April 2015 – Superstars On Each Continent


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I did a survey of the world according to StatCounter, looking for superstars. For North America, I chose Cuba although USA is doing very well. I like underdogs. For South America, I chose Uruguay, which has unleashed a whole generation of users of GNU/Linux. Africa also has Ethiopia where governments and schools have adopted GNU/Linux. For Europe there are many candidates including Spain, France, Germany and Czechoslovakia. I chose Finland because clearly something huge is happening even if it’s only one day a week… India is the GNU/Linux powerhouse of Asia, slowly but steadily increasing share and in use at the office. Oceania is the weakest continent. There are several tiny island nations using a lot of GNU/Linux but New Zealand must blow them away by users/usage. Europe is the hottest continent averaging 2.45% GNU/Linux desktop share of page-views for the month.

The bottom line is that GNU/Linux works for everyone everywhere.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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10 Responses to April 2015 – Superstars On Each Continent

  1. oiaohm says:

    Robert Pogson most ATX cases cannot compact. But as with all rules there are exceptions.
    http://www.aliexpress.com/transparent-atx-case_reviews.html

    There are some Plastic and Metal ATX cases that are flat pack design.
    The ATX box just can’t be shrunk.
    Depends on the case if it a flat pack ATX case it can be compacted the same way tractor was.

    “Power usage and dependability also effect freight. Worst is the dependability the more units you have to ship the get the same result. Power usage the poor it is the larger the generation systems you need to support it.

    So a 1 in 5 failure rate equals have to ship about 6 to get 5. But some of the older systems get to a 1/4 to a 1/3 rate of failure. Please not this is simply old age reducing the computer means to tolerate shipping.

    Something people are not aware of is circuit boards harden with age and get more and more fragile unless you specially treat them.

    Robert Pogson yes you maybe be able to fit more Arm than a x86 in a shipping container at this stage but we cannot be sure that will be the case going forwards. Even so at some point second hand will become pointless.

  2. oiaohm wrote, “Power usage and dependability is a very big problem with very old computers.”

    For freight, weight and size are very big problems. On ships, items are charged both by weight and volume. ATX PCs are just too fluffy to be shipped efficiently as low-end products. My tractor, for instance, was shipped as a pile of parts instead of assembled to save ~$1000 in freight. The ATX box just can’t be shrunk. People paid for its freight once when it cost ~$500. Oil was cheaper then. Now that the box costs ~$0, the freight is the big item.

  3. oiaohm says:

    http://www.element14.com/community/docs/DOC-74513/l/can-the-raspberry-pi-2-replace-your-desktop-computer

    There are still limits to what Arm can handle. But these are reducing. Power usage and dependability is a very big problem with very old computers.

  4. dougman wrote, “Speaking of a superstar…”

    I read that and find it inspiring but now that ARM is fine/fanless/well supported with GNU/Linux, I think everyone would be better off if ARMed units were directed to emerging economies rather than castoff stuff from a previous decade. Freighting is the biggest cost in such operations. The freight on a single ATX box could pay for several ARMed units which can be shipped direct from China by the container-load. We had a similar situation in the Canadian North. The old units, while cheap and plentiful cost as much to ship and power as buying brand new ARMed units. ARM was not that strong a decade ago. Now they have quad-core+, gHz and gB. We know ARM can run from batteries/solar power really well, so the old tech may not be a gift but a burden. Electrical power is rather scarce in the most needy parts of the globe.

  5. dougman says:

    Well M$ sure is not the superstar anymore these days, as Windows 8 market share only grew a few percent since XP was killed off.

    http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2406734/windows-8-sees-market-share-grow-just-25-percent-in-year-since-windows-xps-demise

  6. kurkosdr wrote, “If you have time to do forced upgrades every two years (and tolerate any breakages) just to have the latest version of your apps (because very few apps get packaged for old LTS’s) then you are a first worlder. “

    Uh, I have FireFox 37.0.2 (Jessie has 31.6), and LibreOffice 4.4.2.2 (Jessie has 4.3.3) and I did not have to build from source. No forced upgrades here. No dependency Hell, either. Heck, I have stuff that did not even come in an APT package, swish-0.5.0.

    kurkosdr also wrote, “Uruguay decided to roll out GNU/Linux in school PCs, because quite frankly the productivity needs that need to be carried out are meager.”

    No, they needed IT in education, not no IT in education. GNU/Linux facilitated that in way Wintel would not have. Do the maths. At the time of that roll-out, M$ thought it should be paid ~$150 per licence. OK, they would give schools a discount but they had better use for the money, just as we did in the North. In our case, we had needs greater than Wintel could supply and we got far better IT for the money/time/effort. The number one issue in schools is having seats/PCs. Lower costs means more seats. It’s that simple.

  7. oiaohm says:

    Something else about china kurkosdr is that China has a higher than average unknown value in web stats and that is still growing. If you check out the China government recommended versions of Linux you notice default browser strings don’t include OS information yes that include the customised ubuntu.

    If you have time to do forced upgrades every two years (and tolerate any breakages) just to have the latest version of your apps (because very few apps get packaged for old LTS’s) then you are a first worlder. Consider yourself lucky, I guess.
    China has set 2020 based on a believe that that issue you are referring to kurkosdr will be dead by then. If this is your only anti-Linux card left Kurkosdr your time is very limited.

    Also I use zeroinstall on a lot of old LTS to backport new Ubuntu and Debian on to older versions. So latest version of applications for those who know what they are doing does not require upgrading the complete Linux OS. Main reason for updating fully is end of security patches.

    http://0install.net/pkg2zero.html

    Really its just a longer install process this is why a lot of Debian and Ubuntu package maintainers don’t bother maintaining older.

    Zeroinstall support multi user installs. Yes you have to add a update use script to run on user login that is a pam-script thing and a Zeroinstall feed update.

    Kurkosdr the issue is it does not come out the box configured this way. Reality running newer on older particularly using debian has been possible for such a long time. Zeroinstall feed is just a list of what is required and download and unpack. Zeroinstall just wraps a loader over the debian binaries and everything works for over 99 percent of cases. Kernel dependant stuff of course goes south this is also true under Windows and very rare Debian applications with hard coded paths. Most Linux opengl and x11 stuff is highly tolerant.

    Kylin for china comes with Zeroinstall installed by default. So since you have not been using Linux with Zeroinstall you are not use to how how the China preferred works Kurkosdr. Of course I want to see the wrapper container better integrated than current Zeroinstall.

    Reality the only problem here is lack of neat integration. Gnome project sandbox could give the neat integration.

  8. kurkosdr mentioned, .23% and wrote, “in countries where immediate productivity is needed (China, Malaysia, Mexico), people don’t have time to mess with Desktop Linux (and hence it isn’t even a blip on the radar)”

    You mean like India at 2.1% and China, 0.91%?

    Whether you like it or not, GNU/Linux desktops work for millions of people.

  9. kurkosdr says:

    BTW, where is China? Aren’t they supposed to be “de-Windowsifying” with Kylin?

    http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2378820/china-will-move-to-linux-by-2020-in-de-windowsifying-process

    Oh yeah, there they are at a meager 0.23% (no, really).

    I like it how, in countries where immediate productivity is needed (China, Malaysia, Mexico), people don’t have time to mess with Desktop Linux (and hence it isn’t even a blip on the radar), they just install Windows, which has it’s fair share of problems but less than Desktop Linux. Desktop Linux is a toy for first-worlders to feel good about themselves, much like Organic Food.

    If you have time to do forced upgrades every two years (and tolerate any breakages) just to have the latest version of your apps (because very few apps get packaged for old LTS’s) then you are a first worlder. Consider yourself lucky, I guess.

    But, Uruguay decided to roll out GNU/Linux in school PCs, because quite frankly the productivity needs that need to be carried out are meager. Wow!

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