HP And Operating Systems

CEO Whitman, on PCs: “Let me say a bit more about our strategy in this business, using multiple operating systems, multiple architectures and multiple form factors, we are moving quickly to produce the devices that customers want, and in this battle for customers, our supply chain and distribution network gives us a key advantage. You will also see us focus on services, peripherals and accessories to increase the revenue potential of our devices.”
see Hewlett-Packard Co HPQ Q2 2013 Earnings Call Transcript

That sounds like the end of Wintel as a monopoly, must-have, essential platform.

Further: “Following the launch of our first Chromebook in February, we launched the new Slate 7 in the second quarter. The Slate marries a sleek 7-inch form factor with ARM chip and an Android platform to deliver a compelling mobile device at $169. Early signs of interest in this product are encouraging, and just last week, we introduced the HP SlateBook x2, the first Android hybrid device with the Nvidia Tegra 4 mobile processor. The SlateBook x2 provides users with more realistic gaming, faster web browsing and smoother HD video playback.

Overall, our turnaround made progress in the second quarter and as we look out at the enormous shifts that are occurring across the technology landscape, I believe HP is positioned well to deliver solutions for the new style of IT and lead in critical markets. Converged infrastructure built-on technologies like converged storage, software-defined networking and Moonshot will form the backbone of tomorrow’s cloud and this backbone will be integrated with big data and security capabilities that will allow seamless connection across the virtual and physical worlds.”

Little by little, OEMs are coming to the realization that if they don’t sell FLOSS, someone else will do it. Being an M$-only OEM is no longer good business.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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10 Responses to HP And Operating Systems

  1. George Hostler says:

    Robert Pogson: That was the top salesman at M$ discussing forcing people to buy new PCs by slowing them down… Guess what happened? PCs running that other OS did slow down and people felt it necessary to replace PCs every 3 years even though the hardware was as fast as ever.

    Robert, when I talked to my co-workers, I found few have a love for their Windows operating systems. One, a senior told me that when he read of the various indictments and anti-competitive maneuvers by Microsoft, he lost all respect for the company. Regarding a dislike for Microsoft, he is not alone.

    Earlier this year, this CNET writer brings up interesting dialogue:

    Do you hate Microsoft?

    What sparked the sudden fit of self-examination? All signs point to Windows 8. After some poking and prodding, I concluded that it’s fine for tablets, but ridiculous as a desktop operating system. It forces users to jump through incessant hoops and relearn the most basic tasks, all for no good reason. To use the tired-but-apt car analogy, it’s like Microsoft relocated the door handle, steering wheel, and trunk, then told customers, “But look at the beautiful paint job!”

    He further continues:

    Right now, today, on my primary system, there are two Windows updates that won’t install for love nor money, even though Windows appears to install them (for a good 10 minutes) every time I shut down.

    And you know how you’re supposed to get a list of recent documents when you right-click a Microsoft Office icon in the taskbar? Yeah, I don’t get that list. It appears for other apps, just not for Microsoft’s own office suite. Oh, and if I try to install a network printer, the whole Add Printer dialog just locks up.

    Annoyances like these are par for the course with Windows — but they shouldn’t be. It’s 2013, not 1995.

    Then he mentions another peeve:

    As I mentioned earlier, my dislike has roots in the past, not just the present. I’m still bitter about the way Microsoft strong-armed the atrocious Windows Mobile (nee Pocket PC) operating system into the PDA market, eventually defeating the much-superior Palm OS. Later came the idiotic Kin smartphones, which Microsoft put out to pasture after just two months (!) and $1 billion in development.

    It just seems like everything Microsoft does is mediocre. Passable. But also curiously expensive.

    There is more to read, but I’ll let those who desire to read it themselves. There are less happy campers out there than some would like to admit, for example this recent Computerworld article:

    Europe to Microsoft: We hate Windows 8

    PC sales in Western Europe plummeted in the first quarter in the biggest decline the continent has ever seen — more than 20 percent. And one key reason for the drop is that European users simply don’t like Windows 8.

    One of the concluding statements was:

    In that, European users are no different than users anywhere else in the world. Last month, IDC reported that PC sales had their biggest worldwide drop ever in the first quarter, 13.9 percent.

    That IDC report had this to say:

    “At this point, unfortunately, it seems clear that the Windows 8 launch not only failed to provide a positive boost to the PC market, but appears to have slowed the market,” said Bob O’Donnell, IDC Program Vice President, Clients and Displays. “While some consumers appreciate the new form factors and touch capabilities of Windows 8, the radical changes to the UI, removal of the familiar Start button, and the costs associated with touch have made PCs a less attractive alternative to dedicated tablets and other competitive devices.”

    This helps to account for the greater Android and Apple tablets, intelligent phone and device sales. My son showed me his tablet, and it does everything he needs to browse the Internet, check up on work, make printouts and receive scans from his wireless all-in-one, and even play games. For he and his wife, it has replaced their desktops.

    As for my “tablet”, I’m using an older ASUS 701, 4G Surf Netbook with Zorin 6.2 Lite Linux, a Ubuntu based distro with LXDE GUI. It runs easily in 4 Gigabytes of solid state disk storage, is fine for connecting to cafe wifi’s, browse the ‘net, compose documents, and etc. I have backing tracks loaded on it so I can practice jazz with my saxes. It’s A-D converter is good enough that playing these tracks via Ardour patched to my Bahringer 180 Watt instrument amplifier sounds like a live band with sufficient volume for my play.

    It has given me a trouble free experience, I don’t miss Windows.

  2. Carly Talley says:

    The HP Slatebook x2 runs an almost pure version of Android Jelly Bean 4.2.2, no fancy proprietary UI stuff, which many people are fond of. Other than few extra apps for utilities there is not much bloatware either. The SlateBook is expected to launch this summer at $480 for 64GB.

  3. Mats Hagglund says:

    The adopting of Windows 8 has been some 28-30 million/quarter of year. During the Q1 2013 27.8 million Android-tablets were sold (source: IDC). It’s more and more likely that in March 2013 Android-tablets were passing by Windows 8-adopting. And those Win 8-figures are not just real Windows 8- licenses but all, including pirates.

    So once again here’s the main story:

    Android smartphones + tablets = 162½ million + 27.8 million = 190.3 million (IDC, Digitimes, Gartner)

    Windows 8 + Windows tablets + Windows Phoney = 28 (or 30) million + 1.8 million + 6.8 = ~ 37-39 million Windows devices

    Babe, it’s about 5:1 rate between Android Linux versus Windows 8/Window RT/Windows Phoney. Even if all non-Mac/non-ChromeBook were installed with Windows (7/XP or whatever) there still be rate of 190:77 ~ 2.5:1 between Android Linux vs. all Windows devices.

    Now we can be sure that over 55% of new devices (smartphone, tablet, portable, desktop) are using Linux-kernel.

  4. oiaohm says:

    ch out to about 8 years old is roughly the same performance as low end entry today. This is part of the problem. Computer power is in excess of what users need

  5. ch says:

    For the sake of completeness: After creating the basic video with PP, I loaded it into Movie Maker, added a music sountrack and saved the result – several iterations until everything (especially timing) was just so. Interestingly, MM offers the following options for your final result:
    – Upload to Facebook, YouTube, vimeo or flickr
    – Save for viewing on PC, Android phone, iPhone, Windows Phone, Zune or Android / iPad / Windows tablet.

    Once again, loading and saving the 7-minute video took a while (so maybe I really have to buy that new macine? *g*) – and no, I don’t expect an Academy Award for it 🙁

    All programs mentioned are just examples – sure you could do it with other software, too, it’s just what I actually used.

  6. ch says:

    “until we find true MIPS eating applicaiton”

    Clearly this guy is Brainstorming – meaning he only poses a threat to the sanity of those around him – but he obviously has a point: Current PC hardware is rather ahead of current software. So imagine you were a software developer: How would you react?
    a) Let’s be frugal with those computing resources, we don’t want to build bloatware.
    b) Whoopie! Let’s waste all those resources!
    c) Can we do something useful with all this power at our disposal?
    Since a) would be silly and b) would be ridiculously silly, MS went with c) and came up with some nice things: In Word (and about the same time, any other word processor on the market, I believe), we first got printing in the background, then real-time spell-checking, grammar checking etc. – would have been hard on a 1980’s PC.

    Recently, I did a small presentation (yes, PowerPoint) on J. M. W. Turner and his time (quick challenge: find the link to “Frankenstein” 😉 and showed it to a friend who suggested I might turn it into a video. How to do that? Then I found that in PP you can simply “save as” video – nice! However, that took my five-year-old PC a few minutes of hard work – lots of MIPSes burned. You probably wouldn’t want to do that on a really old PC, but so what?
    (I might even use that as an excuse to buy that new, fire-breathing machine I have been contemplating for a while now – yippie!) So that’s something that is actually useful AND burns quite some MIPSes – should MS not have done that function because it would be hard on old hardware?

    Class, please sing with me:

    ‘Puters don’t fear the MIPSes
    Nor do the wind, the sun or the rain
    (we can be like they are)
    Come on baby (don’t fear the MIPSes)

  7. ram says:

    Although it made alot of fine enthusiast machines and servers available at very low cost to Linux users. Plus, with Linux, if you don’t think you have enough computing “grunt” you can cluster them.

    Pity about the UEFI thing. Most of the Microsoft 8 motherboards are just going to be scrapped and take up landfill space — unless someone starts selling aftermarket non-UEFI replacement BIOS chips. Hopefully the UEFI chip is socketed, desoldering and putting in a new chip on modern multilayer boards is probably noneconomic.

  8. bw wrote, “You are being paranoid, seeing a boogey man behind every gravestone! HP and Dell and others have frequently taken fliers into product areas outside of Wintel computers. None of the Linux trial baloons have lasted long.”

    It’s not paranoia if M$ is out to get us and they are. In their own words:
    “current PC technology is totally sufficient for most office tasks and consumer desires and that any performance bottleneck is not in today’s PCs but in today’s COM pipes. This in itself might slow down replacement cycles and life time shortening until we find true MIPS eating applicaiton- a priority not only INTEL should subscribe to.”
    That was the top salesman at M$ discussing forcing people to buy new PCs by slowing them down… Guess what happened? PCs running that other OS did slow down and people felt it necessary to replace PCs every 3 years even though the hardware was as fast as ever. Trolls on this site were defending that practice last year. That’s a horrible crime to foist on Earth for more than a decade.

  9. bw says:

    “It basically took a company sufficiently large enough to afford a legal team to basically say NO to Microsoft and make it stick”

    No need to get a lawyer to sell a chromebook or an android tablet. You are being paranoid, seeing a boogey man behind every gravestone! HP and Dell and others have frequently taken fliers into product areas outside of Wintel computers. None of the Linux trial baloons have lasted long. HP has a checkered history of tablet production, too, that isn’t likely to be improved by thowing in a keyboard.

  10. George Hostler says:

    Robert Pogson wrote:

    Little by little, OEMs are coming to the realization that if they don’t sell FLOSS, someone else will do it. Being an M$-only OEM is no longer good business.

    Speaking of good business, I am glad that there is now another choice on notebooks and tablets, that being Google’s Chrome along with Android for cell phones and tablets.

    It basically took a company sufficiently large enough to afford a legal team to basically say NO to Microsoft and make it stick.

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