TM Repository RUNs GNU/Linux

“Anyone who has ever browsed a technology website, be it for help, advice or information, can tell you that every last one of them is infected by Linux zealots. They evangelize the Linux operating system by trolling forums and blogs, spreading lies and exaggerations about the Linux while simultaneously spreading FUD about Windows, OSX, BSD, and their favourite enemy, Microsoft.”

via TM Repository.

Chuckle. Netcraft.com reports the site runs GNU/Linux and is not in the top million most active websites. I guess after two years, they are discovering that hate does not sell. Perhaps that’s why they send apologists to my site.

MrPogson.com also runs GNU/Linux and is 240031 on their ranking of most popular websites. Could it be that real people love Free Software, GNU/Linux and small cheap computers?

Hmmm… I guess freedom-loving people win over bigots.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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124 Responses to TM Repository RUNs GNU/Linux

  1. Satipera wrote, “Considering the huge amount of trolling you have to put up with I suppose the odd “Idiot” is bound to slip out for both of you.”

    “Idiot!” was one of my father’s favourite expressions. He used it a lot in city-traffic. He was a bus driver and saw a lot of stupid things. He had driven a bus in the city for 25 years without an accident when a guy drove through a red light at high speed and moved his bus to the other side of the road. Minutes before, he had unloaded a bunch of school kids standing in the aisle. I learned a lot from him.

    I guess the term is overused. Clearly the trolls deliberately holding forth an irrational view in order to provoke reasonable persons are not idiots but psychopaths. There is a difference although one may be more damaging than another.

  2. Satipera says:

    @Robert Pogson It wasn’t aimed at you 🙂 but @Oiaohm. Considering the huge amount of trolling you have to put up with I suppose the odd “Idiot” is bound to slip out for both of you.

  3. Satipera wrote, “you do FLOSS no good by frequently calling them idiots.”

    Of course not, but it makes me feel better. After all, I cannot grab them by the throat and choke them as oldman says.

    Actually, many of the trolls and naysayers who come her are not idiots but clever liars/word-twisters. They put words in others mouths, repeat FUD/myths about FLOSS and generally do their best to waste my time and energy. Fortunately, my enthusiasm remains good on some days and I continue.

    The more desperate measures that appear in the trolls’ arguments the weaker their position and the stronger is FLOSS. FLOSS will do well with or without me. I use it and contribute what I can. Now that the major project of remodelling my old home is done, I will look forward to other projects this winter. I plan to build a greenhouse, go hunting and to finish the organization of my workshop and den, but I will also do somelthing related to FLOSS. I will add more to this blog and I will try some kind of install-fest or other publicity stunt for FLOSS locally.

    Thanks for visiting.

  4. Satipera says:

    Oiaohm

    I have been reading Mrpogson comments on and off for a few years. I came to it via Techrights (BN). I realise that dealing with some of the people who post here must be very frustrating but you do FLOSS no good by frequently calling them idiots.

  5. oldman wrote of M$, “Guess who is in Kenya.”

    Too late, GNU/Linux is taking over

    The government of Kenya has done a lot to facilitate IT in Kenya like promotion of wireless. FLOSS works for them.

  6. oiaohm says:

    oldman
    –You still don’t get it do you hamster. When the commodore 64 was available it was a very different world with far fewer options for anyone who wanted a personal computer. Now with all of the cheap x86 hardware floating around. crappy hobbyist computers like RPi are at best a niche.–

    The problem has not gone away. Its only gone away for you because your wage is worth something. In a lot of the world a full blow X86 computer compared to their wages is still like going out and buying a full Minicomputer when you got your first PC.

    x86 hardware is not that cheep.

    Oldman in entry level computers compared to global wages there is bugger all. Just because you live in a richer country and don’t see the poor that does not mean they don’t exist.

    –So the poor of the world get to use developed world crap toys instead of usable systems.–

    Be truthful is this not what you used in the early PC’s because you could not afford a full blown Mini-Computer at home. Reality here take your rose colour glasses off and consider what you really did. Please stop this do as say not as I did point of view.

    You have talked about the reason why you used the early PC’s I could pull that up. Then I can pull the USA wages at time for price of machine vs average wages then pull global average wages of today.

    The result is the current day machine need to land to be equal to the first PC you acquired for approx 150 USD. That is with Keyboard Mouse and Monitor. To be equal cost to when you got the PC.

    I don’t know how you get to 150 USD at current pricing of stuff but that is the price. The raspberry PI is in their acquirable price range.

    Reality the x86 PC is too expense for a lot of markets.

    Kenya recently passed mandatory open source usage inside it government for particular roles.

    http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Developers+lined+up+for+huge+gains+in+software+shift/-/1248928/1497380/-/item/0/-/webbqlz/-/index.html

    Oldman Microsoft of course is in Kenya because if this works its another lost market.

    Oldman really how many more markets can MS lose before it has to show.

  7. oldman says:

    “Kenya and many other countries are modernizing IT and skipping all of M$’s bullshit cripple-ware.”

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA….

    Guess who is in Kenya.

    http://www.microsoft.com/worldwide/phone/contact.aspx?country=Kenya

    The only buswah around here robert pogson is YOU, who has let his hatred of one company destroy his scientific objectivity.

  8. oldman, denying the obvious fact that IT is a huge economic lever, wrote, “Too bad those same people are also probably more worried about keeping body and soul together than they are about some idiotic computer.”

    Many in the emerging markets are acquiring IT so they can raise their national economies out of poverty instead of making M$ richer still. Really, oldman, do you think Kenya should be subsidizing Ballmer’s lifestyle? No! Kenya and many other countries are modernizing IT and skipping all of M$’s bullshit cripple-ware.

  9. Dann says:

    Wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of that trolling were Microsoft evangelists trying to reinforce the unpleasant Linux user stereotype.

  10. oldman says:

    “That may be true if you have a job and lots of cash. That is not true for more people in the world than in the established markets. Wintel is way too expensive for billions of people still.”

    So the poor of the world get to use developed world crap toys instead of usable systems. How nice of you, Pog to want to take advantage of their poverty to advance your anti-microsoft agenda!

    Too bad those same people are also probably more worried about keeping body and soul together than they are about some idiotic computer.

  11. oldman wrote, “Now with all of the cheap x86 hardware floating around. crappy hobbyist computers like RPi are at best a niche.”

    That may be true if you have a job and lots of cash. That is not true for more people in the world than in the established markets. Wintel is way too expensive for billions of people still. Raspberry PI lowers the threshold for usability of IT by quite a bit. $50 can fit into many more budgets many more ways than $300. The monitor, keyboard and mouse becomes the limiting factor and the world is loaded with smaller, cheaper varieties of those too. I bought excellent USB keyboards with USB ports and USB mouse combination from HP for $10. One can buy Chinese LCD monitors of small size quite suitable for kids or kiosks for less than the cost of the PI.

  12. oldman says:

    “The Rasbbery PI is on time line to match Commodore 64. The best selling of all the basic computers was the Commodore 64.”

    You still don’t get it do you hamster. When the commodore 64 was available it was a very different world with far fewer options for anyone who wanted a personal computer. Now with all of the cheap x86 hardware floating around. crappy hobbyist computers like RPi are at best a niche.

  13. oiaohm says:

    ch
    –What exactly do you mean with “early on”? The 1970ies and early 80ies, when MS Basic was installed on more than 800k machines?

    Oh, and just to put things into perspective: Nokia has sold ten times that many WP7 phones by now, and we all know that WP7 is a failure. So your point is?–

    Really it does not put it in perspective. Because the next phone after the Nokia WP7 is going to come from where. Did the Nokia name had pre-existing good will yes it did.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_64

    The Rasbbery PI is on time line to match Commodore 64. The best selling of all the basic computers was the Commodore 64.
    http://jeremyreimer.com/postman/node/329

    ch 800k machines is not even a full year yet. This is is more than the C64 did in it first year even scaling it up to current market size.

    Nokia had an established brand with WP7 to play on.

    A unknown brand moving 1 million units in the first year is basically unheard of. Yet it looks like the Raspberry PI will pull this off.

    That is what makes what going on with the Raspberry Pi Interesting. Now if more than 1 can move 1 million units in their first year we are talking a interesting disruption.

    This is the question. Is the Raspbery PI a one off or a sign of things to come.

    Sign of things to come is a big problem. We will know more as more of the items enter the market.

    800K does not sound like a lot. Until you wake up that Raspbery PI sales are restricted because they cannot get enough production.

    Nokia has not had production limits either because they could buy a few million units in advance.

    ch for a company that can buy a few million units in advance nokia sales have been horrible. Raspberry PI could only afford 30K in advance. This means you cannot really compare two. You can compare to panda board and other prototype boards that have stared out with 30K production.

  14. ch says:

    “That’s way more units than M$ started shipping early on.”

    What exactly do you mean with “early on”? The 1970ies and early 80ies, when MS Basic was installed on more than 800k machines?

    Oh, and just to put things into perspective: Nokia has sold ten times that many WP7 phones by now, and we all know that WP7 is a failure. So your point is?

  15. oiaohm says:

    oldman its too soon to know exactly where the Hobbyists will stop.
    –Hobbyists have a new toty and embedded systems see a potentially cheap microcontroller. Nothing more.–

    These Hobbyists are now designing new boards.

  16. oldman wrote, “800K to hobbyist plus development worldwide is entirely reasonable. Still nothing to care about.”

    That’s way more units than M$ started shipping early on.

  17. oldman says:

    “Something is going on oldman. Question is what.”

    Hobbyists have a new toty and embedded systems see a potentially cheap microcontroller. Nothing more.

    entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitate

  18. oldman says:

    “800 000 premade units cannot go to the device development market. They never need that many. Because they start producing there own boards after they have had a good look at the reference.”

    800K to hobbyist plus development worldwide is entirely reasonable. Still nothing to care about.

  19. oiaohm says:

    oldman
    –And nobody will give a crap. I past experience is any guide these systems will simply go nowhere except possibly as microcontrollers.–

    8088 chip first appeared as a micro-controller experiment board before the first XT was made.

    –Increasing sales of these prototyping systems for home usage is evidence.–
    Panda Board that is then followed by the rasbery pi sales numbers.

    Rasbery Pi first edition has produced over 800 000 units still got case of production not meeting demand. This is more than any other prototyping board in the same time frame.

    Before Rasbery Pi most boards proto boards with video out where expensive.

    oldman the Rasbery Pi is outselling all standard micro controller development boards. Also the boards with proper video out are outselling all other boards.

    Something is going on oldman. Question is what.

    This all started with the Arduino. It has been picking up pace.

    –In that context the personal desktop, toy that it was in the beginning, was a godsend that developed quite rapidly.–

    We are now seeing the same thing in proto boards. 6 months down the track from the Rasbery Pi you are seeing something that has quad the ram and over doubled the performance.

    oldman
    –And nobody will give a crap. I past experience is any guide these systems will simply go nowhere except possibly as microcontrollers.–

    If no one was giving a crap we would not be seeing the sales numbers that are happening. 800 000 premade units cannot go to the device development market. They never need that many. Because they start producing there own boards after they have had a good look at the reference.

    Same thing has been happening with Arduino but due to its limited abilities does not have as many markets. There have been more Arduino devices produced than the device development market needs.

    So these devices are going into homes and education. Not business yet. Same way PC entered.

    oldman remember none of the major OS makers gave a crap about the PC this gave MS the foot hold selling basic that lead to MS DOS.

    We are seeing a new neglected section of market appear. This always opens the door to new OS’s getting in the mix.

  20. “The Raspberry PI changes a lot because they are so small.”

    Only the board is small. You still need a monitor and keyboard which are generally much bigger than compact laptops. I mean, laptops are designed to sit on your lap so regardless of how small the desk is, it can still house a laptop. Any lecture hall in university will prove that; They have tiny folding trays for desks and everyone can fit their laptops on them.

    Additionally, laptops have mouse input built in, a battery built in and the mouse and keyboard don’t occupy the USB slots so plugging in an external hard drive isn’t a problem. Even if you had a battery running the board, you’d drain it trying to run a desktop monitor off it.

    So while the price of the board is fetching, it isn’t the complete solution. There’s a reason laptops cost more; They have all the components integrated already and are truly portable.

  21. oldman wrote, “I am more concerned with helping students”.

    In that case, answer the question, “Are students better off having no computer or the Raspberry PI?”.

    That’s the choice in the real world. Classrooms are too small for desktop PCs and even notebooks are too big. Classrooms have lots of bodies, desks and tend to be square with little storage space/workspace at the sides. There exist classrooms built in the 1950s today which antedate anything but pencils and books and the occasional projector. I have taught in rooms with only 4 duplex receptacles, one on each wall. They cannot all be turned into labs. The Raspberry PI changes a lot because they are so small. The netbooks was pretty good for that purpose but cost a lot more. I have been told by directors of education that they would not have even one PC in a classroom despite the specified curriculum. Small cheap computers have a big role.

    The lab is most schools’ answer to this problem and it is a poor solution requiring scheduling or random access. Both restrict what educators and students can do with them. Small cheap computers and mobile gadgets change all that. Many schools have carts with netbooks come to classrooms but it is far better to have the hardware accessible when it’s needed rather than on schedule. IT should be usable just like pencils and paper, as needed.

  22. oldman says:

    oldman revises history a bit when he wrote, “You forget that in 1975 there was no such thing as a personal desktop computer. “

    No history was revised Pog. I just miscalculated on your ability to understand the context of the comment. I therefore revise my statement as follows:

    You forget that up until 1975 there was no such thing as a personal desktop computer.

    Does this make my intent clearer, Pog?

    “Before that were things like the minicomputers and terminals that had similar functions. No one cared whether the computer was down the hall or across campus if they could make things happen from where they were. God, those TeleTypes were noisy.”

    Minicomputers in the 70’s were big expensive and shared resources. Unless you were one of the privileged, you got to sign up for you limited amount of time at the computer and wait your turn. If you couldn’t perform your task in the time alotted, you were SOL – you got to vacate your seat and make room for the next poor schmuck who needed access to the computer.

    In that context the personal desktop, toy that it was in the beginning, was a godsend that developed quite rapidly. By 1978 I was using wordstar to edit the drafts of my school papers and sson after (1979) writing in Z80 assembler and MICROSOFT Fortran-80 on a Northstar horizon. I was able to get so much of my work done on this little “toy” computer that none of the mini or mainframe bigots wanted to touch that I cut my need for computer time in half.

    Flash forward 34 years Pog and we have an entirely different situation. There is IMHO zero reason to be giving little crappy computers like RPi to anyone as their first computer unless they are interested in developing for embedded systems or want to or are able to tinker. IMHO A more meaning learning experience can be had by teaching programming using the desktop resources that are available now.

    But then again I am more concerned with helping students, not with sticking it to microsoft as you seem to be.

  23. oldman revises history a bit when he wrote, “You forget that in 1975 there was no such thing as a personal desktop computer. “

    That’s not so. The Intel microprocessors immediately changed that. Altair 8800 and a bunch of others appeared in 1975. Further, all the components were available off-the-shelf so individuals were making desktop PCs one way or another.

    Before that were things like the minicomputers and terminals that had similar functions. No one cared whether the computer was down the hall or across campus if they could make things happen from where they were. God, those TeleTypes were noisy.

  24. oldman wrote, as 11, “I past experience is any guide these systems will simply go nowhere except possibly as microcontrollers.”

    These things are affordable and accessible by schools, particularly in labs for computer science/robotics/electronics. They teach way more than reading/writing/’rithmetic in schools these days. They are also affordable and accessible for geekish kids. Parents will love to give these as gifts or to keep kids off the web/TV a bit. Unlike ancient single-board computers, these have standard connectors for USB and video and can run modest distros which open up all kinds of possibilities. There are a ton of software and tools for them. Expect them to turn up in science/technology fairs, schools and homes in the millions. Expect a whole generation of young people to be familiar with GNU/Linux and Android/Linux as a result of such small cheap computers. They accelerate the decline of the monopoly a lot. These will be consumers who go into retail stores and tell salesmen that they are selling the wrong stuff. I expect my grand daughter will receive one of these within a year or two. She already can run Android/Linux and she’s only 3.

    For your information, education is big business. The world has ~7 billion people of which more than 1billion are school age. It’s a huge market. Schools everywhere have skimped on IT. They can spend a little and get a lot with small cheap computers. The lack of moving parts is particularly appealing. They just won’t quit. Unlike consumers who keep wanting the next best thing, students at a young age pass through an age where any IT at all is absolutely wonderful because they all go through the same basic needs to understand and to try stuff so these gadgets will have long lifespans again killing M$’s cash cows. I still have a working Ohio Scientific SuperBoard II which I might donate to my grand daughter for her collection of toys. It cost $400 and could do nothing but BASIC and assembler with only audio and video connectors. 8KB RAM, too. I used it for years anyway. Imagine what the new small cheap computers can do in comparison. Small things can change the world.

  25. Clarence Moon, defying logic, wrote, “The only statistic in existence is the web counts which are a direct measure of usage in some sort of general environment. Whether those statistics can be accurate projected to other environments is indeed a valid question, but there is nothing at all that suggests that Linux is a major factor in Asia or anywhere else in terms of desktop PC commerce.”

    Don’t you think that people need to actually sell stuff to stay in business selling GNU/Linux? People are doing that in China, Malaysia, India, Brazil, etc. A lot of the suppliers started from nothing years ago and are thriving. Check out Positivo in Brazil:

  26. notebooks
  27. desktops
  28. growth
  29. They also ship that other OS, but are not shy to advertise GNU/Linux on their site unlike other OEMs and they are shipping GNU/Linux in bulk, even supplying one laptop per child in schools in Brazil. Walmart sells Positivo machines and GNU/Linux are the best-sellers.