8-core CPUs For Smartphones

Well, one of the things using FLOSS does is allow one to spend more on hardware and less on software…
“A number of first-tier China-based handset vendors are to unveil their new models powered by MediaTek’s 8-core CPUs prior to the Lunar New Year holidays, with second- and third-tier vendors to follow suit later”

It’s all good.

See 8-core CPU shipments to boost MediaTek December and 4Q13 revenues.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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3 Responses to 8-core CPUs For Smartphones

  1. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr the Linux kernel was used by the Bluetooth 4.0 developers when the standard was being written. So Linux had Bluetooth 4.0 on the day the standard was released.

    Waiting for the standard to be released is in fact too late. Particular when things get included that are not the way your OS does things.

    The reason why Windows Phone has so much trouble keeping up is hardware makers don’t have open usage of the OS core source code to experiment with and develop new standards.

    Android Multi core support is heavily the Linux kernel. There is many upper points in Android that are not Multi core compatible.

  2. kurkosdr wrote, “They claim that using 8 weaker CPU cores (Cortex A7) results in higher performance, better battery life and less heat than using 4 Krait cores (aka what Qualcomm’s SoC do).”

    Assuming a busy system, that is legitimate. The power dissipation per flipping bit varies as the square of the frequency, so increasing the number of cores (bits) and reducing the frequency can pay off. The thing is, how do you keep a smartphone busy on a bunch of cores? I suppose there will be some power-management shutting down unused cores. This power-scaling is the same effect we saw with x86/amd64 recently. Folks needed more throughput but could not raise clockspeed because of local heating. Essentially, double the number of cores with 70% of the clockspeed keeps the same power with 40% increase in throughput or you can double the number of cores and cut the clockspeed in half for the same throughput at half the energy wastage. OTOH, it is a more costly chip so expect this technology to appear in the first-class devices first. It sounds like the technology will take a year or so to sift down to “others” but it will happen sooner than Wintel can adjust.

  3. kurkosdr says:

    I am looking forward to see some benchmarks, particularly regarding battery and heat. Mediatek has made some pretty lofty claims about this SoC. They claim that using 8 weaker CPU cores (Cortex A7) results in higher performance, better battery life and less heat than using 4 Krait cores (aka what Qualcomm’s SoC do).

    “one of the things using FLOSS does is allow one to spend more on hardware and less on software”
    Windows Phone has always being one step behind in the hardware game than Android (and some times iOS). So, at a given time, you can’t get a windows phone with really top hardware, no matter how much you have in the bank. Android got multicore CPUs (which allow for 1080p video recording), 720p and 1080p screens, support for external SDs and support for Bluetooth 4.0 before WP did. MS says mobile is a first priority to them, but the pace they put support for new hardware in WP suggests otherwise. Couldn’t they have hired someone to write some Bluetooth 4.0 support for WP the moment it was standardized, so WP got Bluetooth 4.0 the same time Android did? It’s not like MS don’t have the cash.

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