Android/Linux Leaving That Other OS Behind In Emerging Markets

The next billion users are skipping Wintel along with all the costs and burdens of the monopoly. Bill Gates’ worst fears are becoming reality. Today, the smartphone running Android/Linux is freeing ordinary people from M$’s monopoly. While M$ took years to get the first few million slaves signed up, Android/Linux is freeing that many people every week.

Chuckle… Interestingly, the semi-smart phone that knocked that other OS off the web was not Android/Linux but the Asha Series 40 feature phones from Nokia. M$ bought the division hoping to promote Phoney “7”… HAHAHA! Now Android/Linux has left Series 40 in its dust. Lately, Series 40 had 23% share while Android/Linux had 31% share in Kenya. Android/Linux is growing rapidly in Kenya while Series 40 is dropping fast.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to Android/Linux Leaving That Other OS Behind In Emerging Markets

  1. oiaohm wrote, ” You have more luck with a pet dog or cat picking shares than using sharemarket experts.”

    Just like Wintel has its sycophants, various stocks and stock-segments have their fanbois.

  2. oiaohm says:

    Wolfgang goldman-sachs also said Enron was a good and solid company a week before it went under. There history of being correct is not good. History of sharemarket experts being incorrect is funny. You have more luck with a pet dog or cat picking shares than using sharemarket experts.

    Device makers have a fairly long memory they remember when Microsoft was on top of the OS market and how much Microsoft wanted . So to them it cheaper to pay the patents. Now if they can reduce the patents and pay less the better.

    Microsoft did most of these patent deals without handing over lists of patents. I personally believe it should be illegal to make a patent deal without swapping lists.

  3. wolfgang says:

    …not enough money…

    pogson say not enough, goldman-sachs say plenty of money. hard to tell who is right when such experts disagree.

  4. wolfgang wrote, “microsoft getting so much money from android”.

    It’s not even enough money to make a line-item yet. They are not getting huge $ per phone. In the latest 10-Q M$ mentions “Microsoft asserts 14 patents are infringed by Motorola Android devices and certain Motorola digital video recorders. “

    and Devices and Consumers licensing was ~$4b for the quarter, about what M$’s desktop OS used to take in. They are actually losing money on the hardware they ship and they don’t charge themselves a royalty.

  5. wolfgang says:

    …dougman say only 80 patents…

    only take 1 to clog use maybe. Interesting thought, too, is that microsoft getting so much money from android according to doughman cite that maybe they make less money if android suppliers switch to windows phone os instead.

  6. dougman wrote, “One in-house counsel for a major Asian firm said that, after checking the full list and taking out duplicates, they found multiple invalid and expired patents, and standard essential patents covered by fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms (FRAND).”

    Burke (?): “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing”

    OEMs should self-insure themselves against M$ and other patent-trolls and form some entity to sue M$, for refunds and to get court orders to cease and desist.

  7. dougman says:

    Seems karma is coming to PatchSoft.

    http://www.zdnet.com/microsofts-android-patents-will-face-challenges-7000030698/

    “As a result of Motorola Mobility’s relative success, and the Chinese patent revelations, some firms are re-considering their Microsoft patent licenses. One in-house counsel for a major Asian firm said that, after checking the full list and taking out duplicates, they found multiple invalid and expired patents, and standard essential patents covered by fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms (FRAND). Once those were taken out, by this firm’s count, Microsoft only had 80 relevant patents. The company also believes that many of these — if someone were to file for a reexamination of them — might be invalidated.

    Another firm is considering suing Microsoft over the current terms of its patent license. Still, another corporate attorney suggested that the mere threats of either litigation or seeking to have the patents invalidated might be enough to get Microsoft to reduce the costs of its patent licenses. While it’s unlikely that a company would seek to have any of Microsoft’s patents invalidated at the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), pro-open source and anti-patent groups may seek to do exactly that. “

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