Uruguay By Quarters – The GNU/Linux Desktop Share

While all over the world we see more or less cautious adoption of GNU/Linux on the desktop,Top 7 Desktop OSs in Uruguay from Q3 2008 to Q2 2015. Uruguay is an outlier. For the last few years, Q4 has been a new high share of page-views according to StatCounter. I see a trend and Q4 for 2015, the year of the GNU/Linux Desktop, should be wonderful, the envy of the world.

Uruguay is one of the countries that has pushed GNU/Linux in education and that effort is paying off. GNU/Linux is growing every year and more rapidly every year in Uruguay. It’s all good, something to emulate if we want the best IT for the lowest cost.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to Uruguay By Quarters – The GNU/Linux Desktop Share

  1. DrLoser posed a losing argument, “the population of Uruguay seems to be deeply unimpressed with the bountiful choice on offer from the Linux Desktop.”

    Yesterday, at work, presumably, GNU/Linux scored 10.51%. Sunday, when many don’t work, GNU/Linux scored 12.41%.

    Surely, that means the people love GNU/Linux more than their employers/government. Good for them!

    Actually, that’s just statistical variance as on other weekends, GNU/Linux may score higher or lower. It’s the mean that counts and GNU/Linux has a higher share there than just about anywhere. It’s not only governmental support but that South American OEMs ship GNU/Linux. The government uses GNU/Linux after making the committment in 2012. They did that after GNU/Linux was already well over 1% and it took some time to complete the rollout. It’s been in schools there for awhile so consumers are not afraid of GNU/Linux. They relish the opportunity to get better price/performance from their IT.

  2. ram says:

    That is an indication the government is becoming less corrupt. Soon behaviours of that kind will attract outside investment. Good on em!

  3. DrLoser says:

    Good for them! Whom do you suppose elected the government that expressed the wish of the people in that way?

    One would imagine that it was the electorate, Robert. Now, back to business.

    The government has mandated the use of FLOSS in all public enterprises, by law. We can agree that this is a fine thing. Said government is elected.

    Rather sadly, though, when given a choice other than a ballot paper, the population of Uruguay seems to be deeply unimpressed with the bountiful choice on offer from the Linux Desktop.

    As you say, Robert: Good for them!

    Chuckle.

  4. DrLoser wrote, “that’s all the explanation you need for the unusually high numbers you are seeing.”

    Good for them! Whom do you suppose elected the government that expressed the wish of the people in that way?

  5. DrLoser says:

    Also, I’ve worked in schools and parents do have input.

    Really, Robert? And which one of these schools was in Uruguay, might I ask?

    You’ve never even visited the country, have you?

    A concludere questo anno [2013] in bellezza è stato l’Uruguay in cui recentemente è stata varata una nuova legge che obbliga l’utilizzo in tutti i pc della pubblica amministrazione i software liberi.

    FOSS is written into law in Uruguay, Robert. Kurks is 100% correct: that’s all the explanation you need for the unusually high numbers you are seeing. When people have a free choice in Uruguay, there is no evidence at all that they choose FOSS in some disproportionate way relative to the rest of the world.

    Isn’t State Compulsion good enough for you? It’s the sort of thing you normally crow about, indeed, demand.

  6. kurkosdr wrote, “a win by political decision.
    To put it in plain words, non-government and non-education computers don’t run Desktop Linux, because their owners have the ability to choose.”

    Ever heard of democracy? You know, a government chosen by the people? They have three competitive political parties. Also, I’ve worked in schools and parents do have input. Many are not shy to get in the face of teachers/administrators if they think anything in the school is not working for them.

    Further, the biggest issue with IT in education is not the particular OS or application but the access. Since schools don’t generate huge revenue and everything is an expense, the cost per seat is key. GNU/Linux wins even if M$ donates software because it runs on cheaper hardware quite well. e.g. Here, in Canada, schools can get 6 year old PCs cast off by businesses for a tax-deduction and avoiding waste disposal charges by donating to CFSL which refurbishes them and donates to schools for $0 or nearly so. M$ can get its OS on those but schools find it much easier/cheaper to maintain GNU/Linux on them than TOOS (no need for AD, Genuine DisAdvantages, server licence fee, CALs, re-re-reboots, malware,…).

    In India, usage of GNU/Linux is higher on workdays. In Bahrain, usage of GNU/Linux is higher on weekends. Live with it.

  7. kurkosdr says:

    What is the ownership of computers in Uruguay? I mean, how many people for every desktop/laptop computer?

    If that number is so low that 10% of computers in Uruguay are education/government computers, we are not talking about a win on merits, but a win by political decision.

    To put it in plain words, non-government and non-education computers don’t run Desktop Linux, because their owners have the ability to choose.

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