XP Users: No, M$, You Can’t Buy Our Love With $84

Robbers aren’t loved if they offer to steal less from victims…
“SMBs still stuck on XP and Office 2003 can get a 15 percent discount for Windows 8 Pro and Office 2013 purchases, reports Computerworld.
Since Microsoft’s Open License website lists Windows 8 Pro and Office 2013 for a total of $561, the 15 percent discount translates to about $84. It might not sound like much, but it helps, especially if SMBs are in the market for multiple licences.”

see Microsoft offers limited discount for XP users – Up to 15 percent

SMBs, you can get Debian GNU/Linux and LibreOffice for $0 per unit, you can make unlimited copies, you can make unlimited upgrades, and you don’t need to upgrade your hardware unless you want to do that. You also get Freedom instead of slavery when you make those choices.

Reminder: XP’s EULA states, “Installation and Use. Except as otherwise expressly provided in this EULA, you may install, use, access, display and run only one (1) copy of the SOFTWARE on the COMPUTER. The SOFTWARE may not be used by more than two (2) processors at any one time on the COMPUTER, unless a higher number is indicated on the Certificate of Authenticity. You may permit a maximum of ten (10) (“Connection Maximum”) computers or other electronic devices (each a “Device”) to connect to the COMPUTER to utilize one or more of the following services of the SOFTWARE: File services, Print services, Internet Information services, and remote access (including connection sharing and telephony services). The ten (10) Connection Maximum includes any indirect connections made through “multiplexing” or other software or hardware which pools or aggregates connections. Except as otherwise permitted herein, you may not use the Device to use, access, display or run the SOFTWARE, the SOFTWARE’s User Interface or other executable software residing on the COMPUTER. This ten connection maximum does not apply to any other uses of the Product.”

HEHEHE. You can also cut down on the number of lawyers you need to hire with the FLOSS licences of GNU/Linux.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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12 Responses to XP Users: No, M$, You Can’t Buy Our Love With $84

  1. bw wrote, “I cannot believe that school system, even one in the boondocks, would not have some method of keeping an accurate inventory of their capital equipment.”

    Imagine a building with 300 kids, 24 teachers, one secretary and one principal. The inventory could get done but who would keep track of it and check it against the next one? Who would have read the EULA to know what has to be done with it? It’s just easier to ignore the problem. I’ve come to schools where nothing was done about IT for a year or more, typically junking old machines and replacing a few others. The last school I attended had 300 students and 20 PCs in working (?) order in classrooms. There were installation CDs all over the place and no indication how many PCs were installed of each. There was no list of serial numbers or authentication codes, nothing. The office would not even bother to search for documents from the acquisitions… When I left there was a database with all the information I had but I installed GNU/Linux so none of that would be needed. The system admin could check his inventory with “ping”. I even saved the MACs for DHCP/DNS. With automation it can be done fairly easily but no one knew how or wanted to invest the time to figure it out. I think I was the first person in the building to have read the EULA.

  2. bw says:

    “It’s a lot less than the cost of installing that other OS: re-re-reboots, authentication codes, record-keeping, audits, etc. ”

    Nothing but a tired old collection of straw men. Computers come with Windows pretty much unless you are an individual building one from parts or a big company ordering blank computers to use with volume licenses for Windows. You create hypothetical cases of innocents who somehow manage to mess up their chain of custody of licenses and then are stomped on by the BSA. But there are no real life cases on record of that happening. You always trot out the Ernie Ball guitar case, but that was a case where the fellow did not have licenses for all installed software and admitted to it. He was hardly an innocent, just an unfortunate who didn’t think contracts and things applied to him. I bet he didn’t let any of his customers welch on paying for a shipment.

    As to the record-keeping, I cannot believe that school system, even one in the boondocks, would not have some method of keeping an accurate inventory of their capital equipment. If that is what was happening where you worked, they should have gotten rid of their administrators before doing anything else.

  3. kozmcrae says:

    bw wrote:

    “That offer pales in comparison to the Windows 8 Pro offer they made a few months ago for updating Windows 7 Home to 8 Pro for $40.”

    Even I have to admit that’s not bad. Microsoft paid him $40 to upgrade 3 Windows 7 computers to Windows 8.

  4. bw wrote, “The cost of getting Linux installed for almost everyone is nowhere near zero”.

    It’s a lot less than the cost of installing that other OS: re-re-reboots, authentication codes, record-keeping, audits, etc. With GNU/Linux, I can poll my LAN and have every machine report the relevant information, that they are up and running. That’s all I need. I don’t need to record some random gibberish M$ gave an OEM.

  5. bw says:

    “The only people I know who don’t pay…”

    That is not the measure of the cost, though. The cost is relative to any alternative. The cost of getting Linux installed for almost everyone is nowhere near zero, you have to hire someone to do it for you if you don’t know how, as you claimed here that “99 out of a 100” do not know how to do this in substantiating your monopoly claim.

    Maybe some people can find a benevolent sort such as yourself who will do the deed gratis. But gentlemen like you are hard to find and many would be reduced to paying the Geek Squad or similar to help out.

    Ditto for business. They have to install something and the volume license costs of Windows are rather small on any case by case basis when compared to the costs of changing institutional programs and practices over to a new system. Look at the Germans who have been struggling some 10 years now.

  6. bw wrote, “Licensing costs are, as I have pointed out, essentially zero.”, even though M$ brings in a few $billion every time the world cranks out 90million PCs, about $50 per machine. M$ is not on all of them so the per-unit price M$ is charging is somewhat higher than that.

    The only people I know who don’t pay M$ for licences are schools who can get PCs donated with M$’s gratis XP. Even then schools are burdened with the maintenance of authentication codes, stickers, phoning home and all the other baggage of TOS.

  7. bw says:

    •less licensing cost,
    •faster booting,
    •faster windowing,
    •fewer re-re-reboots, and
    •a lot less malware

    I wonder if we are living in the same world. Licensing costs are, as I have pointed out, essentially zero. My company buys Dells with no OS installed at all and images new computers with the company approved software before giving it to an employee to use and taking away their old one. All that is taken care of with volume licensing and it covers a ton of stuff including Windows 7 Enterprise, MS Office 2010, Adobe, and a bunch of private programs that we use for internal admin such as expense reports, meeting scheduling, collaboration documents, and any other thing that we use computers to effect. Only IE is allowed here.

    At home, I get Windows with the computer and they were all of various ages but all were Win 7 Home Premium until I updated to Win 8 Pro. I did pay $120 for the updates, but I think it was worth it, if only for the Pro functions. Even figuring in the updates, that is chicken feed in terms of money spent for Windows and would never compensate for the hassle needed to install Linux on a blank computer.

    The reboot issue doesn’t exist either. At the office as at home, everything is on 24/7 and, if it reboots, it is in the middle of the night and I only can tell when the next day the computer is sitting at the log in screen for a restart rather than the log in for a wake-up from the screen saver.

    As far back as I can remember, there was no problem with XP either, but that was more than 10 years ago in any case.

    Malware has never been a problem for me, but I am a docile user, perhaps, and do not go to these risqué sites. At the office we have something call SAV installed on all workstations and at home I use the free thing that comes from Microsoft. With the Win 8 update, I had to remove that and there is something now built into Win 8 apparently called “Defender” that, as near as I can see, puts the McAfee and Norton folk out of the business since it looks like Win 8 won’t allow third party antivirus programs. Maybe I am wrong here.

    Anyway, I am often reading about some virus that is infecting Android phones, so maybe Linux isn’t so wonderful after all. Maybe it has only been long ignored.

  8. AB wrote, “the media is not only beholden to M$ advertising money, they also tend to have softers working in their midst. They represent a barrier to be broken or circumvented.”

    That used to be true fairly widely. I recently found a reasonable site reporting news from Africa. When I mentioned GNU/Linux in a comment about an article describing training in the use of M$’s OS and applications, the comment was deleted… So, it still happens but there are many instances when news about FLOSS gets good coverage in the media. Too often, though, they report “open source” when they should write “free software”. Journalists in the media are usually not up to speed on the differences.

    e.g. Google shows just two pages of hits for “linux” on cbc.ca in the past year. In 2007, they show 5 pages of hits… CNN is much better showing 17 pages of hits for “linux” in the past year and 4 pages for 2007.

    So, it’s mixed.

  9. bw wrote, “I have tried a few of the programs mentioned here as great FOSS software and I found that they work just fine with Windows 8, too. I don’t think that these programs are going to convince anyone to try Linux.”

    Running LibreOffice and a FLOSS browser may not be reason to migrate to GNU/Linux but they sure do eliminate barriers. Folks have many other valid reasons to migrate to GNU/Linux:

    • less licensing cost,
    • faster booting,
    • faster windowing,
    • fewer re-re-reboots, and
    • a lot less malware.

    So, using the FLOSS applications on that other OS makes it easier to migrate to GNU/Linux for whatever reason the user has in mind. In my personal experience re-re-reboots was the single and sufficient reason to migrate. I did not use any FLOSS applications except FreePascal and Netscape when I migrated. After I migrated, I used FreePascal, Netscape and StarOffice which soon evolved to OpenOffice.org. All the other reasons to migrate including software freedom became evident to me years later, after I read US DOJ v M$. I just indexed all those exhibits on my desktop. I can read about M$ wanting MIPS-eating applications to sell more licences…

  10. bw says:

    That offer pales in comparison to the Windows 8 Pro offer they made a few months ago for updating Windows 7 Home to 8 Pro for $40. I update all three computers that I had at that price, my wife’s Dell all-in-one, my desktop, and my laptop. I got a 3 user license for Start Is Back from the Windows 8 app store for $3 which put the desktop mode back to almost identical with Windows 7, too. So it cost me $41 per computer.

    Windows 8 Pro allows for remote connections to each Windows computer from remote locations although I had to set it for different ports on my cable router to be able to select which computer to connect from a remote internet connection. I found out how to do that on Google.

    I am delighted with Windows 8, particularly since I can always go back to a Windows 7 sort of mode whenever I need it for things like Quicken or MS Office. Or LibreOffice as well. I have tried a few of the programs mentioned here as great FOSS software and I found that they work just fine with Windows 8, too. I don’t think that these programs are going to convince anyone to try Linux.

  11. Aieee a Ballhogg says:

    Everyone here knows of the superiority of GNU/Linux over XP. However, for those still stuck in XP, they are really stuck, partially from bad vendor lock-in, partially out of ignorance. The ignorance could be addressed a little if the mainstream press would even mention GNU/Linux. Even naming a distro would help. But the media is not only beholden to M$ advertising money, they also tend to have softers working in their midst. They represent a barrier to be broken or circumvented.

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