Milestone: India Reaches 2% Share Of GNU/Linux Page-views

2015 has been a great year for GNU/Linux on the desktop in India. From around 1.85%, the share of page-views of GNU/Linux has rapidly grown to 2%. It was only that high on one day back in 2012 before this. This is on weekdays, folks. Indians are using GNU/Linux desktops in school and at work. It pays to have salesmen. Thank you, Dell, Canonical, and all the government’s IT folks. I love you. 😎 Let’s hope this trend holds up for a few months more…

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About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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5 Responses to Milestone: India Reaches 2% Share Of GNU/Linux Page-views

  1. luvr says:

    “Nope. I mean 2015.”

    Oh, OK. Guess I misinterpreted the phrase that “2015 has been a great year.” Must learn to read that as if it has a “so far” qualifier added. It’s one of the peculiarities of the English language that keeps getting me confused.

  2. oldfart wrote, “this miniscule change depends on government bypassing the marketplace and forcing linux desktop use by fiat.”

    Make up your mind, oldfart. Either government is choosing to use GNU/Linux or it’s not. Governments are some of the largest organizations on the planet. Don’t their choices matter? Many employers and large organizations do force standard platforms for efficiency. If an organization is going to do that, it makes sense that GNU/Linux be the standard: low price, open standards, supplier independence, FLOSS, hiring local talent instead of supporting the life-styles of $billionaires in USA, etc. None of these things may matter to oldfart, but they are important and many governments consider them in choosing their IT. I wish Canada did more of that…

    One thing is different about governments compared to other smaller organizations, they can and do make their own software. That’s easier with FLOSS, of course, because of the licences, but it also ensures government of the security and efficiency of the software. Any particular lock-in to some M$-only software can easily be overcome by a government with 100K+ seats by adopting FLOSS and modifying it to suit. Governments can also easily share the cost of development with other organizations, because they are not in the business of making software normally. That’s why many governments contribute to LibreOffice, for instance. It is a good way a large organization can supply IT without bearing the full cost of development. If my government contributed $1million per annum to LibreOffice, they could either make a donation or hire a few good programmers. Either way they would get an office suite for a few dollars per annum that worked for them and not for M$.

  3. luvr wrote, “Don’t you mean 2014? Or do you have a cystal ball, after all?”

    Nope. I mean 2015. In January, 2015, GNU/Linux page-views in India rose about half as much as in all of 2014. 2014 wasn’t bad but 2015 is looking very good. In 2014, GNU/Linux rose from about 1.5 peak each week to about 1.85%, .35% for the entire year. In January, GNU/Linux rose from about 1.85% to 2%, .15% for the month. It was rather flat for the second half last year.

    I don’t see any reason this growth can’t continue with Indians loving small cheap computers running GNU/Linux, OEMs making them and retailers selling them.

  4. oldfart says:

    Foolishness. 2% from 1% bay be 100% growth, but it is is nothing in the bigger scheme of things. And even this miniscule change depends on government bypassing the marketplace and forcing linux desktop use by fiat.

  5. luvr says:

    “2015 has been a great year for GNU/Linux on the desktop in India.”

    Don’t you mean 2014? Or do you have a cystal ball, after all? 🙂

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