Google Chromebooks – Price And Performance

I may not know much about business but I can do the maths.“Starting immediately, businesses can purchase the Chromebook for Work advanced software features, management, and support through a new annual subscription option of $50 per device per year.” Compared to what I’ve read many are paying for the privilege of running a PC in business, $50 per annum is peanuts. I can see small businesses/startups lapping up Google’s offer. M$ has been costing them half of that just to plug in a PC let alone all the hand-holding that goes on. This must be the easiest rode to GNU/Linux on the planet for newbies or professionals. It’s one-stop shopping for all of the client IT. Just get all the applications residing on a server somewhere…

I’ve long been an advocate of thin clients. This is probably easier because no local server is required except the usual router/DHCP server. I imagine individuals and small organizations would love this. One annual payment taking care of IT… It can’t get any easier than this can it? If I weren’t retired and I didn’t enjoy the admin stuff I do, I could go for this. I’ll bet most businesses could get 80% of employees on such a scheme. I expect many will try a few seats at least to check this out real soon.

See Google targets businesses with Chromebooks for Work.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to Google Chromebooks – Price And Performance

  1. ram says:

    Well that is not going to fly if they don’t work with ext2/3/4 formatted memory sticks.

  2. DrLoser says:

    Now, I don’t wish to demean your intellectual capaticy, Dougie. Nor do I wish to question your ability to understand the fundamentals of macro-economics.

    With both the U.S. and the UK at negative GDP, bottom-feeder bargain-bin computers will be the future.

    What, precisely, is a “negative GDP?”

  3. dougman says:

    With both the U.S. and the UK at negative GDP, bottom-feeder bargain-bin computers will be the future.

    Why would someone need double the amount of cores or a new screen? Understandably, M$ would love for consumers to buy new hardware, and by adding in copious amount of code of course you need more cores, ram, etc..

    Google, transcended all that mess, and is just presenting you with a browser OS with various apps.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLUPlTA9gsY

    Obviously, the old guard, M$ and its nefarious asshats would prefer you, the consumer, to not even consider a Chromebook an option, they rather you to spend $1000 on a Surface device that M$ will more then likely cancel as a product in the future.

  4. DrLoser says:

    Dougie, Dougie, Dougie:

    I own two Chromebooks (Samsung 11″ & HP 14″), they will always be the latest and greatest

    Always? I’d hate to think that the two respective product lines will not progress to, say, doubling the amount of cores or even building in something like a next-gen screen, Dougie. But first love is always the sweetest, isn’t it?

    Until you’re let down and it turns bitter and sour. Well, don’t claim that your friends didn’t warn you.

    …with automatic upgrades.

    Good to know that you trust the general Downstream Model on this one, Dougie. Although to be fair it has improved to an LTS model.

    Two years of automatic upgrades should be good enough for anybody if they consciously rely on bottom-feeder bargain-bin barely usable trash.

  5. dougman says:

    I own two Chromebooks (Samsung 11″ & HP 14″), they will always be the latest and greatest, with automatic upgrades.

  6. DrLoser says:

    One annual payment taking care of IT…

    This is getting dangerously close to Microsoft Office 365, isn’t it?

    We must be eternally vigilant, Robert, lest the Devil bites us in the nuts.

  7. DrLoser says:

    What’s “rode,” easy or otherwise, Robert? Possibly “rodes” are not quite as easy or cheap as you profess to believe.

    Just get all the applications residing on a server somewhere…

    Well, that should be entirely straight-forward. Not.

    It astonishes me that you sacrificed the last half of your professional life teaching in the sub-arctic when you could have literally made tens of millions explaining to any company from SMEs upwards that they can save hundreds of millions this way.

    Don’t hide your light under a bushel, Robert — go out and make yourself a fortune!

    I will of course, as your agent, charge you 20% for this suggestion. But then again, 20% of nothing is nothing, isn’t it?

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