DreamWorks Uses GNU/Linux For Workstations And Servers

“The Croods took more than 9,100 computing render-years to generate images from 3-D models. DreamWorks Animation uses Linux and HP for its animation workstations and servers.”
see DreamWorks Animation The Croods Tops 9,100 Linux Render-Years

You would think this would lay to rest the idea that one needs that other OS or a PC from Apple to create, but still I meet folks who swear GNU/Linux has no role for creative people…

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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41 Responses to DreamWorks Uses GNU/Linux For Workstations And Servers

  1. oiaohm says:

    bw in fact please know your products.
    http://www.quicken.com.au/businessfinance/
    Quicken is not just the home user item. In fact it does not exist any more as a home user item.

    In fact http://www.reckon.com.au/category.aspx?cid=2 this is the home stuff.
    Quicken as a home-product does not exist has not for over 18 months bw.

    Quicken suite that is the quickbooks business collection has. Last thing left using the Quicken title.

    http://www.reckon.com.au/default.aspx
    As as you can see in another few months that is not going to exist either.

    Please don’t attempt to take the high ground here I reasoned correctly for currently existing software.

    There are a stack of home finance software for Linux as well. Including closed source options.

    Yes you mentioned only an enterprise solution so I responded as enterprise.

    I guess you missed the complete reckon take over of intuit.

    bw
    “Have you not notice that while you hyenas were pull to bits, Windows server used increased to more than half of the business available? Campaign’s job is done.”
    In fact Microsoft stopped the using because the result was them sliding backwards in market share.

    The hyenas won bw. Removing the hyenas chew toy was a very good idea to reduce the on going damage.

    The problem with publishing those number CEO businesses started requesting there own internal TCO numbers.

    Getting CEO thinking about TCO studies is not a good thing for Microsoft bw.

  2. George Wilson says:

    The situation is similar at other companies I know in the media creation business. The big movie studies use staggering amounts of Linux boxen/servers. The smaller outfits, less – but still plenty.

    By God, we know that! What else is new?

    You seem incapable of understanding that there’s a world of difference between an artist being given a computer for work which has to fit into the pipeline at the studio in question and people buying computers for themselves.

    If a studio’s computer setup is based around Linux then they won’t give an artist a Windows PC or a Mac unless it’s for Photoshop or something.

    But if this artist buys for himself he’ll likely buy a Windows PC or a Mac. No problem there at all, especially since most studio software is cross-platform.

  3. bw says:

    ” Have you not notice the site is gone because they were pull to bits”

    Have you not notice that while you hyenas were pull to bits, Windows server used increased to more than half of the business available? Campaign’s job is done.

    “Quicken in a business brings you to a big question. Should they be using it.”

    Almost no one uses Quicken in a business. They use it at home for personal finance. That is why many people will reject Linux for home use, which is what I said.

    “The fact you can run it until it fairly much explodes and keep it on the latest version of the OS”

    Real people do not accept that argument. They do not care since they are going to use whatever came with the computer until its end of life. You dweebs want to constantly fiddle with computers, but most people, who are the ones doing most of the purchasing, do not want to do this and so being able to do it, true or not, does not matter to them.

  4. ram says:

    My company’s computers are nearly all Linux (exceptions are three legacy OS/2 machines and one OS-X machine). All the clusters are 100 percent Linux. We build the Linux cluster nodes ourselves, for our own use, and sometimes to sell to others. None of those would show up on IDC “statistics”. Very few of those machines are connected to the Internet. None of our clusters are.

    The situation is similar at other companies I know in the media creation business. The big movie studies use staggering amounts of Linux boxen/servers. The smaller outfits, less – but still plenty.

  5. oiaohm wrote, “The big thing Munich has reported is the fact they don’t have to replace the Linux machines as frequently.”

    Amen. That’s an interesting side-effect of their “slow-motion” migration. They got to see things change over time. I can vouch for the longevity. In schools the chief limitation on old machines was screen resolution. Almost all machines these days have more than 64MB RAM and 100/1000mbits/s NICs. The CPU speed is hardly relevant to production for a lot of uses. Around 10 years of age the current machines are cramped even for thin clients. Lots of folks have XP on 6-8 years old but if anything breaks they buy a new machine. So, GNU/Linux might not extend life double but a good 30% I would agree with.

    One of my “fun” things is doing an absolute minimal installation of Debian GNU/Linux. It will run in very small virtual machines, but the installer may actually require much more than the OS itself needs because the data tracking available packages and dependencies takes so much RAM… One can install on a much smaller machine with a local server presenting only the needed packages. The minimal machine boots like a rocket and it reminds one of the huge bloat many software systems have these days. Starting from a minimal system helps me set up machines with nothing except essential software for particular tasks. That certainly improves performance for the user. Asking a machine to do less is a useful cure for bloat. Browsers are the biggest stressor most users apply to a PC these days. I think most browsers assume a ton of RAM is available to accelerate operations.

  6. oiaohm says:

    bw yes Microsoft published a huge batch of advertising class compares. Have you not notice the site is gone because they were pull to bits. Choose for those that were advantage to Microsoft not that they were correct.

    bw Quicken in a business brings you to a big question. Should they be using it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_resource_planning

    If they should be using ERP class all those run from Linux servers. Desktop client is not really important.

    bw at times you should lose some of the applications you are using because they no longer suit your business or what you need. Most businesses and users don’t because they don’t do assessments of what they should be using.

    bw Like Microsoft Office this is something so simple. You want all documents to print the file name they were sourced from. Try doing this in MS Office 2003 on. MS Office 2000 you could, Current day Libreoffice and other competitors you can with a file of filename just not set fixed it updates to what ever the current filename is.

    Microsoft changed in MS Office 2003 how the file name inserted field works. So it only updates when you update the field. You can insert a macro into the document but then you get a warning every time you open the document about a macro.

    bw so for some places handling a large volume of forms and you don’t want people using personal copies or forgetting to update printed file-name when new revision of file has been made MS Office is no longer suitable.

    This is where the 90/10 split comes from with IBM. Normally if you do access on what is needed to prevent issues in processes from the software side 90 percent of your staff don’t need Windows or MS Office.

    bw
    –Anyone contemplating buying another style of computer will naturally factor in the cost and hassle involved in having to replace those familiar items as well.–
    What you have not factored in here is the long term costs of keeping on using the same applications even when they are no longer up-to the job.

    Microsoft Office has not got better with age in all areas. Some important areas like tracing what file a document was printed from have got worse.

    bw the not meeting what the business requires can be that Windows machine just acquired with MS Office.

    The price advantage is not that simple to calculate.

    Linux machine might only cost you 25 to 50 dollars less new. The fact you can run it until it fairly much explodes and keep it on the latest version of the OS.( that has been true for the past 12 years so no reason for it not to be true for the next 10).

    bw the extended life span of the Linux unit the cost saving in hardware is way more than 25 to 50 dollars. You can fairly much double the life span on quality hardware before it finally goes in bin.

    3-5 moved to 10 years plus. Now areas where Linux suits in your business heck 100 to 200 dollars more could still done over TCO could still be cheaper.

    The big thing Munich has reported is the fact they don’t have to replace the Linux machines as frequently.

    What was the average Linux ram requirement for desktop in the year 2000. The answer is 256 megs. Its taken 10 years for that to double to 512 megs. Most likely another 10 to make it to 1G.

    Its a little hard to buy new a machine with only 1G of ram. CPU specs are the same. Linux growth in CPU Ram and Disc requirements is very slow compare to Windows. So a new Linux machine today you will be able to run until it burns out. Not replacing just because you need a new OS.

    bw businesses don’t need all rounder machines that much. They need machines that do particular roles well. So yes Linux is more suitable in business than home due to defined roles.

  7. bw says:

    ” GNU/Linux would be superior because the price/performance ratio would be lower.”

    I have seen studies that came to the opposite conclusion. Microsoft published a long series of them a couple of years ago, as I remember. Another big factor in an ongoing business is the loss of use of one’s previously purchased software applications. Almost everyone who has a Windows computer also has some software, whether it is MS Office or Quicken or some game or personal time management program, that is dependent on a Windows OS. Anyone contemplating buying another style of computer will naturally factor in the cost and hassle involved in having to replace those familiar items as well.

    That added expense and time consumption factor are going to be compared to whatever price savings are available for the Linux computer. So far, that difference has often been nil or even more costly for a Linux computer when purchased from one of the vendors who supply them. Where Linux has been offered at a price advantage, the difference has been fairly slight, often $25 to $50, which, prorated over years of use is too little to justify the loss of experience and risk of the Linux computer not meeting expectations.

    I don’t believe that Linux can ever overcome that fact of life.

  8. oiaohm says:

    George Wilson you also have to be aware of cosmetics.

    One of the studies in Australia found to shock horror that for the likes of moisturisers lot of the cheep generics were in fact better quality with more active ingredients than the ones people were paying big dollars for.

    George Wilson cheap does not instantly equal lack of quality. Same with being expensive does not mean it has more features than cheap.

    I buy from a local butcher I get better quality for same money than going to local supermarket.

    Note what Robert said that if both performed the job perfectly. If that happens the last metric is price. Correct go for the cheaper option its the same final result.

    There could be the true possibly in some places that the cheap meat at a supermarket is better quality than the local provides.

  9. George Wilson says:

    Even if GNU/Linux and that other OS were perfect and stayed out of the way to let the user’s work get done, GNU/Linux would be superior because the price/performance ratio would be lower.

    Interesting. An indirect admittance that Linux is far from perfect and does not stay out of the user’s way. Must be the Easter spirit.

    Besides, your argument doesn’t work. Even if products A and B are deemed “perfect”, and A costs considerably less than B or nothing at all, it could still be desirable to pay for B due to it having features A has not. Cheap meat from the supermarket freezer is also “perfect”, as it’ll fill your stomach. But it still can be very desirable to visit the butcher or the farmer to get better meat.

    That’s … wait for it … choice!

  10. George Wilson says:

    @JD:

    Your argument would have some merit if Linux was the only OS I have tried. Reality is, I have used both OSes to do exactly the same thing, and Linux came out on top by a mile. If that isn’t objective enough, I don’t know what is.

    Nope, still see no objectivity. Ever heard of intersubjective verifiability?

    Important note: I’m not saying that Linux isn’t the right tool for your job. But that’s the problem: it is only your job and only you have concluded that Linux is superior by your personal standards.

    So unless you present us with specific use cases described in an unambiguous manner which can be tested by others (intersubjectively verified) there’s really no case to be made here, however often you state Linux to be superior.

  11. George Wilson wrote, “stop touting an OS as superior merely because it works for you. That’s not a basis for any kind of objective evaluation.”

    Even if GNU/Linux and that other OS were perfect and stayed out of the way to let the user’s work get done, GNU/Linux would be superior because the price/performance ratio would be lower.

  12. JD says:

    @George

    Your argument would have some merit if Linux was the only OS I have tried. Reality is, I have used both OSes to do exactly the same thing, and Linux came out on top by a mile. If that isn’t objective enough, I don’t know what is.

  13. oiaohm says:

    Ivan don’t always take the first answer.
    http://lists.debian.org/debian-amd64/2013/03/msg00037.html

    Even from Microsoft the first answer is not always correct. In this case force install make 64 bit version work again. But there is a big bad problem. with the 32 bit version on 64 bit system.

    Finds a nice bug in lsb-core:i386 that is not simple to fix. Chroot is about the simple answer until packaging script get fixed.

    Also you do need to know something as well Ivan.

    ia32-libs ia32-libs-gtk as transitional package exists in testing, Also they exist in the old stable.

    The only way amd64 bit google earth is not installing is if you are set to unstable Ivan. So bleeding edge development.

    Now someone running beta test version of Windows running into trouble and getting incorrect advice at times who would you blame Ivan.

    I would agree the debian guys could have been a little clearing in this case.

  14. George Wilson says:

    @JD

    Your experience is entirely subjective. I never had great problems with Windows. That’s a subjective experience, too. Perhaps problems which you wouldn’t tolerate I do and vice versa. But stop touting an OS as superior merely because it works for you. That’s not a basis for any kind of objective evaluation.

  15. Ivan says:

    Debian’s crack support team’s advice

    1. Re-compile the application yourself, as a proper 64-bit application.

    2. If they won’t let you have the Source Code (which should be enough, in
    and of itself, to raise a huge red flag in your mind; just what are they trying
    to conceal from you?), run it in a 32-bit chroot.

  16. bw says:

    ” One cow fits a family with a mess of kids quite well”

    Doesn’t offer much of a solution to an old couple or a small family, though. Which is more common today? Plus, there is a lot of land involved and I would bet that 99+% of the inhabitants of Winnipeg do not have sufficient land to keep even one cow around.

    “Calves can be slaughtered as well for meat”

    That was where I got beef for a few years, namely buying a male dairy breed raised to 500 to 600 pounds. Even grass-fed with grain mix supplement, the meat was tender and tasty. Our family managed to use one a year. My friend took care of all the details and I only had to visit the packing plant and pick up the wrapped and frozen result. I paid him the on-the-hoof price on the day he took it in, which in those days was about 39 cents a pound. We got a couple of pigs, too. That’s where I got used to country ham. An awful lot of lard came with it, though. My mother took it all for baking.

  17. Ivan says:

    $15000 is just a silly number.

    SideFX houdini global access + upgrade plan = $10,990

    Autodesk SoftImage per seat license = $3,145

    Mari 3d painter =$1,995

    Total cost = $16,130

    And stop comparing the amateur crap you create with Hollywood.

  18. oiaohm says:

    bw there is a solution for those with less need of milk as well. Exactly why do you have to drink cows milk.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheep_milk is a historic one over looked and you need it to make particular cheeses.

    I grew up in spear grass country. Choice there is Goats or Cattle for milk. Spear grass kinda does in sheep.

    bw also as normal you prove you incompetence.

    –What’s interesting as well is that the cow will produce about 10,000 pounds of milk per year if fed on grass.–

    That is not even close to correct.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dairy_cattle#Milk_production_levels

    Its basically 15000 pounds + with cattle.

    At least you daily figure was in ball park. Bw. Want less milk go smaller creature. A goat produces like 2.7L a day. This also requires smaller land area and less feed to store for winter. There are other creatures as well.

    bw in fact if I spend my time on the HP and IBM ones I can find Linux Conf videos where they mention selling to those two parties. Linux Conf videos are something you don’t watch bw.

  19. bw wrote, “3 gallons per day and that is a lot of milk for one family to consume”

    It is but it’s turned into cream, butter, ice-cream and cheese as well as being drunk. One cow fits a family with a mess of kids quite well. Grain-feeding cattle is much more expensive than letting them wander around a pasture. Besides, you can do that on rather poor farmland too rocky to grow grain. Where I grew up, just getting the garden stone-free lowered the garden a foot so it flooded every spring.

    Hay is pretty easy to make. Mow the long grass a few times during the summer, let it dry a few days in the sun and rake it up. It can be baled or just piled. Many barns have a loft where the hay is stored so you can easily drop it down to the cow as needed. In the winter a cow walks around less and so needs less food. Milk production varies during the year so converting it into products that store well like butter and cheese is quite useful. Calves can be slaughtered as well for meat. It works.

  20. JD says:

    @George Wilson
    As a programmer, I can attest that Linux makes a huge difference to a developer’s productivity. Take us for example, we are a small shop with only a handful of programmers.

    My machine runs Linux Mint (13) on an Alienware M14x with 16Gigs, Core i7 and 3 hard drives in the machine itself. My machine gives me the confidence that I can go about getting work done, without having to work on my machine’s OS itself. Its stability gives me the ability to do that, as is evident from its uptime:
    21:12:14 up 17 days, 23:39, 1 user, load average: 0.26, 0.54, 0.76
    The software I use to get the job done does play a huge part in my productivity, but they would be useless without a rock solid OS beneath them, like a house built on sand and not on rocks. I have two instances of Eclipse, Quanta+, 3 browsers with ~30 tabs open on each, a handful of PDF and ODF files, about 20 windows of Pluma, about 6 terminals, most of them SSHed into multiple Linux servers, and MySQL workbench and some terminals to MySQL just from looking around the different workspaces. My machine is rock solid, has been that way for almost two years now, and I couldn’t be happier.

    Take my colleague on the other hand. He runs the other OS, and primarily works with supporting the company’s products like SharePain. He spent almost the entire day today troubleshooting an issue with “Windows Explorer has closed unexpectedly, M$ is checking for a solution to the problem”. He says he left his computer on last night to do automatic updates, he comes back this morning and it is still ‘installing updates’, and soon after waiting for an hour and rebooting, he runs into this issue. Not to mention the usual snail’s pace his machine performs at, despite the fact he has comparable hardware to mine. IMO M$ should be sued for all the lost productivity they cause in the workplace with their inferior, buggy and certainly not fit for development use OS, let alone install the garbage on a server.

    He reminds me of myself about 7 years back, when I was in a similar boat, wasting hoards of time simply trying to fix the OS instead of getting the job I was hired to do done. My network admin introduced me to Dapper (Ubuntu) back when it just came out, and boy, am I ever grateful to him for that. I never touched the other OS since then (except an old copy of XP on my desktop soley for playing GTA) and have been an advocate of Linux and open source since then.

    So yeah, the OS does matter to content creators, in a big way.

  21. bw says:

    “Funny enough …”

    More unsubstantiated blather. I guess if you are desperate enough, you can invent some answer that you can sell yourself for almost any problem that arises. A common name for that sort of behavior is “denial”. I remember some vague learning about Greek literature where such convenient inventions were called “deus ex machina” although that is Latin and how it applies to Greeks I do not remember.

    Read about it at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deus_ex_machina

    You might wonder, though, why the trade press and analysts are always so focused on these minor businesses instead of on these major outlets that you have uncovered. They fawn over Windows as the leader and ignore the wonderful, free, Linux that actually runs the world’s business. Why is that? I am sure you can invent some kind of answer.

    I think it much more likely, though, that the main stream of commerce is what the trade news is all about and if it isn’t being discussed there, it is of no consequence. Certainly people who are in the know are not going to want to read about things that are not important.

  22. bw says:

    “they’re not likely to produce much more milk”

    Maybe I am becoming as crazy as that other guy. I had to look up what there was to know about dairy cows, just to satisfy my curiosity. It was fairly astounding.

    You are correct, if perhaps a bit on the low side, in estimating 30 pounds of grass, fairly dry, per day for a pasture-fed cow. What’s interesting as well is that the cow will produce about 10,000 pounds of milk per year if fed on grass.

    Barn kept, grain-fed dairy cows more than double that production, I found, although at a similar increase in output of manure and gases which create other problems for the farm operator. Good for growing grain to feed next years cows, though.

    I conclude that my original premise is more than correct, though. 10,000 pounds of mild is some 3 gallons per day and that is a lot of milk for one family to consume. Further, it is very difficult to grow grass year round, so you have to store up equivalent amounts of grass for the parts of the year where the live grass is dormant. Plus you have to move the herd from pasture to pasture to allow the grass to replenish even during the growing season. Only a few days per pasture per month are apparently available for grazing.

    All of this is clearly too much of a hassle for individual consumption and, like huge server farms, results in individuals purchasing services from an ISP or milk from a supermarket.

  23. oiaohm says:

    bw the problem is the custom server market is larger than the prebuilt server market. Yes drinking water is the same. Most places tap water drinkers out number bottle water drinkers.

    Funny enough IBM and HP produces some custom parts for Amazon and Facebook. But since these parts are not full servers they don’t appear in the server numbers.

    bw
    –If they do not buy the vendor’s wares and never will, why should any of these companies care what they use?–
    This is the problem. They do still buy vendor wares in the form of parts.

    IBM and HP annual revenue is over 100 billion each.

    The pre-build server market is a drop in the ocean. There are a lot of vendors that just service the custom hardware market.

    Ground surveys mostly are showing the custom is the common the pre-built is the rarity.

  24. bw wrote, “I am fairly sure that you cannot actually keep a herd of cows or even a single cow subsisting on just pasture grass.”

    Certainly you can. Cattle are “designed” to eat grass from specialized tongue, teeth and stomachs. They will eat grain and it might help them grow a little faster but they’re not likely to produce much more milk. We used to give them a handful of grain as an inducement to enter the milking stalls. We used crushed oats as I recall but it was not enough to affect the diet of the cattle compared to the 30 pounds or so of grass they ate daily. Farmers often see that there is a little clover or alfalfa in the pasture to increase protein content.

  25. That last is an interesting list. I see that The Mill which has been around 20 years and thriving uses only GNU/Linux while most of them use XP or MacOS and some others.

  26. George Wilson says:

    And if you’d rather believe someone working in the field:

    I work at Reel FX and we use Linux on 90%-95% of the machines in the building. The reason that a lot of VFX companies, including ours, use Linux is because it is stable, secure, and it makes it easier on our IT department to maintain and deploy. We use Fedora on our floor machines and RHEL (RedHat Enterprise Linux) on our Flame/Smoke systems.

    Source: Luxology Forums

  27. George Wilson says:

    I think the “trolls'” (not really helpful for a discussion) were only pointing out that Robert’s argument is a bit weird, because the creative people create with the help of special-purpose, mostly proprietary, software tools, not with Linux per se.

    I’d make the argument that Linux enables studios to do more faster. ILM saw a manifold speed increase when they switched from their SGI’s running IRIX to workstations running Linux. The vast render farms are made possible by Linux.

    It’s not so much about creativity, it’s about brute force computing for an unbeatable price.

    There’s actually a website dedicated to system administrators in (game/animation/vfx) studios:

    http://www.studiosysadmins.com/wiki/display/using_operatingsystems/

    They have, among other things, this tabular listing (a bit outdated) what operating systems are used at which studio:

    http://www.studiosysadmins.com/wiki/display/using_operatingsystems/

  28. kozmcrae says:

    Wow, the Microsoft trolls just can’t stand any accomplishment Linux has in any field. No, they can’t have any of that. It must be quashed immediately and vociferously.

    Ivan and bw are falling all over themselves saying no, no, no! This isn’t what it looks like. Here’s a clue for you two, your protests say all that needs to be said. Your dire need to prove this to be something, anything other than what it is, is the telling factor.

    You can’t win in your struggle to keep Linux and open source from its rightful place at the top of the IT food chain. That fact makes you fools. Sorry about that, but it has nothing to do with my observations, it’s your own fault. You put yourself in that position.

  29. bw says:

    “IDC does not count Goggle or Amazon or Facebook or ”

    The bottled water people do not count tap water spigots either when measuring the market for their products. It does not matter to anyone in the business.

    Perhaps companies that manufacture computer components care about Google or Facebook plans, but, if they never buy traditional servers, IBM, Dell, HP, Oracle, etc., don’t give a rap. If they do not buy the vendor’s wares and never will, why should any of these companies care what they use?

    Pre-packaged servers are a $50B or so world-wide business and that is enough to garner the attention of the major suppliers. If the hardware vendors do not get any business from these sources, neither do the software vendors. No need to bother with them if you are selling something since they are not buyers.

  30. bw says:

    I am not a dairy farmer, but I used to know one from whom I would buy freezer beef and pork, cut and packaged, of course. He farmed part-time and was a computer service tech the rest of the time. I am fairly sure that you cannot actually keep a herd of cows or even a single cow subsisting on just pasture grass. Most of my friend’s time on his dairy farm was actually spent growing corn and getting it processed into feed for that small herd. He eventually bought a far larger farm and moved to Tennessee to farm full time, eschewing computers and associated miseries.

    In any case, the proposition is that you cannot keep the cow economically compared to the cost of purchasing milk and I do not see where you have shown anything to deny that.

  31. bw wrote, “You need a fairly large institution, though, to justify your own dairy cow herd.”

    Nope. Bought milk lately? It pays to have a cow in the farmyard. Keeps the grass in check and produces fertilizer for the garden at no extra charge. When I was a boy on the farm we had a tiny herd and exported cream. That’s been killed off by the regulation about pasteurization but a family can still make good use of a cow. The only negative is housing and feeding the cow over the winter. That takes an investment but the cow itself is relatively inexpensive if bought as a calf and inseminated annually. I have a riding lawn-mower. If my property was just a few times larger, I could keep a cow in the garage over winter. Of course the little woman and local by-laws prohibit that, but a goat maybe… I don’t really live “on the farm” but adjacent to farming communities. I need to persuade her to move once more…

    Butter, ice-cream, cream, cheese, calves and milk are all sufficient reason to own a cow and the effort is probably around 1h per day, two milkings and some mowing. Some people spend more time than that on cooking, a hobby or a blog…

    I am working on the little woman to sell our current too-large property and replace it with a cheaper property and some bush/pasture where a cow would be in place.

  32. Chuckle. I would have blogged about that but I was away with just my smartphone when I heard the news. I am not sure what to blog about there. It’s “business as usual” for FLOSS, huge growth that I have observed for more than a decade. Still the apologists ignore it, deride it, and do their best to sabotage it. FLOSS is not going away anytime soon and it will have a huge share of any segment of IT in which it is not already there.

    While it is good and not really news that big business is using FLOSS. The future news and what is happening now in the grassroots of IT is that young people everywhere are adapting FLOSS at a great rate and they are demanding to use what they know when they enter the workforce. Countries like BRICS are promoting FLOSS in schools so growth is accelerating. The world is promoting Android/Linux and GNU/Linux. The dramatic growth people see now is just the lit fuse sputtering towards the big bomb. 2012 was huge for Android/Linux and GNU/Linux. It’s just a few big OEMs still licking M$’s hand that remain a problem.

  33. Ivan wrote, “So it only takes throwing $15,000 worth of software on top of linux to make it useful and a crack team of software developers to make it stable?”

    HAHAHA! Gasp! Now I am awake! I have been using GNU/Linux to create for more than a decade and the only time I have been the least tempted to use a few dollars worth of software licences is in video-editing but because I don’t have any need for the “pro” codecs, I can use the $free version of LightWorksTM just fine. I do have a relative however who will have a career in video and it interested in the “pro” version for less than $100 a licence.

    $15000 is just a silly number. I have talked to folks who are severely locked-in and they spend just a few $thousand.

    Debian already has a crack team of developers and millions of coders contribute the upstream code for them so the end-user’s cost is tiny, mostly Internet-connectivity and a bit of time configuring. I am often scolded for being incompetent here yet I have zero trouble keeping a bunch of GNU/Linux systems running locally and remotely. Stable? HAHAHA! I forget what unstable means since I use GNU/Linux. I equate instability as using that other OS. I can’t imagine why anyone would want to use an OS that slows down deliberately and by malware, requires tons of re-re-reboots, and you have to pay for the privilege of running it on hardware that you own…
    uptime
    15:23:20 up 242 days, 17:16, 1 user, load average: 0.24, 0.14, 0.10

    Does that seem unstable? That’s this server. The one you are using to post and read comments. It’s 1000+ miles away from me, in Texas, yet it runs smoothly with very little maintenance, thanks to Debian GNU/Linux.

  34. George Wilson says:

    You can also create with a pencil and a piece of paper. I’m not sure what’s your point, Robert. Especially since all big packages used by the likes of DreamWorks are available on all major platforms.

    This is certainly not helpful Linux advocacy.

  35. oiaohm says:

    Really this is the big problem most people take numbers at face value without checking method for collection flaws.

    In the case of the IDC they are huge.

  36. oiaohm says:

    bw it a bit hard when you know IDC does not count Goggle or Amazon or Facebook or basically everything else big in the Internet. Why because most of the big guys custom build and custom order there hardware avoiding the big OEM’s a lot.

    There is a lot of Linux stuff IDC is not counting. All three being Goggle, Amazon, Facebook have there parts custom built.

    IDC does not track motherboard sales by gigabyte and others. Or case sales into the white-box market.

    bw Linux foundation runs ground surveys.

    So how does IDC know that Microsoft is half the server spending when IDC never collects the numbers on how much a lot of companies are spending.

  37. bw says:

    “A dramatic increase …”

    Ah, the golden words of the famous SJVN! Can prosperity not be just around the corner? No doubt at all that such a noble effort will triumph and uplift everyone in the world someday. And Linus is so cute!

    Why is it that the drab statistics keepers like IDC keep showing Windows servers as leading the market?

    “Microsoft Windows server hardware demand was down 0.9% year over year in 3Q12 with quarterly server hardware revenue totaling $6.2 billion representing 51.1% of overall quarterly factory revenue, up 1.6 points over the prior year’s quarter. This is the second time in the past three quarters that Windows has been responsible for driving more than half of all server spending worldwide.”

    http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS23808612#.UVRHZmbD-C0

    Dirty liars! Don’t they even read Steven’s column anymore?

  38. Ivan says:

    You would think this would lay to rest the idea that one needs that other OS or a PC from Apple to create

    So it only takes throwing $15,000 worth of software on top of linux to make it useful and a crack team of software developers to make it stable?

  39. Mats Hagglund says:

    “A dramatic increase in the use of Linux for mission-critical workloads has grown consistently year over year to reach 73 percent in 2013. Reliance on Linux for cloud and big data is a strong contributing factor. And, the future looks bright for the operating system with 80 percent of the world’s largest enterprises planning to increase their use of Linux servers over the next five years, while the number who plan to purchase Windows servers is at an all-time low of 20 percent.”

    http://www.zdnet.com/big-business-buys-into-big-linux-7000013209/

    http://www.linuxfoundation.org/news-media/announcements/2013/03/global-enterprises-increase-linux-adoption-critical-growth-areas

  40. oiaohm says:

    bw in fact the answer is yes to some of all that. http://www.openvdb.org is a direct open source project from dreamworks they use in there direct animation processing.

    http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/109079/DreamWorks_Animation_aims_for_open_source_with_SOA_project
    Yes the project management is open source and on Linux at Dreamworks.

    Dreamworks is a Mixed source set-up. Some things are performed by closed source. Important things like paying everyone wages and project planning are performed by FOSS.

    Rendering side still has a large section closed source at Dreamworks. Linux is at the core of Dreamworks operations.

    –As I posted elsewhere recently, it is the “keep a cow” vs “buy milk in bottles” decision. You need a fairly large institution, though, to justify your own dairy cow herd.–
    Not a model that applies to FOSS that much.

    There are different levels in the FOSS.
    http://www.zentyal.org/ and other distributions like to try to be out the box ready as able with light support costs.

    Depending on what you need it can require a lower skill staff to manage a Windows network with zentyal servers than a Windows network with Windows servers.

    bw your example is dead poor as normal. Linux is far more diverse to fit into such a simple compare idea.

  41. bw says:

    Do they use some sort of FOSS application to do all that? Attributing creativity of this sort to the OS used on a server is like attributing Tiger Woods’ success to a brand of golf ball.

    Companies that have a significant amount of work to do with servers such that they can justify keeping an in-house staff to provide and maintain them are probably well-advised to use Linux in lieu of paying for Windows Server licenses.

    As I posted elsewhere recently, it is the “keep a cow” vs “buy milk in bottles” decision. You need a fairly large institution, though, to justify your own dairy cow herd.

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