GNU/Linux in Developing Countries

Amen to Dagorret who wrote, “An average Indian does not have enough financial capacity to afford a new computer every one-and-half years. And why should we do that? Computers should serve us, we shouldn’t serve them! Computers are for working, and changing them every one or two years also destabilizes the working environment.”
see Linux in undeveloped countries

Most of the characteristics of GNU/Linux he describes as suitable for use in India are applicable everywhere for some of us. I spent years in Canada’s North in schools that certainly benefited by using GNU/Linux. We didn’t have the time, money or resources to prop up Wintel. Even buying a new PC sometimes cost $200 just for the freight. All the more need to keep PCs working until they died, something we could not do with Wintel because of malware.

I recommend Debian GNU/Linux for everything because it works.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to GNU/Linux in Developing Countries

  1. crni says:

    try doing some video editing or photo montage, not to mention playing games, if you think that people don’t need more computing power….

  2. Mats Hagglund says:

    The cycle of desktop is nowadays likely about 10 years – if you use Linux and i won’t be surprised at all if i saw desktops bought in 2005 and still working fine in let’s say year 2018.

  3. ram says:

    No doubt about it, power consumption, size, and weight have come down alot for the same level of computing power. The Intel Atom chips (used by Shuttle, for example, for book sized devices) give quite reasonable performance, draw only a few Watts, and make no noise with no fans. Semi-serious grunt can be had from the Intel NUC boxen. I look forward to their NUC i7 offering being released.

  4. George Hostler says:

    ram: The days of computing power doubling every 18 months is over, likewise the “need” to replace computers every two or three years to stay “efficient” is a doubtful premise these days.

    My “tablet device” is an older ASUS 701 4G Surf netbook running Zorin 6.2 Lite, a Ubuntu based LXDE GUI system made light on resources. It runs fin in its 512 MB RAM and 4GB SSDD. To ferry data, I normally use SD cards. It has all I need including a keyboard for mobility.

    It also suffices as my “MP3 Player”, connected to my Behringer 180 Watt instrument amp to play backing tracks for my sax playing.

    It is compact enough to fit in an overnight travel bag or motorcycle saddle bag, has wifi and a browser for Internet connectivity at cafes and restaurants. I use it to browse the Internet, read and write E-mails, even compose documents while on travel.

    For this usage, I definitely don’t need anything more. It’s lightweight Intel mobile processor is more than sufficient for the tasks at hand.

  5. oiaohm says:

    ram 2 to 3 years in future to replace computer to get power effective might be possible.

    With arm and other items better power effectiveness.

  6. ram wrote, “The days of computing power doubling every 18 months is over, likewise the “need” to replace computers every two or three years to stay “efficient” is a doubtful premise these days.”

    Yes. My Beast is more than a few years old now and it idles mostly unless I build a new kernel.
    %Cpu0 : 2.7 us, 0.7 sy, 0.0 ni, 96.6 id, 0.0 wa, 0.0 hi, 0.0 si, 0.0 st
    %Cpu1 : 4.0 us, 1.0 sy, 0.0 ni, 94.3 id, 0.7 wa, 0.0 hi, 0.0 si, 0.0 st
    %Cpu2 : 2.0 us, 0.7 sy, 0.0 ni, 97.3 id, 0.0 wa, 0.0 hi, 0.0 si, 0.0 st
    %Cpu3 : 4.0 us, 1.3 sy, 0.0 ni, 94.7 id, 0.0 wa, 0.0 hi, 0.0 si, 0.0 st

    Beast has 4 cores and they all idle as I do my blogging. Beast is 5 years old.

  7. ram says:

    The fact is, since the first AMD-64 chips, from almost ten years ago now, the per core computing power has not increased much. Here and there some aspects, and of course, more cores per chip.

    Trouble is, most applications, and certainly legacy applications, can’t really use the extra cores and threads. The days of computing power doubling every 18 months is over, likewise the “need” to replace computers every two or three years to stay “efficient” is a doubtful premise these days.

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