Chromebooks Are Number 1

Chromebooks_are_Number_1

This is a major part of the decline of Wintel in 2012/2013. The notebook category is stagnant yet Chromebooks are taking a huge share.
“Over the past few months, Chromebooks have become a part of everyday life for many people – a computer for the kitchen, for on the go, or for sharing with the family (or not). In the U.S., the Samsung Chromebook has been at the top of Amazon’s best-selling laptop list for 149 days since launch and in the U.K., Dixons says Chromebooks make up more than 10 percent of laptop sales in Currys and PC World stores.”

It shows once again, if there was ever any doubt, that people do shop based on price/performance and you can’t beat the performance of FLOSS on hardware that you own. The example of the Chromebook may well convince many OEMs and retailers that they are tying themselves to a dead weight when they “recommend” that other OS and ship M$’s OS on their PCs. The world is opening up to other possibilities like Android/Linux, ChromeOS and GNU/Linux. Free/Libre Open Source Software is a cooperative project of the world to create and share great software. Linux is the heart of these operating systems, managing resources so you can run multiple tasks for multiple users simultaneously and smoothly.

I recommend Debian GNU/Linux. It works for us, not M$. If you have a PC that’s sluggish and loaded with malware or won’t boot. Try installing GNU/Linux to set it free. It won’t cost you anything but a little time. If you don’t find GNU/Linux at your local retailer, demand to know why.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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10 Responses to Chromebooks Are Number 1

  1. oiaohm says:

    Robert Pogson Chromebooks us a different boot system.

    MS is locked out because Google and Chromebook makers does not make any key drivers for Windows at all for those devices. This avoids Microsoft accusing them of having those machines installed with illegal copies of Windows.

  2. Mats Hagglund wrote, “I won’t see much migration to Windows.”

    I wonder if the ChromeBooks have “secure boot”. Is M$ locking itself out?

  3. Mats Hagglund says:

    If 5% of 2013 portable computers were ChromeBooks it would mean something like 10 million Chrome-devices. It’s likely that most of them (probably huge majority) will stay only with Chrome OS. Hundreds of thousands will be re-installed with other Linux distributions (many of then beside ChromeOS). I won’t see much migration to Windows. You see, Windows is absolutely too heavy for these fine devices. Windows RT is just waste of time and money. Windows is losing the battleground.

  4. oiaohm says:

    http://wiki.debian.org/InstallingDebianOn/Samsung/ARMChromebook

    George Wilson EME does have one catch the supported codec is Webm. So at least the video codec will not be locked up by patents.

    George Wilson you can still follow Roberts instructions and install Debian on the Chrome-book and escape the google cloud.

    George Wilson Windows 8 with a on-line account is not much better than Chrome OS.
    http://www.howtogeek.com/121975/htg-explains-microsoft-accounts-vs.-local-accounts-in-windows-8/

    There is one advantage. The on-line Linux and the Off-line Linux systems do look different.

    George Wilson Windows 8 RT you only have the online option as well except you don’t have the option to remove Windows 8 RT and use a true off-line OS.

    So exactly why should Robert be yell at Google over it. Google is providing us with hardware we can pave over.

    A person who compares there choices is not like Stallman. You drop the things that are basically identical. Personal data landing in the cloud is identical between what Mirosoft and Google are doing. Google is making sure you have opt out. Hard complex annoying opt out but you still have it.

    Microsoft with Windows 8 RT showed their hand of providing no opt out bar not buying the device.

    The large volumes of chromebook sales still leaves the question what is happening to them after they leave stores. What percentage are getting paved over.

  5. Mats Hagglund says:

    Google give option too to you to install e.g Ubuntu to this nice cheap device:

    http://techfoobar.blogspot.fi/2013/01/how-to-install-ubuntu-on-samsungs-new.html

    “How to install Ubuntu on Samsungs new Chromebook (notebook 303C) “

  6. George Wilson says:

    Yes, that really sucks. So your champion Microsoft is going to save us all from that nasty DRM in HTML5, right…? They’re on our side, aren’t they…?

    Didn’t claim it. It only illustrates nicely the hypocrisy around here. Pogson has no problems letting users ship off their data to the great Google cloud where this data does effectively belong to Google. That’s the difference between an idealist like Stallman (whether one likes him or not) and a mere Microsoft hater like Pogson.

  7. kozmcrae says:

    George Wilson wrote:

    “And what’s Google up to these days? Embedding DRM in HTML5, for example?”

    Yes, that really sucks. So your champion Microsoft is going to save us all from that nasty DRM in HTML5, right…? They’re on our side, aren’t they…?

  8. oiaohm says:

    George Wilson the EME at the w3c is still evolving.

    George Wilson chromebooks all can have there firmware and OS replaced.

    So no they are not locking you into all your privacy belongs to us. They just make it inconvenient not to go that path.

  9. George Wilson says:

    Very good. Now you only need to purge all these other notebooks in the Top 100 running Windows and Mac OS X from your mind.

    It’s also deeply ironic that a notebook built specifically for locking users into Google’s “all your privacy belongs to us” model is powered by the free Linux.

    And what’s Google up to these days? Embedding DRM in HTML5, for example? No, you don’t say!

  10. kozmcrae says:

    Robert Pogson wrote:

    “The example of the Chromebook may well convince many OEMs and retailers that they are tying themselves to a dead weight when they “recommend” that other OS and ship M$’s OS on their PCs.”

    I believe the phrase used in the past to describe such a situation is “shackled to a corpse”.

    Maybe not a corpse yet but a body in seriously bad health. And contagious too.

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