Seeing The Light

“Seeing the light” means obtaining a clear vision of something or getting the big picture. The usage of GNU/Linux is like that. For a long time, web-stats told us GNU/Linux on the desktop was going nowhere really quickly… Today, we can see clearly that’s not the case. Some examples: Norway bounced along at ~1% share of page-views for many years. In 2013 it took off and now seems headed to 4% with growth of 1.35 percentage points per annum.

Then there’s Italy. They were doing well but look at this “hockey stick”.

Others saw the light long ago, Spain, for instance, doggedly increasing share for six years now.

In my own country, Canada, the awakening has been gradual with some bursts of activity over the last two years. Now it’s on fire.

Whatever the time of illumination, the results are clear. GNU/Linux works for people in any country.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to Seeing The Light

  1. Rshack says:

    Sip isn’t being replaced. I work on deploying/optimizing new Volte networks and SIP is a key protocol. Sure, we have border controllers to inter work with legacy technologies, but SIP is the signaling protocol used on the Volte side.

  2. oiaohm says:

    oldfart and drLoser becoming more of a Doofus.

    Number one there are 3 common SSL libraries in opensource. GNUtls, openSSL and Network Security Services (NSS)

    But there are many more include OpenStreamSecII that happens to be in pascal before it got the word open and it was StreamSecII and was maintained by Borland.

    So Having said which, I strongly urge you to re-implement OpenSSL in Pascal.
    Absolutely no need for him to re-implement instead do some maintenance on OpenStreamSecII. Turns out the pascal version has not had half the problems.

    1 problem with Openssl was mono culture nature to security took over. So instead of design your program to use like OpenSSL and GNUtls developers design their programs only to use 1. Result was o my mess with no simple work around.
    2 problem OpenSSL had never been audited properly and everyone was just blindly trusting it. GNUtls had in fact been more Audited than OpenSSL even GNUtls was still a quality nightmare.

    ODF there is still a on going issue with MS Office not keeping up with official versions. This is becoming more of a problem since LibreOffice does connect and upload documents up into Sharepoint.

    SIP is in fact used less and less these days. H.323 has fairly much taking over.
    http://www.en.voipforo.com/H323vsSIP.php

    In fact in most cases there is no need to write your own.

    Something oldfart is not wanting to wake up to. Governments want official standards not defacto standards these days.. Why do Governments want official standards.
    1) Governments require the means to handle 100 year old files. Largest Official secrets act around the world is 99 years. So a file you create today could have to be processable in 99 years.
    2)Governments want to have competitive tender processes. Where many companies can bid for the same supply contract.
    3)Governments due to NSA actions installing back doors in stuff are wanting to see source code of applications more and more and more.

    At some point some countries could outlaw closed source completely.

    In fact China and India are both debate on laws of the type that forbid closed source completely as part of national security.

    oldfart the problem here Robert is closer in alignment with the way the world is going that what you are. PS don’t bother spamming all I will do is post something else after it and completely disregard it again. Reality if all you can do is attack robert for being a person who will not waste funds the more of the joke you are. Don’t you want more money for Hospitals or Schools. IT budgets running cheaper achieve that.

  3. oldfart says:

    “All of these are complicated by their very nature. No conspiracy required. No criminality in sight.”

    But don’t you understand DOctor, when you are a cheapskate who feels entitled to having his ideas of Information Technology be those of the world, and who has a vested interest in continuing to bask in the glow of his freebie. These protocols HAVE to be an ebil conspiracy!!

  4. DrLoser says:

    M$ still has lots of anti-competitive measures active like increasing the complexity of their protocols/file-formats so that others who wish to interoperate are always at the starting line.

    Have you tried implementing ODF recently, Robert? Have you tried implementing SIP?

    Have you even tried implementing the OpenSSL protocols?

    All of these are complicated by their very nature. No conspiracy required. No criminality in sight.

    Having said which, I strongly urge you to re-implement OpenSSL in Pascal. Judging by the last year or two, you couldn’t possibly do any more damage.

    This is one starting line that belongs to your own peculiar genius, Robert.

  5. LinuxGentlesir says:

    Microsoft will fight till the bitter end, using all legal and illegal methods in their disposal. But they will ultimately lose. For they fight with the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress.

  6. LinuxGentlesir wrote, “It is surely true that GNU/Linux will be the operating system of choice for desktops in the future, as it already is for virtually all other forms of computing.”

    That makes a lot of sense in a free market but M$ destroyed the free market long ago and it’s just now reviving. GNU/Linux has been technically superior for as long as I’ve been using it but M$ had more “partners” in crime killing competition. Now that they were forced to behave more reasonably, GNU/Linux has a shot. M$ still has lots of anti-competitive measures active like increasing the complexity of their protocols/file-formats so that others who wish to interoperate are always at the starting line. Fortunately, that trick is getting old and ODF etc. are catching hold. It’s still an uphill battle.

  7. LinuxGentlesir says:

    It is surely true that GNU/Linux will be the operating system of choice for desktops in the future, as it already is for virtually all other forms of computing.

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