Has The Russian Government Moved To GNU/Linux As Planned?

According to StatCounter, there has been a slow but steady shift to GNU/Linux in Russia, with a daily heartbeat. Is this usage in schools and governmental offices as planned? It could be but I would have expected a more dramatic shift than we’ve seen in countries with a more gradual approach to migration. Instead we sell a much less dramatic shift but still with a heartbeat (higher usage weekdays than on weekends) indicating work/school usage.

There is another plan which almost certainly will involve replacing Wintel PCs with GNU/Linux PCs gradually, by a million units per annum, the move to Baikal processors, a derivative of ARM. Recently, in response to sanctions over Ukraine, Russia will officially prefer home-grown “solutions” for IT. There are signs of a digital “cold” war emerging and the world’s IT is dependent on several components originating in Russia. Such pressures will surely accelerate migration to GNU/Linux in Russia. It’s a short cut to independence.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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15 Responses to Has The Russian Government Moved To GNU/Linux As Planned?

  1. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser the Russia Mil certifies what software Russia Government can use.

    By the way vendor making Baikal processors is the same vendor that was making processors for Russia during the cold war. Windows does not support Baikal processors.

    DrLoser I see you love deformation. How many criminal things are you going to commit. Modify someones name to represent them in a bad way is deformation.

    This is the problem most MS Troll really land on the go straight to jail if caught a lot.

  2. DrLoser says:

    Russia has some very good mathematicians and computer scientists. What they come up with may, or may not be Linux, but when they throw resources at something they almost always get results.

    Indeed so. Staliinist genetics, for example.

  3. DrLoser says:

    Russia mil has always loved independence in software to everyone else.

    I don’t wish to be unkind, Fifi, but that isn’t quite the “independence” I was asking about.

    I neither know nor care whether the y-axis is independent of the x-axis … wait, actually I do, let’s try again.

    I am not especially interested in the independent supply-line of any military organization you care to mention, Fifi.

    And, on the other hand, I have to admit that the Russian Federation is an independent state.

    Tiny little problem: it’s an independent state that keeps on interfering in its neighbours’ independence, on the basis of a spurious historical justification.

    Whether or not it uses Linux or LibreOffice or Duck-Duck-Go is, perhaps, an interesting sideline. But hardly very important, as far as I can see.

  4. oiaohm says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PTS-DOS

    Russia mil has always loved independence in software to everyone else. Yes Russia has a long history of making there own CPU and OS. Its kinda been a abnormally that Microsoft has been able to sell any product to Russian Government.

  5. ram says:

    Russia has some very good mathematicians and computer scientists. What they come up with may, or may not be Linux, but when they throw resources at something they almost always get results.

  6. DrLoser says:

    It’s a short cut to independence.

    In Russia, Robert?

    “Independence” from what daily concern would this absurd suggestion achieve?

  7. DrLoser says:

    There were exactly two reasons I moved away from that other OS:
    1.It wouldn’t work for me and my students.
    2.When it did work it picked up malware better than a Swiffer Mop.

    Two questions in return, Robert.

    1. Assuming that you did not simply take on the role of Benevolent Dictator to your students, did you offer any of them a class assignment along the lines of “make this (single) XP/Win98/M$ whatever PC work?” You didn’t, did you? Wise choice. There’s nothing kids like more than cleaning fluff out of fans with a Q-Tip.
    2. Do you have a good explanation as to why 99 out of every 100 school systems, world-wide, that used Windows and Windows networking somehow didn’t experience the same problems that you did? Because, if they did, the thing would have been dumped en masse.

    I’m guessing that the answers are:
    1) You weren’t a benevolent dictator at all, were you? You were just a dictator. In which case the addition of ” and my students” is completely spurious.
    2) 99 out of 100 computer networks in schools at the time did not take advantage of the Robert Pogson Miracle Cure-All.

    But I don’t want to anchor anybody to these conclusions. There are probably several other, very persuasive, alternative conclusions out there.

  8. wolfgang says:

    …slavery…

    heilig kuh!

    25 years ago, windows 3.o took on the Mac and won. more than 20 years ago, linus set forth and is still hoping. if it can’t get any traction in that much time, why bother, friend?

  9. DrLoser says:

    Seriously, why do people put up with Win-Dohs.

    Because, on a day-to-day basis, it works with a minimum of inconveniences, Dougie? I mean, that’s probably the answer that Thomas of Ockham would give you.

    It’s possible to argue with two billion or more people.

    But it’s difficult.

  10. dougman wrote, “M$ cannot keep its OS consistently working anymore”.

    Oh, it works consistently, for M$ and no one else. Anyone who thinks M$ sells a service should give their head a shake. What they sell is slavery. I don’t want it. Once you’re hooked into M$’s weird way of doing things, it’s very hard to escape.

  11. dougman says:

    http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/12/microsoft-withdraws-bad-windows-7-update-that-broke-future-windows-7-updates/

    This week’s Patch Tuesday updates for Windows 7 has been withdrawn after users discovered that it blocked installation of software containing digital signatures, including first- and third-party software, and even other Windows updates.

    Seriously, why do people put up with Win-Dohs. Lets see, the solution was to download a “patch” to fix.remove the earlier “patches”…ouch.

    Billy should have named his ugly UI “MS Patches”; with all these failing patches, it seems M$ cannot keep its OS consistently working anymore.

  12. Dick Johnson wrote, “After all, windows is very very good at spreading viruses, arguably the best ever.”

    There were exactly two reasons I moved away from that other OS:

    1. It wouldn’t work for me and my students.
    2. When it did work it picked up malware better than a Swiffer Mop.

    I’ve worked in places that actually disconnected from the web during one of the waves of worms. I’ve worked in places where the mean time before failure of that other OS was just a few weeks, and that’s based on the user’s perception of slowing down, not the first instance of malware. ISTR delousing XP-machines that had up to 1K instances of malware. I gave up on that and just re-installed after that. Given enough seats, that became a full-time job and we just migrated to GNU/Linux. Problem solved. Every other problem that naysayers tout about GNU/Linux pales into insignificance compared to the maintenance that other OS requires to survive. That other OS has negative value.

  13. Dick Johnson says:

    Dr Loser quipped “Perhaps they’re using Linux for something that it’s actually good at … spreading viruses and running botnets?”

    Hey, don’t sell microsoft windows short here! After all, windows is very very good at spreading viruses, arguably the best ever. Yes, Linux servers can rapidly and reliably serve data which contains pee cee viruses, but remain immune to the disease, so to speak. OTOH, microsoft windows is quickly infected with any virus it spreads.

  14. DrLoser opined, “you’ll find that the Russian Government’s IT needs cover more than 1.4% of their market”.

    A country the size of Russia probably imports tens of millions of PCs annually. If they consider migrating a million per year by acquisition, the Russian government likely has a few million PCs versus ~100 million altogether so I agree, they are not finished their migration yet but they have done a lot in the last few years. I’m thinking in a few years graduates will be buying their own PCs with GNU/Linux and then you will see a more rapid change. It could get very interesting if Putin were to ban imports or the world were to ban exports of that other OS to/from Russia. Didn’t that happen with Cuba where GNU/Linux is thriving?

  15. Dr Loser says:

    I think you’ll find that the Russian Government’s IT needs cover more than 1.4% of their market, Robert.

    Perhaps they’re using Linux for something that it’s actually good at … spreading viruses and running botnets?

    Not the government with the cleanest hands in the IT world, really. But any old friend in a storm, I suppose.

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