Applications? Yes, The Applications Set Android/Linux On Fire

“There have been more than one million free and chargeable applications at Google Play, with two billion downloads a day on average from about 190 countries. Google paid a total of US$5 billion to developers of Google Play applications during June 2013-June 2014.”Remember when folks were telling us that GNU/Linux wouldn’t fly because it lacked applications? Consider Android/Linux. It had zero applications a while back but now it’s on fire. 2 billion applications downloaded a day. Amazing.

GNU/Linux has fewer applications but it’s still growing. Even when “share of page-views” was stuck at <1% (according to StatCounter) for several years, GNU/Linux was growing because the number of PCs was growing. Now that shipments of legacy PCs have stopped growing GNU/Linux PC-shipments continue to grow and faster than ever…

It’s just a guess what the cause is, but I expect it’s some combination of disgust with M$ and M$’s products and the ability of consumers to buy small cheap computers running GNU/Linux. It’s all good.

See Taiwan amid top-5 Google Play markets globally, says Google Play executive.

See Global PC shipments from 1st quarter 2009 to 4th quarter 2014 (in million units)

See StatCounter

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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15 Responses to Applications? Yes, The Applications Set Android/Linux On Fire

  1. oldfart says:

    “Android is Open Source. Get the sources here:”

    The pieces that count are not.

    As far as what microsoft says is concerned, I could care less. I don’t need their input to make my own assessment.

  2. oldfart says:

    “Android/Linux is a FLOSS operating system widely accepted by OEMs, retailers and consumers.”

    There you go again. The reality of Android. is that it is a commercially oriented OS with an effectively closed environment build on top of carefully selected FOSS. the safety of implementing ones work on top os Andriod has proven a major boon for the same commercial ISV’s who have now take their code written for the iOS and port it over to Android – thus expanding their market. There is a lot of freeware in the Google store, but very little of it is source code available.

    THen again I should think you would still be happy whether it is FOSS or not – you can get along quite well on the free versions of much of what is available.

  3. oldfart wrote, “What does that have to do with Android. Its a commercial OS with Business looking to sell their wares.”

    Everything. Android/Linux is a FLOSS operating system widely accepted by OEMs, retailers and consumers. Samsung, for one, has hired thousands of developers to work on Android/Linux for all their gadgets. Retailers probably don’t have any difficulty finding staff familiar with Android/Linux but I’m sure Samsung has trained a few in-house.

    Just a note. I installed gNewSense in a virtual machine and this comment comes from that. Systemd wrecked my configuration of virt-manager, but kvm works fine from the BASH prompt. The thing booted like a bat out of Hell but it’s only Debian 6.0… gNewSense could be a reasonable alternative to Debian should the systemd mess fester but it’s too dependent on Debian and has really few/slow mirrors.

  4. oldfart says:

    “That’s the beauty of FLOSS.”

    What does that have to do with Android. Its a commercial OS with Business looking to sell their wares.

  5. ram wrote, “The number of Linux developers will only increase by leaps and bounds as more and more people take up programming in Brazil, Russia, China, India, and other highly populated countries. “

    Oh, yes. Training people in GNU/Linux and Android/Linux is a growth industry. Schools and businesses all over the planet are getting into that. Some businesses that want to migrate to GNU/Linux find it difficult to hire talent so they train their own people. That’s the beauty of FLOSS. Any organization is unfettered by M$’s EULA and can use/modify/distribute the software any way that works for them. I think every government has a duty to make sure FLOSS gets into schools so that every country/region will have the talent needed. This boosts the local economy instead of throwing money at M$.

  6. ram says:

    Android/Linux has heaps of applications because it is easy to port from GNU/Linux to Android/Linux. Further, the development tools to do so are all freely available on GNU/Linux. It is not just the vast numbers of applications available for the Linux platform, it is also the vast number of developers.

    The number of Linux developers will only increase by leaps and bounds as more and more people take up programming in Brazil, Russia, China, India, and other highly populated countries. With Linux compatible computers being cheap and the development tools nearly all free, the mass of developers is unstoppable.

  7. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser what country. France and China you see Linux PC on shelves. Interesting point France governement is ODF and China is UOF.

    The reality here is Microsoft has lost the standard war in both of those countries.

    Yes it about the applications. Problem is Microsoft is losing there major keystone MS Office in different markets.

  8. DrLoser says:

    Consumers don’t see the price of M$’s OS so they don’t feel cheap buying GNU/Linux. All they see is another PC at a lower price.

    And we’re back to the argument that everybody else (though not you, Robert, we have agreed on this) is a cheapskate.

    It hasn’t worked in twenty years, possibly because there were no OEM Linux boxes on the shelves. But now that there are OEM Linux boxes on the shelves, and now that Windows 10 is free to consumers (cheapskate or otherwise) …

    … Isn’t it time to give up on this tired failed old argument, and concentrate on the superior technical merits of the Linux desktop?

    Whatever those might be.

  9. oldfart wrote, “Nope, the consumers who actually still need desktop pc’s have their solutions, including FOSS on windows and windows share/freeware to choose from. No need to cheap out on a hobbyist OS.”

    Consumers don’t see the price of M$’s OS so they don’t feel cheap buying GNU/Linux. All they see is another PC at a lower price. If an OEM installs it, there’s no hobbyist OS…

  10. matchrocket wrote, ” The way it’s looking now is that most will stay with Windows 7 until its end-of-life.”

    That’s probably true but many consumers are still thinking their only choice is 8.* on retail shelves. They are about half the unit sales. So, even another disastrous rollout only cuts M$’s revenue by some fraction. That’s the vestiges of monopolistic leverage. It’s all coming to an end real soon. It’s definitely happening in India where the government has its own GNU/Linux distro, LibreOffice is being promoted and Dell and others are selling boatloads of GNU/Linux legacy PCs. More people use GNU/Linux there on weekdays than weekends. Giving licences away may slow that movement down but it won’t stop it. GNU/Linux works for people.

  11. matchrocket says:

    All that cash can hide a world of ills. And giving away Widows 10 will not help. Businesses will not get sucked in. The cost structure is highly convoluted. Plus Microsoft has not nailed down how much the recurring cost will be for servicing the OS. There are too many questions to be answered at this time and Microsoft will have to answer them soon. The enterprise will need to know what the costs are ahead of time to make plans to include Windows 10 in their future. The way it’s looking now is that most will stay with Windows 7 until its end-of-life.

  12. oldfart says:

    “I think client uptake of GNU/Linux is still rather slow just because consumers and retailers are rather ignorant of it. That’s improving with time.”

    Nope, the consumers who actually still need desktop pc’s have their solutions, including FOSS on windows and windows share/freeware to choose from. No need to cheap out on a hobbyist OS.

  13. matchrocket wrote, “Microsoft can no longer count on that loyalty”.

    Still, they’re making a ton of money on the office suite and servers. It doesn’t look like M$ will crash and burn, as they deserve with their history of flying drunk while smoking dope, but rather they seem to be sinking into a lower level somewhere. The fact that they are willing to give away the client OS so as to remain relevant shows it’s now becoming a placeholder rather than an anchor. I think client uptake of GNU/Linux is still rather slow just because consumers and retailers are rather ignorant of it. That’s improving with time.

  14. matchrocket says:

    Widows is a broken OS. No amount of patching will fix it. In fact, yes fact, patching it can cause it to break more. Windows 10 will be just as bad as its predecessors if not more so.

    Users and the enterprise have been willing to accept the cost of Windows maintenance as part of doing business with Microsoft. But the numbers show that Microsoft can no longer count on that loyalty. People do have a breaking point. Microsoft is finding it.

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