FLOSS And Government In India

FLOSS is the right way to do IT for everyone. Governments may feel FLOSS is unnecessary/different/unusual at their peril. Sooner or later“Indian government software applications are set to make the shift to open source, potentially boosting the pace at which such programmes are developed, and leading to millions of dollars in savings by moving away from proprietary systems.” the cost and complexity of diverse non-Free softwares will bite them, whether it is at budget-time or upgrade-time or just lack of flexibility as their system evolves and their jurisdiction grows.

In India, the governments have had a lot of serious high-priority problems but now that the old regimes, the wars of independence/separation/clash of cultures are receding consideration of the way forward is first and foremost. A very high priority is to modernize and to adopt IT widely in government. India is a huge country with many regions, languages, and cultures. It needs governments with all the necessary IT to make the country manageable. At the same time, many people and regions in India are impoverished and lacking education. Enter FLOSS. With FLOSS, India can afford many more client computers and servers for the same effort/expense. With FLOSS, India can implement one system in IT and replicate it a thousand times all across the country for little more than the cost of the hardware. That allows India to do more with IT and change IT more rapidly.

The present central government and many state governments have adopted GNU/Linux and FLOSS applications widely and while spending $billions annually on IT can get a lot more IT per $billion. Every customized application that is FLOSS in one government can be adapted by every other government and region for zero licensing cost. Further, FLOSS allows the major amount of tweaking that is required to support all the languages and cultures of the country. Non-Free software just doesn’t work for India any more than it works for other countries who may feel that throwing more money at non-Free software is the answer to any problem.

See Govt logs into open source policy to cut software costs.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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24 Responses to FLOSS And Government In India

  1. DrLoser says:

    India is a language mess does not take much homework to find this out.

    Again with the “homework” theme, oiaohm. I’m guessing (with some “homework”) that you are roughly in your late thirties at the moment. Full disclosure — I’m 52, going on 53.

    Unless you take in ironing to help pay the bills, aren’t you a little old for “homework?”

    As for whether or not “India is a language mess …” I’m afraid you will have to take that up with the representatives of the largest democracy on earth, oiaohm.

    The place seems to have worked very well with its constitutional definition of “Official Languages” since 1947, or thereabouts.

    Naturally, oiaohm, you know better. Do tell.

  2. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser Really I wonder how long you will keep on saying NSW. I have never lived in NSW. Sorry the university there was remote study. The northern NSW is a nice screw up of information.

    DrLoser you believe exactly what I have wanted you to about me. The reality you raised the topic now you don’t want to answer for it. India is a language mess does not take much homework to find this out.

    DrLoser you lose so you have to personal attack keep on doing it and get yourself banned again.

  3. DrLoser says:

    This is exactly what I should expect from you DrLoser comment without having your homework in order then being unable deal with it.

    I’m not a psychiatric nurse, oiaohm — they are saints and they are underpaid — but I can’t help noticing that you continually bring this “homework” thing up.

    Is this a particular problem with you? When you were a sparkly little lad in northern NSW, did your homework eat your dog?

    If so, I sympathise. What a rotten way for Old Yeller to meet his end.

    Eaten by a continuous torrent of misappropriated cites picked out of Google without so much as reading past the first paragraph.

    What a terrible end to a pet who would otherwise have made a perfectly decent main dish for a Korean family celebration.

  4. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser I thought you might have known Japanese better.

    Please note one of the official script Konkani is not in ISO/IEC 10646. Good fun.

    Whoops, I am distraught. For some unaccountable reason, I chose not to mention that Konkani is not one of the three official scripts in the Japanese language.

    I really should try harder, shouldn’t I, oiaohm?

    After all, if you are of a mind to spend hours slaving over random Wikipedia links, the least I could do is …

    … to tell you that you are at the very best a disreputable source of any information about any language whatsoever.

    Well, there you go. Done and dusted. In that particular respect, if no other, you are at the very best disreputable.

  5. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser I thought you might have known Japanese better.

    Please note one of the official script Konkani is not in ISO/IEC 10646. Good fun.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konkani_language
    Konkani if you go and look at the top here has 4 different common scripts. ISO 639-3 Language codes only represents 2.
    Goan Konkani is Roman script.
    Maharashtrian Konkani covers the other 3.
    Note the other 3 are independently designed phonetic alphabets. Just because a person can read one of the phonetic alphabets does not mean they can read the other ones. Yes each alphabet requires a different dictionary.

    Problem here they are phonetically written any regional dialect change equals different spelling. Goan has a nice official dictionary independent to pronunciation.

    So just spell checking knn Konkani requires 3 entries unless of course its a official document when only 1 should be accepted.

    You can think of knn as a huge grab bag of languages.

    DrLoser
    I mean, you have a precedent for your completely pointless irrelevance.
    You were the one that brought this topic in here. Ok so you are pointless irrelevant.

    Your raise the subject right here.
    http://mrpogson.com/2014/11/17/floss-and-government-in-india/#comment-218264

    So are you now saying going threw how well languages fit is irrelevence.

    This is exactly what I should expect from you DrLoser comment without having your homework in order then being unable deal with it.

  6. DrLoser says:

    Just one tiny little detail, oiaohm.

    According to the OP, this is a discussion about whether M$ or FLOSS meets the needs of the Indian Government.

    Do feel free to bring kanji, hiragana and katakana into this argument about Office Suites supporting every last one of the official languages of India. I mean, you have a precedent for your completely pointless irrelevance.

    After all, Robert managed to list all sorts of irrelevant crap.

  7. DrLoser says:

    Apparently you’ve dug yourself a massive hole on Official Indian Languages, with specific reference to Konkani, oiaohm. You don’t have anything like the expertise to dig yourself out again.

    But, I am a reasonable man. I acknowledge that you have a completely different vector of utter linguistic incompetence:

    DrLoser take Japaneses that would be more known to you. Its the same you have different script ways of writing the language. With completely different word spellings for the same word.

    I’m pretty much just as ignorant of kanji, hiragana and katakana, oiaohm.

    I do know which two pair up in terms of ISO/IEC 10646, however.

    Seems to me that counting to two is enough. Do you have a third? Is it some obscure pre-Meiji court-based script?

    Ooh, this is going to be informative, isn’t it?

  8. DrLoser says:

    Kadodi, Samvedi, Vadvali, Koli and Agri resembles each other very closely? Yes old english and english resemble each other yes?? This is very much a equal statement.

    If you are either a complete idiot or else somebody who has never read Webster’s 1913 from front to back, oiaohm, then yes, you have a point.

    Unfortunately for you, both the host of this site and I have read Webster’s 1913 from front to back. As it happens, the 1828 edition covers a lot more ground on this one: I’ll use that one. In re “very closely:”

    CLOSELY, adv.

    1. In a close, compact manner; with the parts united, or pressed together, so as to leave no vent; as a crucible closely luted.
    2. Nearly; with little space intervening; applied to space or time; as, to follow closely at ones heels; one event follows closely upon another.
    3. Intently; attentively; with the mind or thoughts fixed; with near inspection; as, to look or attend closely.
    4. Secretly; slyly.
    5. With near affection, attachment or interest; intimately; as, men closely connected in friendship; nations closely allied by treaty.
    6. Strictly; within close limits; without communication abroad; as a prisoner closely confined.
    7. With strict adherence to the original; as, to translate closely.

    One would assume that you are misappropriating “closely” in the seventh of these senses, oiaohm. Although, with you, one never knows.

    In which case I can confidently assert that the “close” difference between Old English (I’ll take Beowulf as the poster child here, but you may vary) and Modern English is, well, not that close at all.

    In passing, one small but interesting fact. Do you know why Modern English has practically no gendered declensions, oiaohm? I imagine not. Let’s face it, you know nothing at all. But this one is interesting: it’s basically the influence of the Danelaw.

    Round about the 9th century in England, you have what is basically a Low Germanic (maybe even Frisian) language on the one side — essentially south and west — and a slightly earlier “Gota” Germanic language on the other. Turns out that most of the (Anglo-Saxon) vocabulary in Modern English came from the south and the west. (There are roughly two to three hundred identifiable Viking period roots — mostly to do with muck and farming, interestingly enough.)

    And the various gender and other inflections got lost, because they simply weren’t needed when talking across the Danelaw boundary.

    Ah well, interesting as that was. We proceed to 1066 and the fact that, for the next two hundred years or so, Norman French was the “official language.”

    And then we proceed to Chaucer’s period, which is still not close to Modern English.

    And then we proceed to the Great Vowel Shift of the 16th and 17th centuries … and this is where it gets relevant.

    Because, according to your cite, the major differences (sans script, which quite honestly is not going to be difficult for anybody with an understanding of Unicode … naturally, you fail on that one) between “Kadodi, Samvedi, Vadvali, Koli and Agri” are, very much, vowel shifts.

    That’s what I get from your cite, oiaohm. I started from a position of ignorance, and I am happy to admit that I am still ignorant.

    But if you can’t magically produce somebody who actually speaks the language … I’m afraid I’m all you’ve got.

  9. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser the problem here Konkani spoken is close enough. The problem is the written.

    Kingsoft only supports 1 form of Konkani. Does not support Goan that is Goa.

    Sorry your quotes DrLoser is just incompetence in reading none of your quotes relates to making a Office suite handle it.

    Kadodi, Samvedi, Vadvali, Koli and Agri resembles each other very closely?
    Yes old english and english resemble each other yes?? This is very much a equal statement.

    DrLoser take Japaneses that would be more known to you. Its the same you have different script ways of writing the language. With completely different word spellings for the same word. Gets worse with Konkani is the direction of read of text is different between the forms. Just because a person can understand Japanese on radio does not mean they can read all the written forms of it. There are 3 different written forms of Japanese. Radio quote has noting todo with making a Office suite that works.

    A Konkani cultural event, Konkani Nirantari, was held in Mangalore on 26 and 27 January 2008?
    Yes that was meant to unify them and be a yearly event. So DrLoser what happened to the 2009 2010…. and so on.

    Taking snippets from the wikipedia without knowing what they mean equals ass kicking DrLoser.

  10. DrLoser blathered on about FLOSS and languages.

    India is a very diverse country. Their own distro BOSS: “The desktop comes with a on-screen keyboard with Indian language support. The Smart Common Input Method tool provides input mechanism for Indian languages Unicode 6.1 support. Currently BOSS GNU/Linux Desktop supports all the Official Indian Languages such as Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Oriya, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Bodo, Urdu, Kashmiri, Maithili, Konkani, Manipuri which will enable the mainly non-English literate users in the country to be exposed to ICT and to use the computer more effectively.” Meanwhile M$ ignored them until recently. Use FLOSS. It’s the right way to do IT.

  11. DrLoser says:

    USAians, apparently. I can live without those. I attended many years of grammar-school. I have multiple dictionaries/thesaurauses beside LO if I need them.

    I’m at a total loss to see how a thesaurus — apparently your in-house spell-checker borked on that one — might be of any possible assistance, Robert.

    As for “multiple dictionaries,” may I quote the only one that ever features here?

    Mul”ti*ple (?), a. [Cf. F. multiple, and E. quadruple, and multiply.] Containing more than once, or more than one; consisting of more than one; manifold; repeated many times; having several, or many, parts. Law of multiple proportion (Chem.), the generalization that when the same elements unite in more than one proportion, forming two or more different compounds, the higher proportions of the elements in such compounds are simple multiplies of the lowest proportion, or the proportions are connected by some simple common factor; thus, iron and oxygen unite in the proportions FeO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, in which compounds, considering the oxygen, 3 and 4 are simple multiplies of 1. Called also the Law of Dalton, from its discoverer. — Multiple algebra, a branch of advanced mathematics that treats of operations upon units compounded of two or more unlike units. — Multiple conjugation (Biol.), a coalescence of many cells (as where an indefinite number of amÅ“boid cells flow together into a single mass) from which conjugation proper and even fertilization may have been evolved. — Multiple fruits. (Bot.) See Collective fruit, under Collective. — Multiple star (Astron.), several stars in close proximity, which appear to form a single system.

    Hooray for Websters 1913! And, whew, that was a whole heap of definition, wasn’t it? I’m guessing you mean “more than one,” although I cannot rule out the possibility that you were referring either to “coalescence of amoeboid cells” or even “collective fruit.”

    Never mind, Robert, you’re entitled to your rather fusty and antiquarian reliance on a single hundred year old dictionary (which happens to be both free and online — you don’t think I’m going to front real cash money for this worthless gibberish, do you>).

    It’s very sweet, in an elderly sort of way.

    Just a shame you can’t write a Libre Office plug-in to make use of it, isn’t it?

  12. DrLoser says:

    Anyhow, I still recommend “a strict diet of nothing but chicken soup.”

    It’s just as effective as Free Libre Open Source Software at solving the knotty little problem of supporting a dozen or so Official State Languages at once.

    (That is to say, it isn’t effective at all. But then again, I’m not the one making this ludicrous claim for FLOSS, am I, oiaohm?)

    It’s very comforting when you have a cold, though. Which is more than FLOSS will do for you.

  13. DrLoser says:

    There is no list that has what each language requires.

    No, but in the context of the present discussion, which is about Indian governmental requirements, I would have thought that basic linguistic support in the Office suite is kinda a given … as requirements go.

    But you don’t need that, do you, oiaohm?

  14. DrLoser says:

    There is a click through link that goes on to nicely describe that the both forms of Konkani are truly completely incompatible.

    What, as in:

    Kadodi, Samvedi, Vadvali, Koli and Agri resembles each other very closely?

    Or:

    All India Radio started broadcasting Konkani news and other services?

    Or:

    A Konkani cultural event, Konkani Nirantari, was held in Mangalore on 26 and 27 January 2008?

    Yes, there’s an assertion (with the usual crappy broken link) that the dialects are often mutually unintelligible. The follow-on from that also points out that Catholic Goanese use the Roman script rather than the native one.

    But unlike you, oiaohm, I prefer to consider my cites (or indeed yours) as a whole. Absent an authentic Konkani voice in this debate, I’m afraid it looks very much like Office Suite X — for some value of X — could quite easily manage Konkani with enough investment. And possibly in two different scripts.

    Which reminds me. The actual underlying argument is about whether Microsoft Office does this sort of thing better or worse than Open/Libre Office. The ramifications of Konkani are of (spurious) interest only to the likes of you, oiaohm.

    If we’re going to concentrate on this one specific official language, out of the very large list I presented earlier, the real question is, which Office Suite is capable of supporting it properly?

    Now, I’d give props to Kingsoft, because they’re backed by Chinese organisations that have a … perhaps “predatory” is the wrong word, but certainly “commercial” interest in India. Particularly in the state of Maharashtra. I can easily imagine that they would see a decent Return On Investment.

    I have zero knowledge, and again I suggest we consult a Konkani expert, but it seems to me that Microsoft would also see a decent Return On Investment.

    I’m pretty damn sure that anybody involved with Open/Libre Office will see precisely zero Return On Investment.

    On balance, therefore, if I were a Konkani, I’d probably go for Kingsoft.

    Also their Office Suite doesn’t inherently blow chunks on formatting, layout, reading in documents from other Office Suites, spreadsheet formulas … the list goes on and on.

    Yup, a Konkani Kingsoft Office Suite would seem to be the obvious winner here.

  15. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser the differences between those languages is in fact written up in the wikipedia of you click threw Konkani on them.

    Now, I could ask the respective speakers from Goa and from the hinterland of Mumbai. Or I could rely upon the extensive knowledge of oiaohm.

    Its not my knowledge at all it was part of the cite. There is a click through link that goes on to nicely describe that the both forms of Konkani are truly completely incompatible.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konkani_language#Script_and_dialect_issues Yes I did make a error Little error Antruz Konkani vs Goan Konkani. They don’t use the same font chars they don’t have the same syntax. Yes Goa uses Goan Konkani and this is only kinda incorrect
    “Maharashtrian Konkani” that is used “Daman and Diu” territory
    Why because Antruz Konkani is one of the sub languages of Maharashtrian Konkani. Its Antruz Konkani used in the “Daman and Diu” territory. Just to add extra to the mix both sides truly hate each other.

    DrLoser Just read up on one language you get a very much clearer idea how big the problem truly is.

    DrLoser basically please stop making comments when you have done absolutely no homework. How hard would it have been to look up the wikipedia page on the laugauge then get up me correct for saying the 1 wrong language name. You could not do that because that would require you not to be a troll.

    Deaf Spy no you got it wrong. Its not ” YouDon’tNeedThat.” It “WeDon’tKnowYouNeedThat”

    There is no list that has what each language requires. Since there is not list is very hard to say this is complete or this is incomplete. Just because a language is missing one of these feature does not mean its incomplete.

  16. DrLoser says:

    I like how oiaohm has fumbled his way back to hyphenation, though. It seems to be an all-consuming passion with him … and, as with all his many other all-consuming passions, I expect he knows nothing at all about it.

    “Ancient Greek,” anyone?

  17. DrLoser says:

    You did well DrLoser this here is the complete list of Languages of India.

    Why, thank you, oiaohm. This is like getting a blessing from the Pope.

    Except that I’m not Catholic.

    By the way this is deceptive as well.

    And … off on a pointless tangent. I don’t know whether a Goanese and a Maharashtri are mutually intelligible in Konkani (though I would expect the written word to make it easier). After all, I as an English speaker can follow both Geordie and Oiaohmish with only the occasional stutter.

    Now, I could ask the respective speakers from Goa and from the hinterland of Mumbai. Or I could rely upon the extensive knowledge of oiaohm

    … a man who has proven himself incapable of understanding anything very much about Chinese, a subject on which he proclaims himself an expert.

    I think I’ll play it safe and assume the default position. I’m pretty sure that the differences make absolutely no difference in terms of an Office document.

    DrLoser I don’t see how anything other than FOSS can handle India mess due to the fact you will need it customized to every state individually.

    And I don’t see how anything other than a strict diet of nothing but chicken soup would work.

    I mean, that’s just as logical as your claim, isn’t it?

  18. Deaf Spy says:

    Classic. YouDon’tNeedThat.

  19. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy depends on the language some languages forbid hyphenation so feature can be pointless. Thesauruses in some languages is also equally pointless. Yes some of those local language that tightly defined don’t have similar words. Some of those languages you need a Phrase book not a Thesauruses. Yes highly not helpful that no Office suite support a Phrase book.

    This is the problem level of support is a little hard to work out. Some with just a dictionary is 100 percent support because the language does not have a define syntax or allow hyphenation or have related words.

    Deaf Spy tools required to support a language change with the language.

    Deaf Spy
    Bah, who needs syntax and grammar checks and thesauruses and hyphenation?
    Basically if someone would answer this question in table somewhere listing all the international language with what ones of grammar/syntax, thesaurus, hyphenation and Phrase book any sense. Yes I would add one being a Phrase book. It would be highly useful to working out how good something language support is.

    Answer who needs that is where you are left highly scratching head.

  20. Deaf Spy wrote, “who needs syntax and grammar checks and thesauruses and hyphenation?”

    USAians, apparently. I can live without those. I attended many years of grammar-school. I have multiple dictionaries/thesaurauses beside LO if I need them.

  21. Deaf Spy says:

    Since when does translating the UI for an office suite count as fully-fledged language support?

    Bah, who needs syntax and grammar checks and thesauruses and hyphenation? These are for the slaves of M$.

  22. oiaohm wrote, “English, Hindi, Gujarati, Urdu, Punjabi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Konkani, Assamese, and a couple of others”.

    I copied that table into a spreadsheet and counted the “y”s in the third column. I got 106… Wow! This is a huge plus for FLOSS, that folks can just translate a list of phrases and help text and make LibreOffice work with another language. This is one reason India is going with FLOSS. They have a zillion languages in one country.

    Language ISO Code Localized UI Language ISO Code Localized UI
    1 Afrikaans af y
    1 Lithuanian / Lietuvių kalba lt y
    1 Albanian / shqip sq y (incl. help system)
    1 Luxembourgish / Lëtzebuergesch lb y
    1 Amharic / አማርኛ am y (incl. help system)
    1 Macedonian / македонски mk y (incl. help system)
    1 Arabic العربيّة ar y
    1 Maithili / मैथिली mai y
    1 Assamese / অসমীয়া as y
    1 Malayalam (India) / മലയാളം ml y
    1 Asturian / Asturianu ast y (incl. help system)
    1 Marathi / मराठी mr y
    1 Basque / euskara eu y (incl. help system)
    1 Meithei / Manipuri / মৈইতৈইলোন mni y
    1 Belarusian / беларуская be y
    1 Mongolian / монгол mn y
    1 Bengali / বাংলা, Bengali (India) / বাংলা (ভারত) bn, bn-IN y (incl. help system)
    1 Ndebele (South)/ Ndébélé nr y
    1 Bodo (India) / बोडो brx y
    1 Nepali / नेपाली ne y (incl. help system)
    1 Bosnian / Bosanski bs y (incl. help system)
    1 Norwegian Bokmål nb y (incl. help system)
    1 Breton / brezhoneg br y
    1 Norwegian Nynorsk nn y (incl. help system)
    1 Bulgarian / български bg y (incl. help system)
    1 Occitan / Occitan-lengadocian oc-FR y
    1 Burmese / မန္မာစာ my y
    1 Oriya / ଓଡ଼ିଆ or y
    1 Catalan / català ca y (incl. help system)
    1 Oromo / Afaan Oromo om y (incl. help system)
    1 (Valencian) / català (valencià) ca-XV y (incl. help system)
    1 Panjabi / Punjabi ਪੰਜਾਬੀ pa y
    1 Chinese (Simplified) / 中文 (简体) zh-CN y (incl. help system)
    1 Persian / Farsi فارسى fa y
    1 Chinese (traditional) / 中文 (正體) zh-TW y (incl. help system)
    1 Polish / polski pl y (incl. help system)
    1 Croatian Hrvatski hr y (incl. help system)
    1 Portuguese / português pt y (incl. help system)
    1 Czech Čeština cs y (incl. help system)
    1 Portuguese (Brazil) / português (Brasil) pt-BR y (incl. help system)
    1 Danish / dansk da y (incl. help system)
    1 Romanian / român ro y
    1 Dogri / डोगरी dgo y
    1 Russian / Русский ru y (incl. help system)
    1 Dutch / Nederlands nl y (incl. help system)
    1 Sanskrit (India) / संस्कृतम् sa y
    1 Dzongkha / རྫོང་ཁ dz y (incl. help system)
    1 Santhali / संथाली sat y
    1 English en-GB, en-US, en-ZA, en-CA y (incl. help system)
    1 Serbian српски / Serbian (latin script) srpski latinicom sr (Cyrillic) sh (Latin) y
    1 Esperanto eo y (incl. help system)
    1 Sidama sid y
    1 Estonian / eesti keel et y (incl. help system)
    1 Sindhi / ﺲﻧﺩھی sd y
    1 Finnish / suomi fi y (incl. help system)
    1 Sinhala / සිංහල si y (incl. help system)
    1 French / français fr y (incl. help system)
    1 Slovak / slovenčina sk y (incl. help system)
    1 Gaelic (Scottish) / Gàidhlig gd y
    1 Slovenian / slovenščina sl y (incl. help system)
    1 Galician / Galego gl y (incl. help system)
    1 Sotho (Northern) / Sesotho sa Leboa nso y
    1 Georgian / ქართული ka y (incl. help system)
    1 Sotho (Southern) / Sesotho st y
    1 German / Deutsch (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) de y (incl. help system)
    1 Spanish / español es y (incl. help system)
    1 Greek / Ελληνικά el y (incl. help system)
    1 Swahili / kiswahili sw y
    1 Gujarati / ગુજરાતી gu y (incl. help system)
    1 Swati / siSwati ss y
    1 Hebrew / עברית he y (incl. help system)
    1 Swedish / Svenska sv y (incl. help system)
    1 Hindi / हिंदी hi y (incl. help system)
    1 Tajik / Tajiki / тоҷикӣ tg y (incl. help system)
    1 Hungarian / magyar hu y (incl. help system)
    1 Tamil தமிழ் ta y
    1 Icelandic / Íslenska is y (incl. help system)
    1 Tatar / татар теле tt y
    1 Indonesian / Bahasa Indonesia id y (incl. help system)
    1 Telugu / తెలుగు te y
    1 Irish / Gaeilge ga y
    1 Thai / ภาษาไทย th y
    1 Italian / Italiano it y (incl. help system)
    1 Tibetan / བོད་ཡིག th y (incl. help system)
    1 Japanese 日本語 ja y (incl. help system)
    1 Tsonga / xiTshonga ts y
    1 Kannada / ಕನ್ನಡ kn y
    1 Tswana / seTswana tn y
    1 Kashmiri / ﻚﺸﻤﻳﺮﻳ ks y
    1 Turkish / Türkçe tr y (incl. help system)
    1 Kazakh / Қазақша kk y
    1 Ukrainian / Українська uk y (incl. help system)
    1 Khmer / ខ្មែរ km y (incl. help system)
    1 Uyghur / Uighur / ﺉۇﻲﻏۇﺭچە ug y (incl. help system)
    1 Kinyarwanda / kinyaRwanda rw y
    1 Uzbek / ўзбек uz y
    1 Konkani / कोंकणी kok y
    1 Venda / tshiVenḓa ve y
    1 Korean / 한국어 [韓國語] ko y (incl. help system)
    1 Vietnamese / tiếng việt vi y (incl. help system)
    1 Kurdish Kurdí / Kurmanji (Kurmancî) kmr-Latn / ku y
    1 Welsh / Cymraeg cy y
    1 Lao / ພາສາລາວ lo y
    1 Xhosa / isiXhosa xh y
    1 Latvian / latviešu lv y
    1 Zulu / isiZulu zu y

    106


  23. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser but Libreoffice does handle German.

    English, Hindi, Gujarati, Urdu, Punjabi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Konkani, Assamese, and a couple of others
    And Microsoft Office does not support most of them.
    https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Language_support_of_LibreOffice
    List of languages. You will find Libreoffice has at least part support for most of them.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_with_official_status_in_India
    You did well DrLoser this here is the complete list of Languages of India. By the way this is deceptive as well.

    Its not Konkani that is an official language in india it is “Goan Konkani” yes sub dialect that is only used in the state of Goa then you have “Maharashtrian Konkani” that is used “Daman and Diu” territory. This is where wikipeida is slightly nasty and deceptive.

    Neither Libreoffice support. Its very hard for Libreoffice to support both the Konkani as both groups don’t refer to their language correctly and just call it Konkani when they are vastly different and incompatible languages. From a sanity point of view outlawing Konkani as an official word could be a good thing and name the two language Maharashtrian and Goan so ending the confusion.

    This is only one of the regional language problems. Most of the languages of india are sub forms. Like the Hindi used in each state is in fact slightly different.

    Anyone attempting to support India in software is in for pain and suffering. Pain that you will need each state to do up there own dictionaries.

    DrLoser I don’t see how anything other than FOSS can handle India mess due to the fact you will need it customized to every state individually.

  24. DrLoser says:

    Further, FLOSS allows the major amount of tweaking that is required to support all the languages and cultures of the country.

    Wonderful weaselly little word, “allows,” isn’t it? And, hard though it might be for you to believe, closed source software (M$, Apple, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX, etc) “allow” precisely the same thing.

    India’s official languages?

    English, Hindi, Gujarati, Urdu, Punjabi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Konkani, Assamese, and a couple of others.

    LibreOffice doesn’t even handle German very well, the last time I looked. What chance does it have with this lot?

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