Schools Changing From XP to GNU/Linux And Loving It

“With Microsoft’s stated end-of-life for Windows XP in April 2014, we are now preparing to transition the majority of our remaining XP computers to largely Linux and open source systems. We have developed strategies for helping teachers who instruct digital media, industrial education, business education, and so forth to use software which will run on our Linux diskless client systems and support the curriculum. This is not without its challenges, however, as the same support structure developed for our first implementation we will see another approximately 500 workstations move to open source computing models. The aggregate total of our existing 2250 Linux diskless clients will swell to over 2700 systems across 16 sites.”

That’s much bigger than any migration I ever did but the mechanics are the same. Schools can choose to:

  • move away from M$’s bloatware and malware,
  • to the beauty of FLOSS on GNU/Linux or
  • just cut the budget.

It all works with FLOSS, the right way to do IT.

See How to upgrade your school system to open source.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in technology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Schools Changing From XP to GNU/Linux And Loving It

  1. ram says:

    These Linux machines will also be able to run the vast amount of educational software available for Linux. This will make a huge difference, especially to the brighter more dedicated students.

  2. dougman quoth, “Chromebooks are fast to use, and don’t slow down over time. They have layers of security built-in, so don’t need to buy or install antivirus software.”

    Amen! The world has been waiting for that kind of simplicity in IT. I had it a decade ago with GNU/Linux. Now the rest of mankind will be getting it with Chrome OS GNU/Linux. 2014 is going to be the end of monopoly if 2013 didn’t do it in already. I think it all boils down to retail shelf-space. GNU/Linux is finally getting some on a global scale. Chromebooks were accepted well in USA/UK and now the OEMs are going to crank them out for the rest of the world.

  3. dougman says:

    LG has as very nice desktop all in one Chromebase now, plug in a mouse and keyboard and away you go.

    http://www.engadget.com/2013/12/17/lg-chromebase-aio/

    For movable devices the Samsung Series 5 Chromebook works 24/7 and offers a multi-second boot.

    http://www.samsung.com/us/computer/chromebook

    “The (Always) New Computer
    Chromebooks are fast to use, and don’t slow down over time. They have layers of security built-in, so don’t need to buy or install antivirus software. They come with apps for all your everyday needs, and keep your files safely backed up on the cloud. And with free, automatic updates, your Chromebook keeps getting better and better.”

    Also, Samsung seems to have a new 12″ Chromebook in the works built with an i5 processor sweet. http://www.samsung.com/us/computer/chrome-os-devices/XE550C22-A02US

Leave a Reply