/Linux was 2015-April-9. The spikes in XP grew again and grew stronger. When the spikes in XP stopped, the spikes in GNU/Linux took off dramatically. Finland has the expertise.

So, I’m still leaning to schools. Could some school system have rolled out GNU/Linux in place of XP? That’s what I did. It worked for us. We also ramped up numbers of seats in the process because we could afford the time/money to do that. GNU/Linux is a natural for education. It’s fast, $free, FREE, and flexible. Amen!

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in Linux in Education, Teaching, technology and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Spikes In Page-views Of XP And GNU/Linux In Finland

  1. ram wrote, “In any event, corruption is the scourge of post-colonial outposts.”

    Corruption tends not to be a major issue in Canada. We’re too nice… What we do have is bureaucrats who refuse to do their jobs or do them poorly because of the “rules”. When I was working in education, there were several instances where a change that meant perfect sense locally had to percolate up through seven levels of bureaucracy and back down to another department and back to us, probably two years of memos and meetings, before anything could be done. Often, higher levels made a choice that just didn’t work for us like not including IT in a budget but granting third parties a budget to supply us with stuff that would or would not work for us, e.g. SATA drives for folks with PATA interfaces… or 10/100 switches for folks who wanted to use thin clients… or an Internet connection for hundreds of households and a school which would have been decent for a single household… or not giving teachers a raise for a decade to help balance their budgets. Working around all that bureaucracy is one of the strengths of GNU/Linux and FLOSS. Since there’s little or no expense, the bureaucrats mostly did not care and they got out of our way. Definitely corruption is a problem here but it pales in comparison to the abject failure of government to do the job far too often.

  2. ram says:

    “Chuckle… I guess Australians have “trust issues”… 😉”

    Government officials, particularly federal government officials, here are uniformly corrupt. Think “Nigerians with white skins” and you’ll get the picture. Sad, but true. It must have something to do with past British colonialism. India has similar problems.

    Spanish colonialism seems to have caused “low level corruption”, British colonialism seems to lead to “high level corruption”. In any event, corruption is the scourge of post-colonial outposts.

  3. kurkosdr wrote, “Pog? Are you there?”

    Yes. Been planting trees and commissioning the rototiller, but I’m here. No one seems able to make a decent rototiller any more. I broke the wheel off the monster. Damned strut as found on children’s tricycles… couldn’t handle my weight when the wheel fell in a hole. Never did get it to the garden… {:-(

  4. kurkosdr says:

    Pog? Are you there?

  5. oiaohm says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mir_%28software%29

    kurkosdr something to remember we are Debian users here. Only Distrobution with Mir is Ubuntu. So this mean Redhat and Debian core does not support it. XMir is in fact altered XWayland.

    Also Intel’s Chris Wilson has also posted in Mailing list from Intel Management that Intel is formally not supporting Mir. AMD and Intel have both started formal support for Wayland. Nvidia being Nvidia is really not supporting anyone bar there own secrets. I see Mir going the way YWindows did. You have to remember with upstart Ubuntu resisted systemd for a while before finding it way to hard to keep up resisting its upstream being Debian.

    Next is Gnome and KDE have both announced Wayland support and also bad for Mir have announce they will not be supporting it.

    So Mir is highly isolated if it did not have Ubuntu behind it the thing would be dead now.

    Really you have not read weston have you kurkosdr going off guessing things as normal.

    http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/raring/man1/weston.1.html

    Yes that Mir runs XMir you can run Weston inside XMir so having wayland compatibility right now. The fact wayland allows stacking there is no technical reason why Mir could not be altered to run inside Wayland. With Mir moving to libinput this does get simpler.

    With containers in time wrapping over KMS we should see Mir inside Wayland and Wayland inside Mir. Biggest problem here is Nvidia who still does not have a KMS driver or a driver that can cope with multi different userspaces. Yes open source versions of video card driver/userspace support different version in kernel to userspace and work The new unified driver for AMD closed and open source user-spaces also support multi-able.

    Yes stall again is heel dragging Nvidia.

    But in the real world, lots of apps deal with X, although nobody wants to deal with it. Hint: It’s because they have to. Media players, multimedia apps in general, 3D design/animation apps and 3D games have to.

    Really you are wrong 90+ percent of Linux graphical applications only use toolkits this include games. Yes games use wrappers like SDL instead of using direct X11 commands. Minority of applications talk X11 at all. Blender3d for example directly talks X11 because it has its own internal toolkit called ghost but this items like this are extremely rare. Even so Blender is being updated to support wayland.

    Even video cards support old Windows versions.

    http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/05/gpu-based-rootkit-and-keylogger-offer-superior-stealth-and-computing-power/
    kurkosdr old unmaintained versions of video card drivers don’t count any more and should not have counted either. Yes we are now getting viruses that hide out in GPU units.

    This is Linux people problem we look at drivers from security as well as working point of view. So a lot of what Windows users have called supported Linux people call unsupported and a security nightmare.

    Every Windows 7 (and Vista) app will work in Win10.
    Please not spread bull crap kurkosdr. Majority work in Win10 but a few do break mostly due to Developer stupidity. Yes some Australian government made programs require exact versions of Internet explorer guess how fun that is when you have two require programs that require 2 different versions of Internet explorer from two different departments that you have to deal with.

    Please note Xwayland comes at pain this is why different groups have started working on the likes of EGLX. What is this a wrapper to allow Opengl GLX applications to drop X11 include and use Wayland directly gains a lot of performance back. Running a X11 server inside Wayland as XWayland does is good for compatibility not good for performance so any performance sensitive application will be attempt go go direct.

  6. kurkosdr says:

    Once the decision to go to Wayland is widespread, the porting/changing/reconfiguring will be done for the next releases of several popular distros on which many others are built.

    Why Wayland and not Mir? How many Desktop Linux users are on Ubuntu and how many are in “the rest”? (distrowatch stats don’t count, because they don’t measure installed base) Remember, developers care about audience. This is another major problem: There is no clear “post-X.org” direction. Are the devs of the categories of apps mentioned in the previous post supposed to port to both? (eh?) Anyone who knows how the real world works, the devs will just stay with X.org and piggyback on XMir and XWayland compat, while waiting to see who wins.

    But thing is, nobody is going to really “win”. It will not be like HDDVD vs Bluray, when a winner was chosen in a relatively short period of time and everybody moved there. It will be more like Gnome vs KDE, a protracted schism that will fragment application selection and effort. Eventually someone will hack a way to make things work together (Mir apps on Wayland and vice versa), at great time expense (I like how the desktop linux community always behaves as if they have infinite programmers) and Mir and Wayland will keep being developed independently, draining resources and leading to duplication of effort.

    At least with PulseAudio, there was a clear direction. What else were you going to use? esd?

    Enjoy the successes of 14.04LTS and Jessie while they last. Mir and Wayland are about to bring PulseAudio-style breakages (systemd doesn’t count btw, it’s not touched by many apps), and at the same time bring a schism the community hasn’t seen since Gnome vs KDE.

    A new malaise era for Desktop Linux is coming, fasten your seatbelt. I feel kinda sad, I liked 14.04 LTS.

    Unlike the Wintel treadmill where hardware compatibility was always an issue, that’s long ago ceased to be a significant problem with GNU/Linux.

    What are you talking about? Any kind of hardware doing only -say- Windows 8.1 will be insta-market failure. Even video cards support old Windows versions.

  7. kurkosdr wrote, “It’s those kinds of thoughts that keep me from jumping onto Desktop Linux, instead the most I am going to do with it is keep it as a slave OS in dual-boot”.

    That’s very pessimistic. You may think it’s “conservative” but it’s not. GNU/Linux moves pretty quickly. Once the decision to go to Wayland is widespread, the porting/changing/reconfiguring will be done for the next releases of several popular distros on which many others are built. Meanwhile, you can go on using stuff that works like Debian GNU/Linux for years to come under “long term support”. If Debian can survive systemd, Wayland will be a walk in the park. I was very pessimistic about systemd but it worked out. There are only a very few corner cases with problems yet and they should all be sorted out this year. Nothing drove anyone away from Wheezy. Nothing will drive folks away from Jessie until Wayland or whatever’s next comes along. Unlike the Wintel treadmill where hardware compatibility was always an issue, that’s long ago ceased to be a significant problem with GNU/Linux. That’s the beauty of distros. Someone who enjoys dealing with those issues contributes time/energy/money to the distro and the rest of us get to relax and just use our hardware.

  8. kurkosdr says:

    The only problems I envisage are that older drivers may take some time to transition. Apparently I will still be able to do remote displays, the most important feature of X. Libraries are being translated to Wayland and apps will just work, the way we want.

    To be frank, I don’t trust them to do XMir (and XWayland) right. Remember that PulseAudio shipped with a completely broken ALSA compat layer.

    Basically everyone bets that X.org apps will be rare and few when Mir and Wayland get dropped on the heads of users, just like they expected ALSA apps to be far and few when they dropped PulseAudio on the heads of users. Riiight…

    And yes I know, theoretically you shouldn’t have to deal with X. Theoretically, you just use libraries/toolkits like Gtk or Qt. Just like you shouldn’t have to deal with ALSA, but instead use libraries/toolkits. But in the real world, lots of apps deal with X, although nobody wants to deal with it. Hint: It’s because they have to. Media players, multimedia apps in general, 3D design/animation apps and 3D games have to.

    And yet the community thinks they can either make XMir and XWayland work with all those, or that all those apps will magically be ported to both Mir and Wayland (uh oh).

    It’s those kinds of thoughts that keep me from jumping onto Desktop Linux, instead the most I am going to do with it is keep it as a slave OS in dual-boot, to be used when I just need to quickly boot and torrent something. At least with Windows, apps work. Every Windows 7 (and Vista) app will work in Win10. There was a breakage between XP and Vista, for many right reasons, but that’s it. No breakages because bleeding edge tech is being dropped on people’s heads just when things have started to become stable.

  9. ram wrote, “Everything to communicate through a encrypted proxy outside Australia.”

    Chuckle… I guess Australians have “trust issues”… 😉

    I guess trust is the wrong term. It’s a certainty that many governments are out to get us…

  10. kurkosdr wrote, “everytime Dekstop Linux is about to reach some kind of stability, they plop some bleeding edge tech that ruins everything.”

    I don’t think that’s true at all. Systemd is actually working on Beast as I type and it’s no problem at all thanks to oiaohm’s suggestion. Booting is very crisp now. I have only tried pulseaudio. I use ALSA. No one forced me to use pa.

    Mir/Wayland are not like systemd, an octopus, so a transition should be fairly smooth. The only problems I envisage are that older drivers may take some time to transition. Apparently I will still be able to do remote displays, the most important feature of X. Libraries are being translated to Wayland and apps will just work, the way we want. Distros, of course, will have to tweak settings etc. but that’s upstream of the user so the user should not notice except those who need faster graphics will have it.

    Status a year ago: See Is Wayland the New X?

    Status today:Wayland Test Drive Part 1 – Weston Compositor and RBOS

    It’s definitely usable. Now all that is necessary is to get the applications and libraries applications used ported. That can easily be done this year.

  11. kurkosdr says:

    this graph good news = this is graph good news

  12. kurkosdr says:

    For some reason, my brain automatically matched the red line as “XP” and the blue line as “linux” (probably because if you still use XP, you are in the red in terms of security?), so my initial reaction was “whaa?” Then I read the graph more carefully.

    Anyway, this graph good news for Desktop Linux, too bad it won’t last. Because everytime Dekstop Linux is about to reach some kind of stability, they plop some bleeding edge tech that ruins everything. This time, it’s gonna be Mir or Wayland and full systemd integration, as those two are about to be dropped on the heads of unsupecting users.

    The Dellbuntu audio (pulseaudio) debacle was not an isolated event. It’s a deeply cultural issue. This culture basically dictates that users should be force fed entire bleeding edge technologies (not just some bad patch like MS does), even if it’s known they will cause problems in production systems. Because, according to the culture, you shall rewards upstream for righting Free as In Freedom(tm) software for you, by being their lab-rat.

  13. ram says:

    I don’t know about Finland, but in Australia, heaps of mining companies have discovered that Microsoft anything is a huge breach of security. My company is working 24/7 just to provide price quotes to corporates trying to completely convert to Linux — including their employee’s “personal” and “family use” computers. Everything to communicate through a encrypted proxy outside Australia.

Leave a Reply