Statistics Finland – Open Source in Business

“Open source code office software is used by 43 per cent of enterprises. It is used by 49 per cent of enterprises in the smallest size category and by 23 per cent of those in the largest size category.

An open source code operating system is also quite general and it is used by 28 per cent of enterprises. It is used more commonly in large enterprises with at least 100 employees (41%) than in enterprises of smaller size categories, where its prevalence varies from 26 to 30 per cent. Examined by economic activity, its use is clearly most common in information and communication (58%).”

see Statistics Finland – Open source code software used by 79 per cent of enterprises 2011-11-24.

Use of open source code software in spring 2011, share of enterprises with at least ten employees.

© Statistics Finland Open source code software used by 79 per cent of enterprises, 2011-11-24


If 43% use FLOSS office software, the proportion using GNU/Linux desktops could be pretty high. I have asked for a breakdown on that, if they have it. They plan an update next month. By comparison, NetApplications shows 3% for GNU/Linux in Finland. I don’t think that’s the case. I ask you, if 67% use a FLOSS browser, 43% use a FLOSS office application, wouldn’t somewhere around 36% use both and not have much use for that other OS? I would guess 18% use GNU/Linux.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in technology and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Statistics Finland – Open Source in Business

  1. kozmcrae says:

    MK, new nym, same old BS. Nice to see you back “insert former banned troll”… *not*!

    MK wrote:

    “Just look at Munich! It only took them, what, 8 years and a team of experts to switch over 10K computers.”

    You’ve been told so many times before the story of Munich. Why should you be told again? You don’t deserve the time of day troll. Look at the time stamp of your post. That’s more than you deserve troll. Go back under your bridge and wallow in your own poop.

  2. MK wrote, “look at Munich! It only took them, what, 8 years and a team of experts to switch over 10K computers.”

    Look at Extremadura. They migrated tens of thousands over the weekend.

  3. MK wrote, “How many ordinary users will venture into downloading an ISO, burning it to a CD, booting, going through partitioning, installing and troubleshooting? Only the very curious or the masochists.”

    Not so. The computer geeks of the world don’t need to be curious or masochistic to install GNU/Linux. Most consumers who can run as Administrator or some privileged account can visit http://goodbye-microsoft.com, download an executable and run it. Then they reboot and accept the defaults and provide usernames and passwords and they are running Debian GNU/Linux. It’s cute and cuts through some hard parts like burning a .iso and booting from CD.

  4. MK wrote, “Switching to a different platform, however, is a different story. Just look at Munich! It only took them, what, 8 years and a team of experts to switch over 10K computers.”

    There were two things that took a lot of time, migrating the documents/templates and migrating various applications. If they had had a centralized system that migration would have been much easier but each department had its own stuff. That meant more work but it was still worthwhile. They have broken even and should have lower costs going forward. They had to rationalize their system in any event and selecting GNU/Linux made sense to them.

    They didn’t have a “team of experts” but used their own staff plus some consultants.

  5. MK says:

    This is wishful thinking. Many will install free software like Firefox or LibreOffice on their Windows machines, because it’s easy, and if it doesn’t work, it’s also easy to uninstall. Switching to a different platform, however, is a different story. Just look at Munich! It only took them, what, 8 years and a team of experts to switch over 10K computers. How many ordinary users will venture into downloading an ISO, burning it to a CD, booting, going through partitioning, installing and troubleshooting? Only the very curious or the masochists.

Leave a Reply