GNU/Linux And The Bottom Line

Saving money by using GNU/Linux for IT is a no-brainer.“Technology and content expense was $54 million and $71 million for the three months ended September 30, 2001 and 2000, respectively, representing 8% and 11% of net sales for the corresponding periods, respectively, and $189 million and $200 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2001 and 2000, respectively, representing 9% and 11% of net sales for the corresponding periods, respectively. The decline in absolute dollars spent during the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2001 in comparison to the corresponding periods in the prior year primarily reflect our migration to a Linux-based technology platform that utilizes a less-costly technology infrastructure, as well as general price reductions for data and telecommunication services due to market overcapacity.” If you pay M$ and “partners” for permission to use the hardware you own, you’re paying too much. Just ask Amazon. They saved $millions in the first year of their switch to GNU/Linux.

I don’t save anywhere near that much but it’s significant: $0 for permission to run my hardware, $0 for re-re-reboots every time M$ fixes something in its inventory of mistakes, $0 for malware, $0 for slowing down, and Debian’s APT (Advanced Packaging Tool) does most of the work of updating my software, OS and applications, with just a few clicks. I’m the MayTag Repairman of IT, thanks to GNU/Linux. It just keeps working and working and I get to blog, garden, cook, weld, hunt, shoot, fish, … you know, do the good things in life.

Since Amazon revitalized itself, in part by dropping that other OS, it’s gone on to be one of the most successful retail, virtualization and cloud infrastructure businesses around, all thanks to GNU/Linux. What really interests me in this is that it’s equally obvious that one can save a bundle by using GNU/Linux on client machines too. IT is IT whether it’s on server or desktop or both. Then there’s mobile and Internet of Things stuff. People save a bundle using GNU/Linux everywhere. You should too. I recommend Debian GNU/Linux because of APT and their huge repository of great software. The world can and does make its own software and shares it with you. There’s no need to include monopolies which overcharge you for everything.

See Form 10-Q For The Period Ended 09/30/2001.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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6 Responses to GNU/Linux And The Bottom Line

  1. DrLoser says:

    Amazon started with Unix, but ended up going to Linux for many obvious reasons that Robert repeats here.

    Indeed, Dougie, but Robert didn’t mention that, did he? The obvious comparison was between a Linux IT base and a Windows IT base, of which comparison there is precisely zero evidence here.

    Nobody disputes that Linux has historically been good at cannibalising other *nixes. (Which is a shame, because I prefer other *nixes.) How will it fare in a long-term fight against Microsoft desktops, for example? Precious little information here.

  2. dougman says:

    Amazon started with Unix, but ended up going to Linux for many obvious reasons that Robert repeats here.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon.com#Amazon_technology

    “The core technology that keeps Amazon running is Linux-based. As of 2005, Amazon had the world’s three largest Linux databases, with capacities of 7.8 TB, 18.5 TB, and 24.7 TB.”

    http://www.redhat.com/whitepapers/services/Amazon_case_study.pdf

  3. oe says:

    Google gave MS the punt some years ago of their desktops like Amazon did; I’d like to think they know a little bit about industrial strength IT…..

  4. DrLoser says:

    Lovely company Amazon is, though. Not at all an “embrace, extend, and extinguish” sort of Good Guy thing. The Gazelle Project was clearly entirely different.

    Or not. Depending upon who you ask.

  5. DrLoser says:

    Oh, and as a rider to that, do you know what the Amazon IT platform was before September 2001?

    Go on, Robert, guess.

    You don’t have a clue, do you?

  6. DrLoser says:

    Amazon? In 2001? Just after the Dot-Com Bust?

    A total outlier, in a year when they were simply trying not to be called in for bankruptcy by the people who owned their debt, and at a particular point in time where … well, you might just notice two tiny yet relevant details out of the following, Robert.

    But just in case, as is your habit, you choose to ignore them, I’m going to highlight them for you.

    The decline in absolute dollars spent during the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2001 in comparison to the corresponding periods in the prior year primarily reflect our migration to a Linux-based technology platform that utilizes a less-costly technology infrastructure, as well as general price reductions for data and telecommunication services due to market overcapacity.”

    Did you notice that very relevant part of the survival process, Robert? Did you? Does the term “dead fibre” mean nothing to you?

    Amazon is a highly successful seller of Linux-based product. This is excellent for their bottom line, but let’s face it, they’re selling it to somebody else. The base cost is not necessarily relevant here.

    Try somebody who actually buys the stuff, Robert.

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