Even Intel Profits By Slipping The Bonds of Wintel

“In the company’s annual IT report released earlier this month, CIO Kim Stevenson credited the BYOD program with saving each employee about 57 minutes per workday.”
see Efficiency on the rise as BYOD expands at Intel

The idea that a monopoly based on M$’s OS is the right way to do IT fails on every front:

  • cost,
  • performance, and
  • flexibility.

I recommend Debian GNU/Linux for most tasks in IT. It’s low cost, fast and flexible. It’s licence and modularity and the fact that it’s open source provide huge benefit to any organization using it.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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6 Responses to Even Intel Profits By Slipping The Bonds of Wintel

  1. oiaohm says:

    bw coal mining is always a short term thing in an area.

    Yes there is only so much coal.

    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/02/21/mine-f21.html

    Not exactly sure that I would want to be a unemployed coal miner in West Virginia. So far this year 4 vacant positions due to death.

    bw I think this is another case of you not doing your homework. Saying this about some of the Australian coal mines that have had a zero death rate for the last 10 years would had some legs.

    West Virginia not so much. Unless work place health and safety is fixed there the unemployed coal miners are going to find self with job in the worst possible way.

    –They have been eliminated.–
    Being eliminated and put in a 6 foot deep hole is very much a possibility for West Virginia coal miners.

    bw I could call what you were saying poor informed.

  2. bw says:

    “Those people were not eliminated. They became carpenters, plumbers, electricians, heavy equipment operators and clerks.”

    Maybe in Canada, but in places like West Virginia, they are still unemployed coal miners sitting around complaining about hard times. They have been eliminated.

  3. bw wrote, “There were huge numbers of people with picks and shovels needed to grade a construction site that were eliminated by inventing the steam shovel. That gave way to more construction and an improved economy, but few of those pick and shovel men ever learned to operate the steam shovel.”

    Those people were not eliminated. They became carpenters, plumbers, electricians, heavy equipment operators and clerks. It’s all good. The economy grows in diversity as well as numbers of people employed. In the old days there were far fewer types of jobs compared to today. In those days probably literacy was optional. Now high school is almost compulsory. Few jobs exist for illiterates but there are many more options for educated people. I remember when I graduated high school the second time. I had so many choices, I just picked the subject on my report card with the highest mark and pursued physics. There were dozens of career-paths I could have chosen. Fifty years earlier there may have been very few just based on transportation limiting my mobility.

  4. bw says:

    “It’s a temporary effect ”

    I think that it is pretty permanent for a lot of people. If efficiency improves, there are always fewer people needed to do any set amount of work than were necessary before the improvement. And there is frequently a permanent dislocation.

    There were huge numbers of people with picks and shovels needed to grade a construction site that were eliminated by inventing the steam shovel. That gave way to more construction and an improved economy, but few of those pick and shovel men ever learned to operate the steam shovel.

    When you look at the kind of jobs that are being eliminated by enhanced personal communications, it is apparent that a lot of people are not going to find a job elsewhere.

    What has happened in my state is that the reduced need for office workers has resulted in lower economic activity, lower house values, with lower tax collections, with reduced budgets for schools, with closed schools, with laid-off teachers. How is it in Canada?

  5. bw observed, “The good news is that we are more efficient. The bad news is that we have fewer jobs.”

    Any new technology can be disruptive. It’s a temporary effect however because with the new technology new ways of working and new jobs arrive. The transition takes time.

    GNU/Linux is an example. In schools where I worked it was disruptive. Productivity of most staff and students increased dramatically as there was no “slowing down” and malware. The need for IT guys scrambling around keeping that other OS going disappeared. However, now those schools can do so much more with IT so students and staff have their own databases and websites to manage and there is a real need for more expertise in creating and managing more complex systems. That is a growing trend but there is a lag. It may take a school a year or two to realize they should manage the proliferation of sites and documents with a management system.

    Some of my installations helped that way. Instead of having documents scattered over 100 hard drives they were concentrated over just a few on a few terminal servers where a search engine could make everything that should be shared available. It takes some expertise to do that and either present staff need some training or new people with new skills need to be hired.

    The new jobs following in the wake of new technology are not necessarily in the same places. For example, the “goto” guys in a thin client environment might be the secretary of the school or department who has a small stack of replacement units that can be plugged in when a unit fails. The local IT guy can be replaced by an itinerant from another organization or remote administration.

    The economy is a tree, not a pile of rigid boxes. M$ and many of its partners are not part of the tree but rigid boxes attempting to control growth to the limits of the walls.

  6. bw says:

    “57 minutes per workday”

    That is huge. What it is saying is that they have some 10% or so increase in employee efficiency as a direct result. Presumably, such gains are not limited to semiconductor manufacturing businesses and such a result might be projected across all industry.

    I have been convinced of this phenomenon being factual for some time. I think that you can say that usage of these devices started to accelerate about 5 or 6 years ago and the results have not been studied very extensively.

    I think that this can be shown to account for the sluggish recovery in the world’s economies during the same period of time. In 2008 many companies reacted to the economic collapse of various financial schemes by cutting back on personnel in anticipation of lower economic activity. As the economy recovered commercially, staff was not restored at the same rate due to the efficiencies of using more personal computing devices to streamline workflow.

    The level of world economic activity has recovered and even grown, shown by the financial results from these companies and their accompanying stock prices, but the size of staff has not kept pace as companies actualize the efficiencies noted in this report.

    The good news is that we are more efficient. The bad news is that we have fewer jobs.

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