OMG! GNU/Linux @ Walmart.com, sort of…

Remember the netbooks with GNU/Linux at Walmart, years ago? They are back, in a way…“The Acer TravelMate Series of notebooks features dependable processing power, wide-ranging communication capabilities, and indispensible security solutions to empower mobile professionals like” Walmart.com lists a bunch of GNU/Linux solutions sold by other organizations when you search for “Linux” on their site… That’s kind of strange. It’s almost as if M$ had paid them not to sell GNU/Linux but that it’s OK to tell others are selling it… I’ll bet M$ is not too pleased. It’s all good.

Let’s see what’s served up:

Are we there yet? Is this the year of GNU/Linux on the desktop when the biggest retailer in the world sells GNU/Linux PCs from a variety of OEMs direct to consumers, albeit sold and shipped by lesser and more flexible organizations? Maybe this is the decade… At the very least it means Walmart is aware there are customers who want GNU/Linux. That is a big step in the right direction. Walmart in Brazil has long been going with GNU/Linux. Expect Walmart to move to openly selling GNU/Linux soon unless M$ is paying them more than they could earn doing that. I don’t think Nadella buys into that kind of thing the way he recently spoke of GNU/Linux. M$ would be happy just to sell cloud services to a user of GNU/Linux. It’s all good.

See Query for “linux” at Walmart.com.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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18 Responses to OMG! GNU/Linux @ Walmart.com, sort of…

  1. oiaohm says:

    So you wish to be called DrZealot from now on that is fine. Only a Zealot goes out of there way to change someone else name to attempt to be funny or insulting.

    2) Why is Walmart doing this, in this particular market? It makes no sense, in Walmart terms.
    Its you DrZealot who asked this question. Robert never asked this question. Robert did not see anything strange about it.

    Understanding what the device is happens to be important.

    a Wyse thin client with Suse GNU/Linux
    By this quote Robert was in fact smart enough to know what it was.

    DrZealot the problem we have is computer terms are used in brand names that basically only very small section of truth any more.

    I like dealing with Zealots when they make a mistake they attempt to always say its not my fault.

    You asked me why I had no curiosity at all about it. Exactly what is curiosity about a netbook having a wacky name. That is right its only a curiosity to those of us like DrZealot who did not understand what it was.

    “a Wyse thin client” can technically be correct as a product name DrZealot.

    This is a Zealot problem attempting to nit pick way out of error.

    DrZealot your name is now stuck as this until you now formally apologizes.

  2. DrLoser says:

    Er, except that it’s a link to Walmart online. I’m confused. Not that it matters, but which one is it, Robert?

  3. DrLoser says:

    (Having done which — scrolling up — however, I note that I got the retailer wrong: it’s actually Circuit City, which as Wolfgang points out is now merely a brand label for Tiger Direct. My apologies to Walmart on this one. They wouldn’t be seen dead selling this overpriced crap.

    Perhaps this sort of virtual shelf-stocking is a large part of the reason for why Circuit City went out of business in the first place?)

  4. DrLoser says:

    If you’ll scroll up a little to the cite in the OP, Fifi, I think you’ll find that the “normal moron” (as you call him) in question here is Robert, not me. It’s a cite that even has “thin client” in the title.

    You’re not really very good at this “insult” thing, are you?

  5. wolfgang says:

    …What will the bricks-and-mortar types do?…

    same as circuit city. go out of business.

  6. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser 700 Dollars is not the Dell price..

    Wyse X50m Thin Client is this:
    http://www.dell.com/au/business/p/wyse-x-class/pd

    Explain exactly why does a normal thin client device have a 3G/4G modem(this is not a item you find in a thin-client only in a thick-client). Surprise Surprise the Wyse X50m will run standalone without a thin-client network.

    DrLoser is still his normal moron on the topic. The Wyse X50m Thin-client is the old Dell netbook. Walmart has always stocked the netbooks so of course they would stock the Wyse X50m Thin-client.

    The acer linux Linpus stuff are also all Acer old Netbook stuff.

    For example 7450-Z50Q a dell Linux thin-client by Dell description. Exactly how is a system with 8GB of ram and 64GB of flash a thin-client. Yes its a fairly fat client running applications locally.
    DrLoser you should have read this more carefully.

    The things Dell calls thin-clients running Linux/Windows include what other companies would call netbooks or compact PCs.

    Yes there is a reason why thin-clients are growing items not thin-clients being called thin-clients.

    http://www.dell.com/learn/au/en/aubsd1/campaigns/wyse-linux-thin-clients
    Dell Wyse-enhanced Linux thin clients offer high performance, security, the ease of management and use of virtual desktops, plus the flexibility to browse the web or run local applications within a Linux environment. Choose a Wyse-enhanced Linuxâ„¢ thin client for:
    Note run local applications.

    These dell Wyse Linux thin-clients don’t meet the formal description of a thin-client. They are Linux PC or Linux Thick Clients DrZealot.

    Even the Dell Wyse Windows Thin-clients are fairly much legacy free PC systems. Yes you can run Windows applications on them its just a question if you will have enough flash installed.

    Only Dell Wyse thin-clients that meet the formal description of a thin client is the Thin OS ones.
    http://www.techterms.com/definition/thinclient
    Thin-clients no harddrive no running applications locally.

    Yes these dell Wyse Linux/Windows thin-clients have a solid state harddrive and run applications locally. So are thick-clients by formal define not Thin-clients. OS image can be central managed in fact must be for the Windows versions yet is optional for the Linux versions.

    Another sign of a thick client is “functional whether they are connected to a network or not.” A 3G/4G modem that is a intermittent connection is worthless to a true thin client due to a true thin client failing when it loses network connection.

    Yes Dell so call thin-clients that are Linux based can be fully functional without a network connection.

    Maybe the reason DrLoser you have not been able to see Linux PC sales is that you have been looking in completely the wrong place.

    So the reason why Wyse X50m Thin Client is so over priced for a thin-client is because in reality its not a Thin-client. Wyse X50m Thin Client is really a netbook that can do a thin-client role. The 32GB flash version of the Wyse x50m is quite decent.

  7. DrLoser says:

    What will the bricks-and-mortar types do? Drop out or include GNU/Linux on their shelves at last?

    Well, you could start with Walmart as a primary study on that one, Robert.

    Last time I bothered to look, Walmart is pretty much a bricks-and-mortar operation.

  8. DrLoser says:

    One could get (2) Chromebooks for that price and do the same thing.

    We are as one here, Dougie. Try explaining that to the aboriginal font of all that is wise and available on Google.

  9. DrLoser says:

    And finally we get a (completely pointless) googled link from oiaohm.

    Why do you bother doing this, oiaohm? It’s futility to the nth degree.

    Wyse is nothing more than Dell thin-client brand. Cheapest way to buy wyse is straight from dell also then you get customization.

    And it still costs $700 for a thin client. And it’s still being sold by Walmart.

    Why do you persist in wandering off into completely irrelevant tangents, oiahom? There are only two questions to answer here, which are the questions I posed in the first place.

    1) Why is Robert so excited by the concept. (Easy. Answer: because Walmart are purportedly “selling” Linux.)
    2) Why is Walmart doing this, in this particular market? It makes no sense, in Walmart terms.

    Have you no curiosity at all, little feller?

  10. oiaohm says:

    I mean, Walmart aren’t noted for price/value. They’re well-known to be a company that drives down the wholesale/manufacturing price as far as possible, in order to offer a low ticket to the consumer.
    Sometimes you have to wonder what DrZealot has been drinking.

    http://www.dell.com/au/business/p/wyse-x-class/pd
    Wyse is nothing more than Dell thin-client brand. Cheapest way to buy wyse is straight from dell also then you get customization.

    Dell some times drives you completely nuts. Like the Linux version X50M does have USB 3.0 ports but they don’t work due to a OS issue and the Windows version X90M7 does not have mobile phone network or web cam and those are not optional extras either. Basically you cannot buy one that is hardware feature complete and working out box. The Linux hardware is in fact feature complete other than have to replace OS.

    32GB flash and 4GB in ram is big enough for quite a few Linux distributions.

    Walmart attempts to be a store that attempt to make customers think they can buy everything they want from one location.

    Wyse 7000 series mobile thin clients is basically dells old netbook line. Yes DrZealot and others went around claiming that netbooks died out. Reality they did not netbooks became listed as thin-clients.

    http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/wyse-t-class/pd

    Dell Thin OS is in fact Dells highly customized pain in but thin-client OS. Most Dell thinclients today come with a Linux option but they can be a complete pain in but to find as what OS a thin-client from dell comes with is based on model number. Only ones that is not is “Dell 5000 all in one” that is a Dell Thin OS and the 1000 series that are multi seat only yes total of 2.

    Windows embedded is 100 dollars more per unit than Linux or Thin OS versions form Dell for the same hardware.

    Something to remember is 10 years ago it was very much selected models only with Linux option.

    Something also to beaware of I am not exactly sure if you calling some of the dell items thin-clients is correct description.

    For example 7450-Z50Q a dell Linux thin-client by Dell description. Exactly how is a system with 8GB of ram and 64GB of flash a thin-client. Yes its a fairly fat client running applications locally.

  11. dougman says:

    $800 of a thin-client? LOlzz….

    One could get (2) Chromebooks for that price and do the same thing.

    On one job, corporate offered me an Ultrabook, I said keep it and used RDP access. When asked how I would do my job, I showed them. Then they ended up buying Chromebooks at a 4:1 purchase ratio.

  12. wolfgang wrote, “Walmart is just selling their ordering and distribution services to anyone who wants to pay them for the opportunity. Amazon is doing the same thing.”

    If that’s the case the PC-market has become more competitive than ever and consumers at last are going to have choice. What will the bricks-and-mortar types do? Drop out or include GNU/Linux on their shelves at last?

  13. wolfgang says:

    …I’m not even sure why they’re trying to sell to a specialist market like Wyse…

    Walmart is just selling their ordering and distribution services to anyone who wants to pay them for the opportunity. Amazon is doing the same thing.

  14. wolfgang says:

    …Circuit City…

    “Circuit City Stores, Inc. (former NYSE ticker symbol CC) was an American multinational consumer electronics corporation. It was founded in 1949 and pioneered the electronics superstore format in the 1970s.[1] Circuit City liquidated its final American retail store in 2009, following a bankruptcy filing and subsequent failure to find a buyer.

    At the time of liquidation, Circuit City was the second largest U.S. electronics retailer, after Best Buy. There were 567 Circuit City Superstores nationwide, ranging in size from 15,000 to 45,000 square feet (1,400 to 4,200 m2), when the company announced total liquidation.

    The “Circuit City” brand was then bought by Systemax, Inc., which used the brand to sell electronics and media as an online retailer, CircuitCity.com, until late December 2012, when the website was merged with TigerDirect.

  15. DrLoser says:

    Those prices are pretty high considering how low wholesale prices on computer hardware are these days.

    I think this comment essentially amplifies my point, but it does leave another question dangling.

    I mean, Walmart aren’t noted for price/value. They’re well-known to be a company that drives down the wholesale/manufacturing price as far as possible, in order to offer a low ticket to the consumer.

    I’m not even sure why they’re trying to sell to a specialist market like Wyse thin clients, for example. Whatever this means, it doesn’t necessarily have much to do with Linux … although it’s definitely interesting.

  16. ram says:

    Those prices are pretty high considering how low wholesale prices on computer hardware are these days.

  17. DrLoser says:

    Are we there yet? Is this the year of GNU/Linux on the desktop when the biggest retailer in the world sells GNU/Linux PCs from a variety of OEMs direct to consumers…

    The simple answer is, no.

    A more interesting answer is, what happened to the theme of that post not but two lower down, Robert? You know:

    Come On! The Year Of GNU/Linux On The Desktop Was Ages Ago. Now We’re Mopping Up.

    In which, as I recall, you proposed that the complete inability of Linux to conquer the desktop was an irrelevance.

    Do you have a measure of success here? Because, from the outside, you appear to be giddily all over the place.

  18. DrLoser says:

    The ZBook-17 starts at $1699, from source, Robert. I don’t know how much more oomph you get at $2620.99, but somehow I don’t believe that just because it comes with Linux preinstalled, some maniac is going to pay slightly short of $1000 for the privilege.

    And if for some reason I was given one of these things, I would happily pay $50 to get Windows on it. The Evil Tax at this point rounds out to 2%. Not really that evil after all.

    As for a Wyse thin client at $700 … I’m getting blisters on my brain. What sort of sense does this make?

    Perhaps I should extend my question as to “What is Debian Worth” to “What is a Thin Client Worth?”

    Would you seriously recommend a $700 thin client to anybody?

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