LibreOffice Saves Valencia A Ton Of Money

“The administration of the Spanish autonomous region of Valencia has completed its switch to LibreOffice, a free and open source suite of office productivity applications. Last week Friday the region’s ICT department announced that the office suite is installed on all of the 120,000 desktop PCs of the administration, including schools and courts. The migration will save the government some 1.5 million euro per year on proprietary software licences.”

see Valencia region government completes switch to LibreOffice.

So, what’s holding you back? If you or your organization uses an office suite and you are stuck on M$’s treadmill, get off. Download, install and run LibreOffice today. It’s Free Software. You can run, examine, modify and distribute it with the licence that comes with the code. Better yet, run it on GNU/Linux, an operating system that works for you instead of M$.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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31 Responses to LibreOffice Saves Valencia A Ton Of Money

  1. oiaohm says:

    bw if you are talking benefits. For max benefits schools should have both. Since Libreoffice/OpenOffice is a no charge install and includes many features MS Office lacks or has removed over time.

    https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Feature_Comparison:_LibreOffice_-_Microsoft_Office

    There is in fact a lot of features Libreoffice can do that MS Office cannot bw.

    In fact a school offering more language subjects can find that MS Office does not support the language they wish to teach where Libreoffice and OpenOffice do.

    Reality here for ODF support LibreOffice and OpenOffice are the two everything else is compared to include MS Office.

    So the three standard leaders are LibreOffice, OpenOffice and MS Office. Everything else is compared to those 3.

    bw idiot narrow mindless at work again. Microsoft Office was feature ahead of most others. The reality is the times of this has passed. Both Libreoffice and OpenOffice are now to a point of feature balance with MS Office. The question I have is what new features can MS Office add to move the balance back in there direction or will it keep on sliding over to the open source and mixed source camp. OpenOffice is by IBM and Apache is more openly licensed to allow mixed source to come from that. So anyone wanting to start a closed source competitor against MS Office now does not have to start from scratch.

  2. dougman says:

    BW has retirement money to blow on M$, ahhh I see. If it bothers you so much, why don’t you make a charitable contribution, eh?

  3. oiaohm wrote, “Linux share is not exactly non existent. Lot of the growth of Linux has been extending the life of existing hardware. Could explain the declining sales in the PC market.
    Basically something is happening. The question is how bad will it get.”

    I like to think how good it will get… The world is not a better place with M$ growing and increasing the bloat in IT. The world is a better place with M$ becoming a shadow of its former presence. It’s just too bad that change has been slow. It looks like change that used to take a few years is now taking a few months. That’s more my speed.

  4. bw says:

    See, even the San Luis Coastal Unified School District understands the benefits of not choosing M$

    I think that you have misstated the issue here. It should read “See, only the San Luis Coastal Unified School District fails to see the benefits of choosing Microsoft Office, which is the standard by which all others are compared”

  5. dougman says:

    BW, thinking? Heaven help us!!

    See, even the San Luis Coastal Unified School District understands the benefits of not choosing M$.

    “The state budget has created a situation where school districts are looking for cost savings
    whenever possible. By moving to a free office suite for all new computers and laptops, SLCUSD
    has been able to save over $32,000 this summer as opposed to purchasing Microsoft Office.”

    http://www.slcusd.org/nmd_alternation/assets/user_files/files/libreoffice_intro.pdf

    Thats $32K, instead of going to M$, stays at the school to be utilized for other needs.

  6. oiaohm says:

    bw
    “I think that my original observation that the kind of savings touted for using Libre Office in lieu of MS Office are not sufficient to persuade any real company to take the risk inherent in relying on such a rag-tag organization to keep their own business current with any new developments in office automation technology and/or compatible with past operations.”
    Bullshit artist at work again. There are real examples out there of real companies choosing LIbreoffice over MS Office. Libreoffice foundation is a formal structure so not rag tag.

    This is why I call you a moron/idiot bw. How many documents do you really want to drop on top of you. Result you will still lose even if you don’t answer me bw.

  7. oiaohm says:

    bw really you are in no position to talk about distorted point of view. You had what Libreoffice is completely wrong.

    Linux share is not exactly non existent. Lot of the growth of Linux has been extending the life of existing hardware. Could explain the declining sales in the PC market.

    Basically something is happening. The question is how bad will it get.

  8. bw says:

    Don’t confuse the area under a region of a graph of productivity v producers with production over time

    If that is what the graph is about then I acknowledge that I was confused. The graph had a label saying “12 months” and the abscissa looked like a number of days for a year. Fooled me, that’s for sure!

    I think that my original observation that the kind of savings touted for using Libre Office in lieu of MS Office are not sufficient to persuade any real company to take the risk inherent in relying on such a rag-tag organization to keep their own business current with any new developments in office automation technology and/or compatible with past operations.

  9. bw says:

    bw should brace himself if his pension depends on M$’s health

    No worries here. You focus on client division financials, but Microsoft is much more than that, your analogies notwithstanding either.

    One thing you gloss over is the lofty altitude from which the client division has yet to fall. You enthuse about miniscule victories for Linux which, from their almost non-existent position, have significant percentage variances while harping on financial declines that are just a small part of Microsoft profits overall. That is giving you a distorted view, I think.

  10. bw, not understanding statistics wrote, ” it does show a sharp decline in activity.”

    Don’t confuse the area under a region of a graph of productivity v producers with production over time. They are quite different things. Production has slowed a bit but certainly is not declining. There is another factor: removing kludge and fixing bugs. Clearly, over time there will be less kludge to remove and bug-fixing is going well. Then there are new features… However you slice it, LibreOffice is very healthy compared to OpenOffice.org whose key advantage is a larger installed base for the moment. Personally, I find LibreOffice very solid and mostly responsive to my needs. I lack only one feature at the moment, the ability to set default styling for charts. I can get around that with templates or editing the code but I would like to have a stable of several types of charts as well as a stable of several types of documents. Nothing prevents TDF from developing this functionality and the rest works so well that I am happy with what they offer. I am a fussy guy. I look for deficiencies. If my wishlist is down to one item LibreOffice can certainly meet the needs of a very wide variety of users.

  11. bw wrote, “Of course “trolling” here is not going to do that for anyone. Rather posting here is entertainment of a sort for me. With such insipid efforts as you are providing, I cannot understand what you get out of it. Pogson poses situations that he thinks proves that Linux is thriving and Microsoft is declining. I look for flaws in his constructions and tell him.”

    Has anyone other than bw not noticed that M$’s client division is in decline. There was even a huge write-down of $900million and Ballmer is slated to retire sooner rather than later. M$ is in crisis mode. In principle, if M$ were a normal business they could let the client division decline and move on to profitable lines of business but they can’t because their empire is a house of cards depending on all those hundreds of millions of client PCs running their pet OS. The failure of “8” to do more than clutter retail shelves is a crisis on top of other recent crises such as waves of malware, Vista and GNU/Linux eating into the retail monopoly. If a house of cards is not a good analogy perhaps a chicken’s egg will do better. The egg is a tough package until that shell cracks… The client division is the protective shell of M$ and it’s cracking. M$’s market power seems limited to retail shelves and business flat spots of obsolete products. Since M$’s whole business is built on monopoly and that’s fading quickly, M$ is in danger of having to work for a living instead of just counting the cash-flow. Of course, M$ could retire and live off its income but that is a short term solution to the problem of them being grossly uncompetitive. They did it to themselves so I am not sad but bw should brace himself if his pension depends on M$’s health.

  12. oiaohm says:

    bw There is a problem there has been more code submits in 2013 than 2012 to libreoffice. So companies submitting the same today as 2012 will have a smaller graphic section.

    Reality there is more activity not less. You are making presumes without checking out the data again bw. Increased number of commits moves stuff around quite a lot.

    bw you must agree that you cannot call libreoffice a volunteer project with over 50 percent being done by personal being paid professionals with full time work at places like Redhat, Suse, code-weavers…. that is conformable without question.

    There have been a lot more solo once off submits in 2013 than 2012.

    http://documentfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/developers2.jpg

    Number of commits per month are still increasing it has not levelled off yet bw.

    Please note bw the top 50 are listed going down from most to least. Over 80 percent of the work is done by the developers do 50 commits or more. With majority of that being full time employed or coders for higher. Yes coders for higher without a officially company are called volunteers in Libreoffice Numbers.

    The long tail is there are a lot of developers doing small ammounts.

    http://documentfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/developers4.jpg
    bw to read the graph here.

    Up the 2000-0 up side of graph is number of commits.

    Along bottom of graph is developer number. This is ordered from largest number of commits to least. So developer 1 is the one that submitted the most developers 346-351 written as “346 351” barely submitted 1.

    Basically is shows how much work is done by commercials compared to volunteers.

    You have noticed 49 names are listed for submitting more than 50 commits. Go a long the bottom of the graph to 49 location and notice everything before 49 out numbers everything after 49 by a large margin.

    Nothing has really changed in graph shape over the last 12 months there are a few more developers in the +50 camp than 12 months ago bw. Yes 50 plus is normally commercial somewhere.

  13. bw says:

    Troll protecting his livelihood.

    My livelihood does not derive from selling anything anymore. It derives from a hodge-podge of small pensions, annuities, and Social Security payments that cover basic needs for food, shelter, transportation, and day to day entertainment.

    There was a day not too long ago that I was very concerned with selling things and convincing customers that our wares were just what they needed to guarantee the safety of their crucial information and keep their businesses humming. Even then I didn’t sell any Microsoft products. Microsoft was a customer, though.

    You, on the other hand, seem to depend on being able to scare a few unfortunates, who have no idea about the inner workings of their PC, into paying you for advice. Since that fear depends on how you can paint Microsoft as incompetent, you actually do have a need to protect your livelihood.

    Of course “trolling” here is not going to do that for anyone. Rather posting here is entertainment of a sort for me. With such insipid efforts as you are providing, I cannot understand what you get out of it. Pogson poses situations that he thinks proves that Linux is thriving and Microsoft is declining. I look for flaws in his constructions and tell him.

    I have a lot of experience with major corporations who were either customers or employers over the years from IBM through Unix workstations and servers down to Windows networks and even Linux. I have lived in the commercial software development environment and I know how it works.

    You do not.

  14. bw says:

    the top 50 committers

    What sort of story do you think is told by that graph? If the 49 names each account for 50 or more changes to the source tree, then the thinnest wedge might be considered t be 50, making the top enders doing a thousand or more changes. Then what is the area graph with the “long tail” supposed to represent? And why is it a tail? Have most of the developers packed it in over the past 12 months after a flurry of activity 12 months ago? Maybe the employers of the top dogs here have whistled them back into doing some in-house work for their own companies, mostly RHT and SUSE.

    Whatever it is, it does show a sharp decline in activity.

  15. ram says:

    I think most FLOSS developers are paid to develop certain aspects of FLOSS. They may, or may not, be full time working for a single company, but I know that my company, and many others like mine, hire certain experienced developers to add in features we really want. It does not hurt us if many other people also benefit from those code improvements.

    We also tend not to advertise our sponsorship of code improvements as we don’t want our competitors of the day seeing what we regard as important.

  16. dougman says:

    BW sells M$, this is why he disses Libreoffice and anything to do with FOSS.

    Troll protecting his livelihood.

  17. oiaohm says:

    bw there is flux in the libreoffice numbers. Also depends on who you class as important.

    http://documentfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/developers6.jpg

    The image robbert used is a generic. Where a person who does 1 commit is held equal to those who do many.

    Bw the fact is 50 percent of the work on Libreoffice are done by 2 companies. Redhat and Suse using full time developers.

    This does in fact explain why some windows support is very slow to come. Windows developers are missing.

    The Affiliation test is horrible bad as well. Even if someone works for a company and is paid. If they don’t declare Affiliation they are a volunteer.

    Reality my claim of 60 percent+ is commercial development is based on amount of work done.

    bw truth lies and statistics. Depend on what statistic you read depend on if you class Libreoffice as Majority Volunteer. But this means you have to count every person submitting 1 patch equal to those submitting thousands.

    Or me who classes as 60 percent commercial development because 60 percent of the work is done by paid full time developers. It takes many part timers to equal 1 full time developers threw put.

    So bw what number should we go by.

    http://blog.documentfoundation.org/2013/07/22/getting-close-to-libreoffice-4-1/

    Of course a troll is not going to look at libreoffice and go by commits to do the stats based on ammount of work done.

    Major FOSS projects show the same thing in commits majority are full time developers paid.

  18. dougman says:

    As with anything, Pareto’s 80/20 Law would apply in this situation.

    Broken Windows is really grasping for straws, as to say that FOSS devs are inferior to corporate devs., does it even matter?

    I would take three VERY passionate devs over a team of twenty that are in it, just for the buck.

    In the old days, say five years ago, people like passionate devs had a long road ahead of them. There were no apps, and no apps stores. There was no distribution system for software that people invented on nights and weekends.

    Today, hundreds of thousands of entrepreneurs have attracted customers without raising a penny in venture capital, and without jumping through the hoops that used to drive tech entrepreneurs crazy.

    A big corporation should be fearful of the little people out there, doing something that they are passionate about, because, passion trumps money. Passionate people love what they do, and feel fortunate to be able to solve interesting problems.

    Large companies that cannot get past their own inertia, look worse and worse compared to the army of passionate devs and entrepreneurs headed their way.

    8 Reasons Passion Trumps Money Any Day of the Week

    1. The days are longer if you are not passionate about what you are doing. Ever been out on an enjoyable date and the hours flew by? Imagine getting paid to work for what seems like a few hours a day when in reality it is 8 or 9. That’s what passion does for you.

    2. Working for money is tiring and soul destroying in the long run. Working with passion means never having trouble getting out of bed to get to work. Sure you could be physically tired occasionally, but when tired is coupled with a job that is tolerated for all the wrong reasons, everything is that much harder and much more of a drudge.

    3. The money will more than likely come anyway because you are effortlessly putting in the hours without even feeling them.

    4. Should the money fade you will still have passion. This is a very privileged position. There are a lot of people who have not found their passion. With both money and passion together it will be mind blowing.

    5. It is harder to be misdirected from your path when you have passion. You get a stronger gut feeling with true passion. It comes from having studied an area of interest for a long time. You become more confident about yourself and your subject.

    6. Not many people are fulfilled by money. I have spent a lot of time in very monied company. One thing that hung over me like a bad smell was a deep sense of dissatisfaction and disenchantment. If this was merely a few people I had met I would pass it off as coincidence. However this was not the case. On the other hand, my time with folks on the other end of the spectrum in various parts of the world was fairly rich and joyful. The trick is to have both! Financial satisfaction and fulfillment.

    7. True passion comes from within and therefore is one of the few things that we have absolute control over. Even if we are careful with our own money, banks, governments or pension fund managers can do things on our behalf that diminishes our hard won cash. Only we can allow our passion to diminish or grow.

    8. Passion is magical and intangible. Unlike money it cannot be stolen or taken. For example, the folks who go on talent shows and listen to a judge being negative about them and then emerge tearfully saying that their ‘career’ is all over never had true passion or undaunted desire in the first place.

  19. bw blathered on” that “most” are volunteers”

    Clearly that is not relevant to anything. The majority of commits are by very experienced developers of any affiliation. The latest information arrived recently from the blog. They’ve had 800 developers involved since 2010.

    It looks as if the top 50 committers in the last while are about 50% “volunteers”. That does not mean they are amateurs at all. It may just be that their employers don’t officially sanction the contributions. It may well be that they are self-employed, or students too.

  20. bw says:

    Many are volunteers.

    “Many” seems to be a vain attempt to soft-pedal the fact that your own data here shows that “most” are volunteers. If one dares to scale a drawing of that nature, you can also see that the percentage of volunteers is increasing from the inner ring to the more recent outer.

    It is hard to tell exactly due to the funky 3-D tilt in the chart, but it looks to me like the percentage of wannbes at work on LibreOffice is about 75%, the 20% claim of your toady nothwithstanding.

  21. oiaohm says:

    Wannabe developers don’t pass go in the Major FOSS projects.

    bw the reality is over 60 percent of all developers work Libreoffice and some other projects in the same class like KDE. Own to support companies. Yes less than 20 percent are any form of volunteer. So what is the 20 percent in the middle large end users with there own internal staff and projects.

    bw its not just some cases being paid. Its the majority of cases being paid.

    Healthy FOSS project you are looking for a project where the team is reasonably large and over 50 percent of the developers are paid.

    The Linux kernel is different with the majority owning to Hardware makers with Support companies running second.

    Yes majority of major open source projects are paid staff. With a very big chunk coming from companies selling support to end consumers as their business model.

    So majority of cases with FOSS developers are supported by companies that are making there money other ways. Like selling support contracts or developer time.

    Plausible offer is simple Redhat SUSE and others hold highly experienced developers who can get the code fixed properly with submit rights todo so. You can attempt todo it alone but its simpler to get your alteration upstream if you grease some-ones palm with silver with a support contract.

    Bw tell me truthfully if you were working at Redhat Suse or some other Linux support company. Who would you respond to first. The person with subscription or the person without. The answer is person with subscription. The person without gets listen to when you have time.

    This is why FOSS is not a free lunch. There is a bribe culture. Beer/Cash/something.

    bw the other big problem is majority of FOSS developers are also Closed source code developers. Yes over 50 percent of Libreoffice developers also work on other projects for the companies they are employed by that may not be open source.

    The reality the majority FOSS developers are the Eggs and Ham in your example.

    Libreoffice is a back-end part to Alfresco and other items. Just like a person might make a closed source application on a LAMP stack yet do maintain work LAMP.

    The world is not black and white bw. You lose the arguement against FOSS very quickly bw as soon as you attempt to say there are such things as FOSS developers and Such thing as closed source developers. The majority are both.

    Right bw explain ASP.Net released by Microsoft as open source. The same developers who work on MS .net AOT/JIT core made that. Yes that AOT/JIT is closed source.

    Yes some Microsoft developers are duel personality. Commitment has nothing todo if a project is closed or open as well bw.

    Commitment is about profit. If I have signed a Service Level Agreement(SLA) with you I have more on the line than selling you a software license bw. Support providers in fact have a higher level of commitment with more risk for failing to meet the commitment.

    Yes MS EULA removes Microsoft from the fall out from damages due to product failure. Someone with a signed SLA is up for damages if solution fails.

    So FOSS projects that you can buy SLA’s for (this includes Libreoffice) there developers are more committed legally than buying from Microsoft.

    Yes if you go FOSS and are willing to pay some money things can be way better than going Microsoft on the support and speed of fixing of issues. Reason SLA failures will cost the party who has a SLA with you to cover your losses.

    The reality is there is money to be made around FOSS. Some is the required bribing to get your alterations upstream quickly. Some is the SLA. Some is selling third party solutions that depend on the FOSS code somewhere that just might be a closed source solution for everything bar the FOSS bits.

  22. bw wrote, of developers contributing to LibreOffice, “Where is the evidence for that? I would rather say that it is a cooperative product of a number of individuals who are working on it for the fun of it all. In some cases they are being paid for their time by companies who are making a profit in some way or another from supplying some equipment or service that requires that some sort of plausible offer can be made that customers might rely on.”

    See? contributors from all over the world. Many are from folks who produce/distribute GNU/Linux and want a good office suite and many are from organizations that use LibreOffice and want it to thrive. Many are volunteers. No doubt they do so for personal reasons and they may well be users. LibreOffice works for everyone.

    e.g. Aentos is a web-development company in the Canary Islands.

    ALTA is an association promoting FLOSS in Brazil.

    Intel is a well-known US corporation.

    Lanedo is a FLOSS consultant who contributes so that “By hiring competent developers directly from the communities we engage ourselves in, Lanedo is one of the few companies that can evaluate and guarantee optimum interaction with Free Software and Open Source projects.”

    The City of Munich is a heavy user of GNU/Linux and they are switching to LibreOffice and contributing to the project.

    The French National police use it and their prime minister, “Ayrault wants different branches of the French administration to use the same free software as one another when possible, so as to share experience and cut support costs. Until now, each ministry or agency has been left to pursue its own strategy.
    He also wants them to reinvest between 5 percent and 10 percent of the money they save through not paying for proprietary software licenses, spending it instead on contributing to the development of the free software.”
    So, I would not be surprised to find someone from that organization on the list of contributors.

  23. bw says:

    It’s a cooperative product of the world

    Where is the evidence for that? I would rather say that it is a cooperative product of a number of individuals who are working on it for the fun of it all. In some cases they are being paid for their time by companies who are making a profit in some way or another from supplying some equipment or service that requires that some sort of plausible offer can be made that customers might rely on.

    In other cases they are simply wannabe developer moths drawn to the flame of some high profile project of which there are only a handful – Linux itself, the rest of the LAMP quadrangle, Firefox, Open and Libre Office, and possibly a few others that might qualify. Otherwise it is either very tight knit groups of users with a tech bent who do trade code among themselves or one-off developers on a vanity fair sort of mission.

    In terms a breakfast food analogy, the FLOSS developers are like the eggs in a ham and egg serving. They are involved and interested, certainly, but the commercial company is like the ham, i.e., they are committed.

  24. dougman says:

    Robert beat me to the follow-up, but another thing I was going to say with the distractors to Libreoffice, is how they say it is somehow slow for them.

    When called out in a meeting, and asked in what way, the response will be something along the lines of “When I use Libreoffice, it is slow.”

    I ask what is their typing speed normally is and they say something like 20-80 WPM.

    Ok, lets take a timed test with the CIO standing behind you and see what happens. Needless to say, the typing speed is the same, so their argument is illogical.

    The two things I like with Libreoffice, is one: PDF creation is baked in, two: one can export to Mediawiki formatting very easily.

  25. bw wrote, ” Being paid to work on the product by someone who is not responsible for it is not a very reliable way to accomplish progress or work to a schedule.”

    Some people still don’t get FLOSS. It’s not a product of a single company or ogranization. It’s a cooperative product of the world. That’s what the FLOSS licences do. FLOSS is flexible and is reliable despite any lack of schedules. It’s released when ready. That minimizes bugs/problems/complaints. FLOSS is the right way to do IT.

    Conversely, Longhorn/Vista was a product of a single organization and it was over budget of time and money and manpower and it was crappy. I had normal people use it for a few minutes and they were aghast. Opted for GNU/Linux in a heartbeat.

  26. bw says:

    Most of them are actually paid for their work.

    Not by LibreOffice. Being paid to work on the product by someone who is not responsible for it is not a very reliable way to accomplish progress or work to a schedule.

  27. oiaohm says:

    bw likes skipping over the fact that over 80 percent of Libreoffice developers are not Volunteers but are in fact people paid to work on it.

    Bw is just such a idiot with these claims. Libreoffice developers are fairly much just as company as the ones working on MS Office.

  28. bw wrote, “That adds up to about 12 euros per workstation, which isn’t a very large sum. In exchange for that sale, Valencia is now having to hope that however many there are developers for Libre Office will continue to be willing to work for free and diligently keep the package useable for governments like Valencia.”

    Chuckle. Check out the list of developers of LibreOffice:“Berlin & Barcelona, November 7, 2012 – The Document Foundation announces the first group of LibreOffice Certified Developers, who are recognized for their ability to hack LibreOffice code to develop new features or provide L3 support to enterprise users. They are: Bjoern Michaelsen (Canonical), Caolan McNamara (RedHat), Cedric Bosdonnat (SUSE), Christian Lohmaier (Volunteer), David Tardon (RedHat), Eike Rathke (RedHat), Eilidh McAdam (Lanedo), Fridrich Strba (SUSE), Jan Holesovsky (SUSE), Kohei Yoshida (SUSE), Lionel Elie Mamane (Volunteer), Lubos Lunak (SUSE), Markus Mohrhard (Volunteer), Michael Meeks (SUSE), Michael Stahl (RedHat), Petr Mladek (SUSE), Rene Engelhard (Volunteer), Stephan Bergmann (RedHat), Thorsten Behrens (SUSE), Timár András (SUSE) and Tor Lillqvist (SUSE).”

    See? Most of them are actually paid for their work. There are hundreds of contributors to LibreOffice and every month new ones appear. The “credits” list over 1K developers with 1 or more commits. The user-base is sufficiently large now that even if a few organizations contribute code/fixes the package will thrive.

  29. dougman says:

    Troll, states that he does not trust software developers as they are passionate about their work, rathers you spend $200+ in Office software from M$.

    If anyone is concerned over long-term access to their documents, then M$ Office is not the answer, as they will edit the registry to block you from opening older file formats at a whims notice, so as to perpetuate their business cycle and squeeze more money from the ignorant.

  30. bw says:

    From the cite:

    “the office suite is installed on all of the 120,000 desktop PCs of the administration, including schools and courts. The migration will save the government some 1.5 million euro per year on proprietary software licences.”

    That adds up to about 12 euros per workstation, which isn’t a very large sum. In exchange for that sale, Valencia is now having to hope that however many there are developers for Libre Office will continue to be willing to work for free and diligently keep the package useable for governments like Valencia. It is hard to put your organizations fate into the hands of volunteers like that, I think. I wouldn’t do it, not for 12 euros anyway.

    The life of a free loader is fraught with peril, I imagine.

  31. dougman says:

    I read that the cost ended being like $12/user. I always wondering why people want to spend money, when there are less costly alternatives.

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