$149 For A Real Notebook PC

I’ve invited Walmart to spam my inbox with stuff they’re selling. Usually it’s fairly routine stuff“With an 8.5-hour battery life, the Hisense Chromebook keeps you going all day. The Hisense Chromebook features a textured lid for keeping a sure grip and a metal palm-rest to add structure and comfort while typing. Chromebooks are automatically kept up to date, so you’ll always have the latest virus protection, along with the latest features like Voice Search. Best of all, your Chromebook won’t slow down over time.
See Hisense Chromebook (11.6" Quad-Core Processor).”
but, today, a link brought me to an 11.6″ Chromebook with decent specs for a young/small person who wants mobility and a keyboard and a screen much larger than a smartphone… for $149 USD.

That’s a game-changer, pocket-change, available to anyone on this continent, and it’s not pitifully weak, either. 2.5gHz quad-core ARMed CPU can certainly browse the web, probably as fast as the best smartphone and with all the ease of a notebook. Personally, I don’t like notebooks. Their keyboards crimp my style, but hundreds of millions are OK with that. 2gB RAM is marginal the way browsers work these days, but there are few websites that one could not visit properly with that. You just can’t have 32 huge pages open. Lots of folks have e-mail and FB open all day and not much more. This works for them. For those who need more, this is expandable to 16gB RAM! I’m tempted. I could shove Beast’s storage into a NAS or shift it into the server room and have more space on my desk, a lot more.

Such products can permanently crimp M$’s style, making M$ unable to interest the next generation who could well be the mainstream IT-buyer in a few short years. This is the end of monopoly pricing for IT for consumers. They’ve had it with paying what the market would bear with Wintel. They are used to getting whatever they want with smart thingies. Now, they can get the “new” legacy PC for little more than the price of the hardware, assembly and shipping. It’s a fitting development for 2015, The Year Of The GNU/Linux Desktop. Expect such products to sell out and to be replenished as sales of “legacy” PCs slump. I visited Walmart today and did not notice any interest at all in legacy PCs. $149 will arouse a lot of interest even if it’s only a second, third or fourth PC in a home to avoid having to carry them around to the kitchen, bathroom, workshop, basement, laundry, bedroom, living-room. With such gadgets, an ordinary homeowner can have a PC in every room with less trouble than That Other OS and all its malware, slowing down ( Walmart even pumps that button…). Yes, the retailers are turning to bite the hand that beat them for decades.

I’m not the only one who thinks this development is significant:
See also PCWorld

See also, TechCrunch

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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49 Responses to $149 For A Real Notebook PC

  1. DrLoser says:

    Only a complete idiot who spends his entire life googling for things he has no hope of ever understanding would think otherwise, oiaohm.

  2. DrLoser says:

    Oh yes, and there were plenty of other suppliers selling Chromebooks back in the middle of last year.

    Revenge of the Serendip Yum-Yum Tree?

    I think not, Fifi. Your theory that “there are only so many CPUs to go around” is …

    Utter bollocks.

  3. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser note the processor in the HP on Amazon its not Intel its a ARM that can have produced in more factories. I should have been more exact …

    No, you should have scratched your microscopic brain before posting, Fifi.

    1. Your “evidence” was a puff-piece” from Dell, back in July last year. Want proof that it was a puff-piece? Google for it, and it’s all over the tech press at the time. This suggests that it is a PR effort by Dell and not actual reality. Not that you, Fifi, would recognise reality, so you have a ready-made excuse there.
    2. Your claim related to Dell and HP. The chipset in question was not at issue.
    3. Your claim in re HP is refuted.
    4. Your claim in re Dell is nonsensical. We can proceed on Dell alone, if you wish, but I don’t think you’re going to like it.

    Yet again you prove yourself to be an ignorant buffoon with a tiny yet perfectly formed axe (presumably made of swiss cheese or an equally crumbly substance) to grind, Fifi.

    Your “retractions” are almost as hilarious as your original “propositions.”

  4. Deaf Spy says:

    BitDefender and Avast make boot times slow,/cite>
    Please, Kurks. 8 does come with in-built antivirus software. It is called Windows Defender.

    But hey, if you like to read PC Magazine, feel free to install two or three additional packages. Just in case.

  5. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser note the processor in the HP on Amazon its not Intel its a ARM that can have produced in more factories. I should have been more exact x86 chromebooks from HP/Dell are fairly much education only. Lack of supply has caused Arm chromebooks to appear.

  6. kurkosdr says:

    also had good security = also has good security

  7. kurkosdr says:

    Actually, it doesn’t. I’ve tried it. The only grudge I have with some of these devices is the sub 1366 x 768 resolution.

    I always wondered where Windows fans get those mythical antiviruses that don’t make low-end hardware run like poop.

    BitDefender and Avast make boot times slow, while Eset and Defender make app launches slow (Defender is particularly slow when launching big exe’s). Not to mention that Defender requires the installation of huge “optional” updates (like the Nov 2014 one).

    But see, us mere mortals have to use antivirus that exist in the real world.

    Instead, Android comes with built-in security (validate apps), which, when combined with the rest of the platform (sandboxing, lack of root and no exe/script installers) allows for security without crippling performance. ChromeOS also had good security.

  8. DrLoser says:

    Both HP and Dell are finding themselves screwed. Chrome-books from them are now mostly restricted to education customers.

    As your cite from the Industry Bible, TechTimes, back in July 2014 makes abundantly clear, Fifi.

    Obviously, the Magical Yum-Yum Tree in Serendip is hard-pressed to grow enough CPUs for world consumption. What a rotten shame these things aren’t made in whacking great fabricators with the ability to churn out low-end chips at will!

    Oh, and your “educational” theory, as espoused by this single little puff-piece, can immediately be shot to pieces. Check out the top laptop sellers at Amazon.

    The new HP Snow White comes in at #6 in the Chromebook list. Of course, it’s a bit pricey at $200, which means that Robert will have to add his cod-piece change to his pocket-change in order to buy one, which he was never going to do in the first place, so the cod-piece change is safe. Looks like a pretty good spec for the money, though.

    Why do you even bother with this easily-falsified gibberish, Fifi?

  9. DrLoser says:

    Dr. Idiot, Walmart sells Chromebooks.

    Still having problems with that sub-HSE level of reading comprehension, Doug-nut?

    At no point did I even so much as hint that they did not.

  10. Future says:

    Best Buy and other stores sell them as well (Best Buy has a whole “Google” section with Chromecasts and Android tablets, etc.).

  11. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser not really there is only X number of CPU chips to go round.

    http://techtimes.com/articles/10441/20140714/dell-cant-meet-increasing-chromebook-demand-microsoft-aims-to-offer-alternative.htm

    Both HP and Dell are finding themselves screwed. Chrome-books from them are now mostly restricted to education customers.

    Basically you have had your head in sand as normal. All makers of Chromebooks have been having the same problem. Running out of chips and production speed to make them. Chromebooks are truly selling like hot cakes.

  12. DrLoser says:

    I visited Walmart today and did not notice any interest at all in legacy PCs.

    And presumably you noticed the complete absence of Chromebooks on the shelves too, Robert?

    I mean, you have an eagle eye for the vicissitudes of fickle customer demand. And you have decreed that there is a Global Issue with meeting Chromebook Demand.

    Now, if you happened to see Chromebooks on the shelves at Walmart (God knows, in the relevant isle, you wouldn’t have seen much else but tablets, if M$ stuff was absent), then presumably there are only two reasons for this:

    1. Samsung and other major OEMs for Chromebooks are targeting Manitoba because, as we all know, where Manitoba leads, the World follows or
    2. There isn’t any such bottleneck at all. You’re just fantasising again.

    I can’t really see a third alternative here, Robert. Enlighten me.

  13. DrLoser says:

    On the contrary, ChromeBooks are having trouble meeting demand.

    Oh, really? I didn’t know that you either pay Gartner (etc) thousands of dollars a year to keep track of these things, or otherwise share breakfast every morning at a greasy truck-stop in downtown Manitoba — the International Hub of Logistics — Robert.

    You don’t, do you? And you’re clueless, aren’t you?

    And if OEMs can’t ship enough units to meet demand for a base product that has been out on the market for roughly five years …

    … That would imply that there is something seriously wrong with Chinese Manufacturers.

    Which there isn’t. You’re talking tosh again, aren’t you?

  14. Deaf Spy, confusing market share with rates of shipments, wrote, “For two years, Chromebooks are struggling to break the 2% barrier.”

    On the contrary, ChromeBooks are having trouble meeting demand. 2% in 2 years in USA, for instance, is 4million units. Google and OEMs are laughing all the way to the bank as are consumers, educators, etc.. 2 million of anything is a lot.

  15. Deaf Spy, moving the goal-posts, wrote, ” No, Munich and French Gendarmerie and any state administration institutions do not count. Show me businesses, show me home users.”

    Governments are larger organizations than most businesses. e.g. in Canada we have more than 100K civil servants, more than M$ has employees. They almost all use IT.

    Businesses adopting GNU/Linux desktops include Peugeot, IBM, Google, financial institutions, etc.

    GNU/Linux is an OS. It has a GUI. Anyone can use it. It’s inexpensive too.

  16. oiaohm says:

    http://www.academia.edu/435230/Computer_usage_in_daily_life
    Deaf Spy my 40-60 percent would be well serviced by a chromebooks come from studies like this. Yes this study has 42 percent of their users were so far web dominate its not funny.

    This is why I totally don’t agree that 90 percent of users are like you. Really claiming up to 60 percent you might be able to make story but even then its questionable. IM users these days are normally not locked to Windows.

    Its only the gaming and serous that have Windows ties any more. Not all the gaming and not all the serous are really stuck to Windows.

    Also due to web usage not being demanding web users are likely to run their computers to death.

    Deaf Spy yes my percentages are based on studies in this case. If you disagree I would like to see your study.

  17. Deaf Spy says:

    Huge migrations to GNU/Linux have been made with no such problems except for ~10% of users.
    A reference, please? No, Munich and French Gendarmerie and any state administration institutions do not count. Show me businesses, show me home users.

  18. Deaf Spy says:

    That’s a lot.
    Science does not acknowledge terms like “little”, “many” and “lot”. These are pretty subjective qualifiers that bring no scientific value.

    For two years, Chromebooks are struggling to break the 2% barrier. In other words, they fare even worse than Windows Phone with it’s 4.8% in USA. Which, btw, fares not that bad at Europe with its 10% across biggest markets there. 2% is the share of Windows Vista.

    I fully agree that Chromebooks have their place, and schools are a good candidate. But not for home users. In other words, do not expect the revolution to come from Chromebooks.

  19. Deaf Spy wrote, “forget about warranty”.

    Warranties don’t apply to software usually and the hardware, once working, generally lasts for years. You’re paying too much if you pay extra for a warranty.

    Deaf Spy wrote, of ChromeOS, “No wonder it is still a tiny dot on the radar, years after its release.”

    It’s just a few years and already there are many millions of units installed/shipped. Look at USA:

    How many PCs are in the USA? 200million? How many Chromebooks have shipped to USA? Millions. That’s a lot. Notice the jumps at Christmas. While schools may absorb many, it looks like consumers also take a bunch.

  20. Deaf Spy wrote, “I can’t tolerate the lack of apps on Linux, and lack of some specialized tools I need for my job on Mac. Should be the same for the rest 90% of world’s desktop users.”

    Sigh. In USA/Canada these days, MacOS gets more page-views than “7” or “8.*”. Huge migrations to GNU/Linux have been made with no such problems except for ~10% of users.

  21. Deaf Spy says:

    Wine is a much better implementation of Windows then Windows is in many ways.
    Omg. Do you try to best Oiaohm? It is no easy task, but you are very good!

  22. Future says:

    You can run Windows applications like Photoshop on GNU/Linux anyways. Wine is a much better implementation of Windows then Windows is in many ways.

  23. oiaohm says:

    Deafspy ACPI Sleep no working on Linux is in fact broken firmware.
    http://acpi.sourceforge.net/documentation/sleep.html
    ACPI Sleep as per standard has been support for a long time.

    Good for them. And I can’t tolerate the lack of apps on Linux, and lack of some specialized tools I need for my job on Mac. Should be the same for the rest 90% of world’s desktop users. Any other bright ideas, Fifi?
    Deafspy I also run into the reverse problem using OS X that applications I use are completely missing or broken.

    Desktop studies really have found that 80-90% of users would be serviced by what Linux provides. Heck 40-60 percent would be serviced by a chromebook. So claiming that 90 percent of desktop users are like you is kinda wrong Deafspy.

  24. Future says:

    We can tell that Microsoft’s cronies is getting nervous about the success of Chromebooks. Chromebooks are eating Windows’s lunch on the low end, and Apple is doing it on the high end. It’s the big squeeze!

  25. Deaf Spy says:

    But 3 hours a year is way more than Linux or OS X people want to tolerate.

    Good for them. And I can’t tolerate the lack of apps on Linux, and lack of some specialized tools I need for my job on Mac. Should be the same for the rest 90% of world’s desktop users. Any other bright ideas, Fifi?

    Folks, the boot issue is moot. Not a big thing since ACPI sleep (something that Linux still doesn’t do properly), negligible in the era of SSDs. Get over it.

  26. Deaf Spy says:

    Just install a complete GNU/Linux system on it and you can run all sorts of local processes and file-systems.
    And forget about warranty.

    It’s what a lot of GNU/Linux folks have wanted for ages, a PC on retail shelves without “the tax”.
    Two problems here. How can you be sure that there is no tax? Or perhaps Google tax is fine for GNU/Linux folks? Second, I wonder what ever stopped GNU/Linux folks to purchase parts and build their own PC and still don’t pay whatever tax?

    Really, I don’t get it. Chromebook is an interesting concept, surely has its advantages. But I definitely don’t see it massively at people’s homes. It is simply too limited for that. No wonder it is still a tiny dot on the radar, years after its release.

  27. Deaf Spy wrote, “How does “special-purpose OS” go with “Real Notebook PC”?”

    Well, there’s hardware and there’s software. The hardware’s there to be a real notebook. Just install a complete GNU/Linux system on it and you can run all sorts of local processes and file-systems. It’s what a lot of GNU/Linux folks have wanted for ages, a PC on retail shelves without “the tax”.

  28. oiaohm says:

    Something those TMR guys use todo is claim Linux required more rebooting than it really did.

    http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/jaunty/man1/checkrestart.1.html

    Yes command under Debian based distributions is checkrestart that finds all services that need restarting due to old files. Yes you can restart those services without rebooting.

    http://ingvar.blog.redpill-linpro.com/2012/01/19/finding-what-binaries-to-restart/
    Modern day redhat distributions have equal in yum.

    Only real reason to reboot a Linux machine is kernel update. Add in kernel patching and that is reduced down to 1 times a year on average. 99.999 achieved basically.

    Yes having users log out and back in may be required as well.

    Really could someone tell me a tool for Windows to locate a program using a expired library under windows. That right only way to find out is reboot.

    Really the issue Linux and OS X guys have is how long reboots and how many take. A OS X or ubuntu with 1000+ updates to deploy reboots/boots in the exact same time a OS X or Ubuntu machine with zero updates to deploy. Updating windows sometimes requires multi reboots in a row again this does not happen on OS X or Linux base solutions.

    Linux users hate reboot time so keeping it short keeps Linux users happen. Remember how upset Robert was getting when databases were making his computer take under 10 mins instead of under 2 mins to start up. Then ask a Linux person to wait 40 mins for a computer to reboot or anything else. How to say hanging offence.

  29. oiaohm says:

    http://uptime.is/99.99
    You have to remember even updating a chromebook does better than 99.99 uptime.

    “40 min platform upgrades” is basically your years worth of reboot time eating up in one hit at 99.99.

    The reality here is Windows 8.1 and even the new 10 is still not going to meet 99.99 uptime. Microsoft need todo better. Linux systems(normal, android,chromeos, Firefox os) are able to achieve 99.99 and under careful management 99.999. OS X and OS i achieves better than 99.99 uptime per year.

    5 min of downtime a year due to updating is all we should really have to put up with heck at-least less than 1 hour. Basically when everything else in the market can achieve this and Microsoft cannot they deserve to be hung out to dry for it.

    Like forgetting malware and anti-virus overhead just updating Windows is really not good enough.

    Deaf Spy the reboot issue does not end at XP we wish it did. I will give Microsoft that they have improved from about 6 hours a year lost in reboots to about 3 hours a year lost in reboots from XP to 8.1. I am willing to give credit for improvement. But 3 hours a year is way more than Linux or OS X people want to tolerate.

  30. Deaf Spy says:

    It’s a general-purpose PC with a special-purpose OS
    Now, now, Mr. Pogson. How does “special-purpose OS” go with “Real Notebook PC”?

    The latter, you know, is supposed to be able to run things like, hm, Photoshop.

  31. Deaf Spy says:

    Not to mention Windows will run like crap in that hardware, if we account for the antivirus and bloatware.
    Actually, it doesn’t. I’ve tried it. The only grudge I have with some of these devices is the sub 1366 x 768 resolution.

  32. Deaf Spy says:

    If I wanted to browse the web, maintain this site, generate some graphs, which I do, why wouldn’t I use a Chromebook?
    For a simple reason, Pogson. There might be a moment when you might want to do something different. And then you are busted.

    malware, re-re-reboots
    Please spare your own dignity and stop telling antique Windows XP SP1 era stories.

    My last encounter with malware was exactly then. One owner was spending too much time on dubious web sites, answering YES to all popups, and installing tools to “improve his access” to the site’s galleries. The second was constantly getting USB sticks and CDRs from external parties, and was often victim of autorun malware. Something that ended the moment he got XP2.

  33. kurkosdr wrote, “The two “successes” for Linux are the kind of OSes a true FOSSie wouldn’t touch with a 10-meter pole. An OS that comes with restricted filesystem access from the factory and an OS designed to serve a computing lifestyle which revolves around storing your everything on some remote server some evil company owns.”

    I am a true FLOSSie. I own an Android/Linux smartphone. It’s a fine computer for browsing the web, my Beast’s sites, accessing my databases around home, GPS out in the real world, and I could even call 911 with it in an emergency.I am a true FLOSSie and I would buy a Chromebook if I neededd a client computer. I might install Debian GNU/Linux on it, however, to gain the full benefit of the hardware. I’m full of clients at the moment with about 8 of my thin clients still living. One is in use daily. It would be a toss-up whether to use an 8 year old thin client or a Chromebook as a replacement. The Chromebook would have superior hardware easily, thanks to Moore’s Law, ARM and modern RAM and networking.
    If I wanted to browse the web, maintain this site, generate some graphs, which I do, why wouldn’t I use a Chromebook? It’s a general-purpose PC with a special-purpose OS. I would have to generate my graphs differently, perhaps with an on-line office suite, but other than that, I could live with ChromeOS easily.

  34. kurkosdr says:

    I mean, let’s face it, Robert, you are never in a million years going to buy a Chromebook for yourself, are you?

    This is what I find particularly amusing. The two “successes” for Linux are the kind of OSes a true FOSSie wouldn’t touch with a 10-meter pole. An OS that comes with restricted filesystem access from the factory and an OS designed to serve a computing lifestyle which revolves around storing your everything on some remote server some evil company owns.

  35. DrLoser says:

    I mean, let’s face it, Robert, you are never in a million years going to buy a Chromebook for yourself, are you? Not even for the Little Lady, and even I have recommended that as a fine choice.

    So why do you persist in this fantasy of palming the things off onto everybody else?

  36. DrLoser says:

    From your PCWorld cite, Robert:

    In general, the quad-core Cortex A17 architecture used in the new Hisense Chromebook is somewhat competitive with Intel’s budget Celeron N2840, which powers the vast majority of new Chromebook models. In other tests, though, the extreme budget roots of the Hisense’s RK3288 chip are apparent.

    Well, if all you want is “somewhat competitive,” which is damning with faint praise if ever I heard it, then this shoddy little item is for you! Or rather, not for you, Robert. I notice that it’s yet another in a long line of recommendations for other people that you would never go near, yourself. How comforting.

    Find a little more “pocket change” behind the sofa — you must have awfully capacious pockets, Robert: that’s six imperial pounds of quarters you’re carrying around, there — and you can do better than “somewhat.”

    In fact, for $9 more, you can get “precisely the same.” And they’ll even throw in a proper operating system (Windows 8.1) and all the stuff you get to do when not simply relying on a browser. (You can even swap browsers, which is one of those interesting bits of “freedom” that Chromebooks lack.)

    Just go to Fry’s. Or somewhere else. I didn’t really have to try very hard.

    Earth-shattering this one is not, Robert.

  37. kurkosdr wrote, “if we account for the antivirus and bloatware”.

    Yes, fans of M$ are apt to ignore those two but for most consumers that is the harsh reality of TOOS and why they buy out chromebooks and smart thingies. The market today is moving faster than I ever imagined. I noticed that yesterday StatCounter showed MacOS ahead of “7” in web-stats in Canada. Chuckle… I suspect it’s some change in the “force” of StatCounter’s sample rather than a wave of adoption but of course Wintel’s fans were ignoring that when GNU/Linux was less than ~1%.

  38. kurkosdr says:

    has anyone feels = does anyone feel

  39. kurkosdr says:

    re-re-reboots

    BTW, has anyone feels annoyed by Win8.1’s spinning thingie? The way it varies it’s spinning speed constantly attracts my eyeball, so I can’t play with my phone or watch TV while it’s trying to apply updates during boot (one at a time, because packaging those patch Tuesdays in one big package is apparently too much work for Redmond). I miss the spinning thingie of Windows 7. So relaxing, it doesn’t distract, and if there is no phone or TV around, gives you time to meditate…

  40. kurkosdr says:

    malware,

    Ironically, the only case of successful malware execution I had for the last 8 years was on a GNU/Linux machine.

    The university computers had an old version of Debian with an old version of Firefox, so some site XSSed the browser, stole my Yahoo cookies and spammed my mail contacts (yes, I still use yahoo mail, because I do not want to give my gmail to everyone).

    ChromeOS still needs updates for this kind of attack.

    But I agree with you that while every other OS and apps updates quickly and painlessly, Windows Updates are slow, troublesome (“failure configuring”), annoying and a general pain in the ass (40 min platform upgrades), so anyone already having a PC would be better off with a Chromebook as a secondary PC than the one DeafSpy recommended. Not to mention Windows will run like crap in that hardware, if we account for the antivirus and bloatware.

  41. Deaf Spy wrote, “Why on earth would one buy an ARM notebook, which is capable of web only?”

    Oh, let’s see… A keyboard, a larger screen (11.6/8)^2 = 2.1…, Lose 8.1, M$, malware, slowing down, re-re-reboots…

  42. DrLoser says:

    Funny that you mention Walmart, as Walmart uses Linux internally. I suppose Walmart are a bunch of cheapskates *shrug*.

    I suppose that Doug-nut is unaware of the Walmart corporate philosophy: “First, Be Cheap.”

    *shrug*

  43. dougman says:

    LOL…Deaf Guy is comparing a tablet to a laptop, where there is no comparison! However, since you want to discuss tablets, one can have both for $100 more now.

    http://www.omgchrome.com/asus-chromebook-flip-specs-ips-tablet/

    That Windows tablet thing suffers from lack of applications, so much that M$ is looking at emulation to add Android apps to their platform!

    http://www.slashgear.com/microsoft-rumored-to-eye-android-apps-on-windows-phones-30376007/

    Also, 95% of people just use the web as its stands so a browser is all they need.

    “A Chromebook is Google’s vision of the future. Chrome OS argues that much of the computer experience we take for granted today is outdated, clunky, and unnecessary. Antivirus software, locally installed applications with their own separate updaters, system optimization tools, huge control panels full of settings going back to Windows 3.1, drivers for compatibility with 20 year old printers, the twenty system tray programs running when you boot up your new Windows laptop, a huge user-visible file system that allows you to dig into your C:\Windows\System32 folder — it’s all unnecessary.”

    YEP!

  44. Deaf Spy says:

    Look at this:
    http://www.banggood.com/Vido-W8C-Intel-Z3735F-Quad-Core-1_3GHz-8-Inch-Windows-8_1-Tablet-p-966336.html

    Why on earth would one buy an ARM notebook, which is capable of web only?

  45. dougman says:

    Funny that you mention Walmart, as Walmart uses Linux internally. I suppose Walmart are a bunch of cheapskates *shrug*.

    “While proprietary vendors want us to focus on price, innovators focus on the flexibility and business value of open source…Walmart’s servers built using Hapi were able to handle all mobile Black Friday traffic with about 10 CPU cores and 28Gb RAM”

    http://www.infoworld.com/article/2608897/open-source-software/walmart-s-investment-in-open-source-isn-t-cheap.html

    They even actively hire as well: http://www.simplyhired.com/job/senior-systems-engineer-isd-linux-job/walmart/smv5ruqb5w

  46. kurkosdr wrote, “it’s theoretically possible to set up a LAN-whatever (NAS, Windows/Linux/Mac folder sharing), but it’s not easy to. For a machine that prides itself on being so-very-easy, it’s definately a minus.”

    It’s a bit mind-boggling to be limited to a browser but it’s not all that bad… From what I’ve read, you can easily play music/video from a NAS that provides FTP just by browsing to ftp://something_on_the_LAN/pub/music/Wahoo.mp3. To put stuff on the NAS might be trickier but if the NAS was running Apache as well, just put some kind of CMS on it and tell it what to get from where, like WP can download files from the web, given a URI. I suspect someone sells a NAS that has some kind of web-interface like that, or it’s pretty easy to convert a chromebook or a legacy PC to the purpose. I like ATX cases for that because some can hold 10 drives, perhaps more if they have a USB interface and are the half-size kind. Just load up some standard web-application that allows passing to it a URI and give it access to the router. GNU/Linux could do that in a few minutes. It could just as well be a virtual server somewhere out there on the web although some Internet connections would not be good for that.

  47. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr you just stated the reasons why crouton on a chromebook is so popular.

    https://github.com/yoichiro/chromeos-filesystem-webdav
    Chromebooks work quite well with owncloud after you have webdav installed.

    Your only options are using slow storage to some remote server on the internet.
    No that not the only option people have owncloud working on things like a raspberry pi. Also some nas devices support webdav out box like seagate ones for example.

    So it is fairly much able to be walk into shop by a seagate network connected harddrive + a chromebook take them home configure both and install 1 extension in the chromebook and have local network storage.

    Of course I would prefer to see chromeos come with webdav out box and there are plans to make this so.
    http://hellochromebook.com/2014/09/15/chrome-os-files-app-may-include-dropbox-amazon-s3-and-other-services-soon

    kurkosdr printing is your bigger problem.

  48. kurkosdr says:

    With such gadgets, an ordinary homeowner can have a PC in every room with less trouble than That Other OS and all its malware, slowing down ( Walmart even pumps that button…).

    This is basically the primary market of Chromebooks. Don’t have two Windows PC to pet, have one Windows laptop or desktop and buy a chromebook.

    Not a big market if you ask me, but according to Amazon Top10, it’s one market that exists nevertheless.

    The bad thing with Chromebooks is local storage (for photos and videos, which can get over 100GB in size). Yes, it’s theoretically possible to set up a LAN-whatever (NAS, Windows/Linux/Mac folder sharing), but it’s not easy to. For a machine that prides itself on being so-very-easy, it’s definately a minus. Your only options are using slow storage to some remote server on the internet. Meh.

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