Google Doing Good

Google has long promised to “do no evil”. They’ve done better than that.“Google announced a $50 million initiative to teach young girls how to code, Google has promised to do all it can to recruit more women into Silicon Valley. Along with Chelsea Clinton, Girls Inc., Girl Scouts of the USA, Mindy Kaling, MIT Media Lab, National Center for Women & Information Technology, SevenTeen, TechCrunch and more, Google is launching Made with Code, an initiative to inspire girls to code” They are doing good by promoting computer programming for young women, really young women, actually girls. They have to because girls have been getting tracked away from computer science earlier than ever. That could be part of the success of IT in the world, bringing more information to everyone everywhere. Google found it had to get the message across earlier if it wanted to have more women in its own workforce. Good for Google.

See Google investing $50 million to get girls to code.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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6 Responses to Google Doing Good

  1. JD wrote, “Someone who had the skills and aptitude wasn’t denied the opportunity to achieve their dreams because of their gender or race. That doesn’t mean we have to try and shoehorn everyone into the same mold.”

    Whatever the reasons, many women don’t see programming as part of their lives. Google is doing good to change that. It’s not about forcing women to programme. It’s about showing them they have the choice.

  2. JD says:

    Interesting anecdote sir, but with all due respect, I still don’t see the point you are making.

    Are you saying that with enough funding, all women will be as smart as this one? To me, the fact that she was able to drop in and ace the class is proof that the system is working perfectly as is. Someone who had the skills and aptitude wasn’t denied the opportunity to achieve their dreams because of their gender or race. That doesn’t mean we have to try and shoehorn everyone into the same mold.

    It is one thing to support someone who is aspiring to get somewhere, but lack the financial resources to get there. Scholarships / grants for higher education is a good example. But by making funding available only to women, Google is artificially tilting the playing field, and the result is those who are better skilled will be denied an opportunity to achieve their dreams.

    I come from a different country and I saw this everywhere when growing up. A student in the top 99th percentile would be denied entry into medical or engineering school because of their gender / race, while someone who barely sqeaked through school would get in. Ultimately this resulted in lowering the quality of medical care / engineering in the country. Those who were highly adept but were discriminated against simply moved to other countries with better opportunities. Ultimately, it was a lose / lose for my home country. I am yet to see one affirmative action program there that actually produced better results or what was promised in the long run. I doubt it will be any different here. Positive discrimination is a slippery slope, and once you get people hooked on it, it is all downhill from there.

    Google doing good? I don’t think so. More like Google seeing a chance at some positive PR for themselves and throwing some cash to capitalize on it.

  3. kurkosdr wrote, “I don’t understand why women have to be “encouraged” to go to IT and engineering sectors. Let them choose freely.”

    I do understand. Being a family-man and having been a teacher and a student for decades, I can state without reservation that women do some things differently and any business or organization is better off with the increased diversity that women supply. e.g. Women seem to be able to tell if a fellow’s socks don’t match from ~100 yards away. Such attention to details that a man might not notice or consider important could be important for any business supplying goods or services to women. There are thousands of such contributions that women can and do make to organizations.

    I was fortunate/unfortunate (depending on your point of view) to have survived the Honours Physics programme at the University of Manitoba. In those days Physics was almost exclusively the domain of men. Of 24 students in my class, not one was a women. All our professors were men. I think there was a women or two in previous and subsequent classes. Out of nowhere a women “dropped in” to one of our toughest classes. She was a maths student and needed a minimum number of science courses to meet the requirements of the university. Rather than taking physics 101 or some easy course, she chose the most challenging. She aced it. Perfect scores. She graduated, went into the faculty of Medicine and now is the head of a major hospital in Canada. Women like her or even the run of the mill woman are great assets for any organization with any purpose whatever.

  4. kurkosdr says:

    @JD

    Exaclty, I don’t understand why women have to be “encouraged” to go to IT and engineering sectors. Let them choose freely.

  5. JD says:

    Positive discrimiation is still discrimination. Looks like a PR move to me.

  6. Ivan says:

    This is just lame PR from a company that has a problem with its current hiring practices.

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