M$ Is The Biggest Vulnerability In All IT

“What country or non U.S. based big business would feel comfortable with binaries from Oracle or Microsoft running on their iron. Who would want to trust their data to Amazon’s or Google’s clouds when the U.S. has already shown they don’t give a frack, they’ll have a subpoena rubber stamped in secret and take whatever info they deem they need, all in the name of the god of national security.”

see Welcome to Microsoft Trustworthy Computing.

Cool, eh? In its attempts at world domination, M$ destroyed its own house of cards. Having no foundation and no glue holding things together results in catastrophe. In addition to harming national security, ruining the brand, dragging down the economy of USA and stifling competition, M$ has now created a fertile summer-fallow for GNU/Linux, Android/Linux, etc. “Anything but M$” will soon be the byword for IT at the same time that demand for all kinds of IT is huge.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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13 Responses to M$ Is The Biggest Vulnerability In All IT

  1. bw says:

    Hold on a minute

    The issue was using Windows in their business operations. Whatshisname alleged that these companies had gone out of business, presumably due to some drawback to using Windows. The point is that these companies continue to use Windows and are still very much in business. The Ford reference is rather odd, too, since their Sync is based on Microsoft Windows Phone and even has the MS logo on the console. The “open source” element is disclosure of the interfaces so that various devices can connect and integrate with the Sync controller. Hopefully Sansa will take advantage of this and I can use it instead of my old Zune.

  2. matchrocket says:

    bw never gets tired of getting his ass kicked.

  3. bw wrote, “Companies using Windows throughout their organizations that I am directly familiar with are Lockheed-Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, Harris, Ford, General Motors, Toyota”

    Hold on a minute. Toyota is a Gold member of the Linux Foundation… Boeing uses GNU/Linux in their planes… Lockheed hires this kind of person:
    “This Systems Administrator will provide system administration services in support of HPCMP for a diverse mix of Linux Server and Workstation platforms. Troubleshoot and repair user problems on Linux systems. Install and update application and system software. Configure new systems for deployment, and prepare decommissioned systems for disposal. Apply security patches according to IAVAs (Information Assurance Vulnerability Alerts) and monitor systems for security breaches.
    Basic Qualifications Red Hat”

    Same goes for Northrop

    Ford moved to GNU/Linux back in 2003 and is still going strong.

    and Harris

    GM, a competitor to Ford uses a lot of GNU/Linux too.

    So, bw is way off the trail again.

  4. bw says:

    Why don’t you just admit to gross exaggeration, ram? Companies using Windows throughout their organizations that I am directly familiar with are Lockheed-Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, Harris, Ford, General Motors, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Sony, General Electric, John Deere, and Caterpillar. Those are just the big ones where I have been on sales calls or similar and all in the USA.

  5. ram says:

    Turn the question around. What significant private companies still exist that use Microsoft?

  6. bw says:

    Oh, ram, you are so conspiratorial! But you are silent about which of these “private” companies came to a sad end over using Microsoft products in their IT organizations. Have you lost your notes?

  7. ram says:

    The next biggest vulnerability, behind Microsoft, is UEFI, which is SO BIG, and SO SECRET, that you know it must have backdoors written in. In fact, you can bet your company or country on it 😉

  8. bw says:

    Any genuinely private (as opposed to state owned or controlled) company I know that made the mistake of using Microsoft products went down in short order

    Given the near to 100% common characteristic of companies use of Microsoft Windows in their IT structures, that is rather hard to believe. Do you have any examples to show? Or do you have some sort of conspiracy agenda that depends on the “genuinely” qualifier?

  9. ram says:

    Any genuinly private (as opposed to state owned or controlled) company I know that made the mistake of using Microsoft products went down in short order. The demise of American manufacturing is in no small part due to them not securing their IT systems.
    In high tech sectors the situation is even more apparent.

  10. bw says:

    I was expecting the link to point to some story that your imagination stretched to mean that Microsoft had destroyed its own “house of cards”. Instead I got a definition that still seems to me to be redundant. That got me to wondering about things like “dial a phone” that have long gone away just as people do not build constructions out of playing cards anymore. Their parents buy them a big Lego set instead. No more string and thread spool spinners either. 🙁

  11. bw wrote, “You don’t really think that you need to reference “house of cards” or do you?”

    I don’t presume the term is global or even that playing cards are a common concept. This blog gets visitors from everywhere.

  12. oiaohm says:

    bw really you need to think carefully. Lot of system breaches come from the PRC.

    Something that you have to seriously consider is the hidden source code helping or really making matter worse.

    It is a very hard problem. Hidden source code is only security by obscurity if the person attacking you don’t have it as well.

    In fact hidden source code that your attacker has but you are not allowed to access now places you at a disadvantage defending a system.

  13. bw says:

    You don’t really think that you need to reference “house of cards” or do you? Do you fear that doughman has not paid the excessive fees for enough education to have mastered that concept?

    Snotty remarks aside, though, I remember reading somewhere that Microsoft has given various governments access to source code for the products that they have purchased and use in their operations, specifically the PRC. I know that my own company has the source in the form of checked builds of released and pending versions of Windows servers so that we can debug our own product in conjunction with the OS.

    Certainly data that is so sensitive that it cannot be trusted to anyone is something that requires special handling, but anything not so volatile, which describes, I am sure, 99.99999% of what you might have on hand, can be relegated to efficient storage mechanisms in clouds or someone else’s servers of similar functionality.

    All you can get out of this is that the author of the piece likely has some history that they are deeply ashamed of and fearful that it will be found out. I wonder what it is.

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