Small, Cheap, Nearly Perfect Home Server

These days homes may have many client computers. There is a need for small cheap home servers for backup, file-serving, collaboration, etc.
“If you’ve got several different computers in need of a consistent and automated backup strategy, the RPi can do that. If you have music and video you’d like to be able to access from almost any screen in the house, the RPi can make that happen too. Maybe you have a printer or two you’d like to share with everyone easily? The Raspberry Pi can fill all those needs with a minimal investment in hardware and time.”

see Raspberry Pi: the Perfect Home Server.

This thing’s so small and cheap it pays for itself in a year just on the power-savings compared to using a legacy PC to do the job. How is it imperfect? Hmmm… If the clientele were a bunch of legacy PCs, you could probably accomplish the same thing by having at least one available 24×7. You could script a virtual server to do the job when any machine is up. If they are all down, then you don’t need a server except to synch with the outside world. So, a backup system could be made from a distributed file-system on a cluster and file-serving could be made from a distributed file-system etc., but then one would be wasting storage rather than electrical power and space. So, it’s nearly perfect… 😉

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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6 Responses to Small, Cheap, Nearly Perfect Home Server

  1. bw says:

    not as useful as a server

    I would bet that those who actually need a server at home are an order of magnitude less than those who use Linux, namely 0.1% or less. Why would you need a server?

    Certainly shared network storage suffices for photos, videos, MP3s, and the like. Even if you are using databases, a local copy of SQL Server Express is enough for your needs.

  2. bw wrote, “I got a 2TB Seagate network storage unit at Costco almost a year ago for $139 with a coupon from Seagate that they were handing out in the store.”

    That’s fine and useful but not as useful as a server which can do interactive stuff, run databases and search engines. Such a device in a home could be very useful for collaboration, and actually finding stuff that is stored there. After ~100K files or so, simple file storage is weak. One could put a search engine on each client but that is clearly wasteful. Price/performance matters.

  3. bw says:

    Just from the point that you ‘suspect’ that the PI uses Linux, proves that point that you do NOT know what you’re talking about

    lol. If/when you complete your GED, you may be able to read and see that my comment about what might be under the hood was in reference to the Seagate NAS unit. Also, the USB reference was clearly in reference to a printer connected to the NAS to share the network connection.

  4. dougman says:

    Re: the Pi is a gimmick that you have to search for on the internet and is not really a commercial product, just a curiosity for geeks.

    Worthless troll, I fail to see your point and your reasoning for even posting such drivel. if the PI bothers you, then don’t read about or better yet go play some bridge.

    Just from the point that you ‘suspect’ that the PI uses Linux, proves that point that you do NOT know what you’re talking about.

    Its not hard to drop a terminal and type “rsync -zvr /home your_destination”, but this example gives someone the opportunity to learn about computers and THAT is the point of the PI.

    Also, regarding USB drives, I recommend Western Digital over Seagate, but thats my preference. They have good customer service and you can talk to the tech support anytime.

    BTW, NEWEGG or Amazon is cheaper than Costco.

  5. bw says:

    Why would anyone want such a kludge bag of parts in their house? I got a 2TB Seagate network storage unit at Costco almost a year ago for $139 with a coupon from Seagate that they were handing out in the store. It plugs onto the home network at the cable modem and it is visible to any PC, wired or wireless, on the network. It has a USB port for a printer, too.

    Before you go off on a hoot, I suspect that whatever is inside it probably uses Linux modules to get the job done. The point, though, is that this appliance is made for regular people and is widely available in stores whereas the Pi is a gimmick that you have to search for on the internet and is not really a commercial product, just a curiosity for geeks.

  6. dougman says:

    It amazes me still to this day, on how many MS-centric people laughed at the Raspberry Pi when it first came out. Such types are so brain-dead to think that you need i5 or i7 CPUs to do anything with IT these days, but fail to realize that due to M$ bloat, that is what is needed these days.

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