WOW! Computer for Seniors

I remember recently there was an article about businesses being shy of mentioning their products run on GNU/Linux. SJVN has found a counterexample, a business that makes a fine product which is not shy to shout that it runs on GNU/Linux:

“Does the WOW! Computer run on Windows?
No. The WOW! Computer runs on a Linux operating system we’ve customized to support our touch screen capabilities. We chose Linux to avoid frequent problems with viruses and to provide a more secure, problem-free computer environment. Linux has been developed over the last 20 years by numerous companies and currently runs on millions of computers. In fact, about 60% of all internet servers run Linux.”

In fact, the company is so proud of their product they sell it at a premium price. That is justifiable because of the huge touch-screen, the freedom from worry about software updated and viruses and the great ease of use. It’s still a small computer, though, an all-in-one. No big box at all, and with fewer cables.

see Tech Specs – WOW! Computer for Seniors – by firstSTREET.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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44 Responses to WOW! Computer for Seniors

  1. oiaohm says:

    Chris Weig
    http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/Boeing-787-Dreamliner-s-entertainment-system-powered-by-Android-1637590.html

    Its a little too late first class is going to see android as status normal. The battle using Android is very multi front. Larger and more spread assault pattern than what most think.

  2. oiaohm says:

    Chris Weig
    “Perhaps. But they’ll remain niche products. With any luck some of them will be sustainable. But the kind of market of old, where several systems could economically co-exist, simply doesn’t exist today. The convergence to — in this case — Wintel was logical. Because more diversity brings with it always higher complexity and higher costs. Business will have none of it.”
    Wintel is more expensive than ARM. Business is already using Android tablets and Ipads.

    Too late to worry about that higher complexity crud stuff that is already here.

    But they’ll remain niche products. The niche product claim is too late look at india. Lot of 100-200 dollar devices being used with terminal servers.

    The volume already ship says that niche claim is bull crap.

    How can you justify have a cost per seat as high as wintel. You cannot. 100 dollar per seat is the new line coming. What ever cannot make that doomed.

    Several systems could not co-exist in the old age either. The most expensive to get the job done will die.

    Wintel will be pushed into the server room. Where more value per seat can be achieved. The client machines will migrate to the 100 dollar per seat and its all about costs.

    “several systems could economically co-exist”
    Only happened in one particular point of time when they were all running the same OS.

    In fact in windows machines this still exists today.

    Android has opened up a new layer of hardware that can Co-exist. The 100 dollar range. Before Dos there was MS basic that allowed a range of hardware to Co-exist.

    Basically Co-exist requires commonality in OS in some form.

  3. Chris Weig says:

    This is the problem in the 100 dollar range we are going to see all the microcomputers fun forms come back.

    Perhaps. But they’ll remain niche products. With any luck some of them will be sustainable. But the kind of market of old, where several systems could economically co-exist, simply doesn’t exist today. The convergence to — in this case — Wintel was logical. Because more diversity brings with it always higher complexity and higher costs. Business will have none of it.

  4. oiaohm says:

    Chris Weig by the way general computing concepts were fully developed before the PC even happened in the first place.

  5. oiaohm says:

    Chris Weig
    “Except that there’s no need to repeat history. Because the general computing concepts are reasonably well developed and established. A computer like the Raspberry Pi in its current state is pretty much unacceptable, and that’s so because people already know computers.”

    There is a reason to repeat history. Same problem less developed countries x86 machines are not affordable. Exactly the same reason the PC happened in the first place is still here today. People could not afford a Minicomputer at home so the PC happened in the first place. There are still people who cannot afford a Minicomputer at home.

    Not everywhere knows computers yet Chris Weig. Out of the worlds population be truthful how many know computers.

    As a robot control board Raspberry PI is many times better than the lego controller computer and other training computers too.

    Just like the first time around the next generations of devices after the raspberry pi will be many times more powerful in the same price bracket.

    Chris Weig basically after all these years the same problem exists today as when the PC was first born. We are now seeing that need be serviced. Note I said need not want.

    Chris Weig saying no need for a history repeat is you really trying to put your head in the sand. You could say the uoya game console lines up with the c64 of old. C64 was one of the most popular microcomputers of all time.

    This is the problem in the 100 dollar range we are going to see all the microcomputers fun forms come back.

    Chris Weig the hardest thing for a lot of people to see is nothing has really changed. The haves are still the haves and the have nots are still the have nots. So while have nots exist there is always a requirement to get cheaper.

    The result of the history repeat is doomsday for Microsoft or massive drop in profitability.

    The Raspberry PI is far less unacceptable than the 10 dollar computer. Yes Chris Weig there is such thing as a 10 dollar computer. When we get to a 100 dollars the next force will be down to 10.

    As 100 dollar computers become more able so will 10 dollar computers. Real question is how much computer power do you really need.

  6. Chris Weig says:

    Chris Weig raspberry pi is about as crappy as the first PCs. Todo anything productive with the first PC using multi tasking you would use them as a thin terminal client to a server. Of course text based clients back then. Raspberry pi is powerful enough to run thin terminal software. This is why this is so much of a history repeat. Usage of the hardware is the same.

    Except that there’s no need to repeat history. Because the general computing concepts are reasonably well developed and established. A computer like the Raspberry Pi in its current state is pretty much unacceptable, and that’s so because people already know computers.

  7. oiaohm says:

    oldman
    “Your are BTW doing a very good imitation of the kind of arrogant bigoted big iron geek that used to laugh at my use of the “toys”. A decade later they weren’t laughing.”
    The funny part is you don’t get it. You lived it but you don’t get it. Rose coloured glasses have got your really well.

    “Amdahl 470/VS” Was not a Microcomputer it was Minicomputer.

    You usage has been displaced. Todays PC is not really a microcomputer either. PC configuration today is Minicomputer. Raspberry PI the start of the return of the Microcomputer.

    CP/M mostly only found on the Minicomputers. Got displaced by its poorer clone on the Microcomputers being MS Dos then those Microcomputers were displaced by Minicomputers running Dos and Windows.

    I am seeing the market break the same way it did before. Mini computers become a no mans land between Microcomputers and Big iron again.

    Chris Weig raspberry pi is about as crappy as the first PCs. Todo anything productive with the first PC using multi tasking you would use them as a thin terminal client to a server. Of course text based clients back then. Raspberry pi is powerful enough to run thin terminal software. This is why this is so much of a history repeat. Usage of the hardware is the same.

    “micro computer (1978-date).” Your last date is wrong Oldman. Key thing about early micro computers was the fact of the ram and other parts soldered on where most Minicomputers had ram and the like socketed for means to upgrade.

    Because between 1978-current day we change back from Microcomputer configuration to Minicomputer configuration. This change back happened in the attack of the MS Dos clones. Exact date is not clearly define of the change.

    Mobile phones, raspberry pi and others is the return of the true microcomputers.

    This is a true history repeat in more ways than one oldman. You are making the same jokes about the Microcomputer as people using Minicomputers did. Yes oldman you are repeated your old mistake.

    The fact is you are calling stuff Microcomputer that is not.

    The current PC in-front of you is not a Microcomputer it is the define of a Minicomputer. The mobile phone in your pocket is a Microcomputer.

    History is important to know so you know when the changes happened. You lived history and you missed the changes. Its about time you go back and review history with clear eyes.

    Oldman this is a full blown repeat. Microsoft is now sitting where CP/M was in the age of Mini computers. Yes this makes sense since today’s PC hardware is Minicomputers not Microcomputers. Android is now sitting where Microsoft was setting in the same Age again this makes perfect sense early on in the age of PC it was Basic as OS on the PC. GNU/Linux is the fragmentation in the Microcomputer market that existed.

    Yes Microsoft going spat on Mobile phones is a History repeat of Digital behind CP/M trying to release DR Dos on the PC. Of course Digital attempted many times before failing. So we can expect Microsoft todo the same thing. Digital even released it own hardware to try to keep CP/M and DR Dos a float. Yes Microsoft Surface tablet is part of the repeat.

    The repeat markers are really solid Oldman. The new microcomputers are going to be Sub 100 dollar stuff. Just like early microcomputers not upgradeable hardware wise. Also just like the early microcomputers going to be called toys by people like you oldman who cannot see what they are and the problem they are going to apply to the market.

  8. Chris Weig wrote, “That sounds even worse than one assumed it to be.”

    Yet, it is quite usable for browsing as demonstrated in TFA. Here’s another example.

  9. Chris Weig says:

    Raspberry Pi tested by German tech site Golem.de

    Excerpt:

    Working on the Raspberry Pi with a graphical desktop is anything but speedy. Even the moving of windows puts such a load on CPU and GPU which often renders the small computer unusable for minutes. Thus multitasking is pretty much out of the question. And that’s so despite the not very resource-intensive desktop LXDE being installed on Debian Wheezy, which the user starts with startx.

    Good God! That sounds even worse than one assumed it to be.

  10. JR says:

    @ oldman
    Just as a matter of interest do you remember the Sharp PC3201 which ran cp/m.
    I had one which I purchased in 1982.
    It had dual 5 1/4 floppy drives.
    64k ram which I upgraded with 48k
    I used an accounting program,database and spreadsheet program.
    Anyway just curious.

  11. oldman says:

    “I am a history buff. Particularly area of interest computer history and development.

    SO I guess the means you never actually never used a mainframe (I did from 1978-82) or a mini computer (1979-2004) or even a micro computer (1978-date).

    I was using a northstar horizon equipped with a terminal running CP/M 2.2 in 1979 to edit (using edit-80) and compile fortran programs using fortran-80. I was doing my iirst assembler programs. THat northstar may ghave had only a fraction of the power of the Amdahl 470/VS that I was submitting batch jobs on, but it allowed me to actually get work done while others were awaiting their turn at the terminal because it was mine exclusively to use. I got useful work done while the mainframe bigots of the day got to wait their turn inline.

    Your are BTW doing a very good imitation of the kind of arrogant bigoted big iron geek that used to laugh at my use of the “toys”. A decade later they weren’t laughing.

  12. JR says:

    @ Robert Pogson
    Robert I can only but admire your patience in trying to explain a concept such as the raspberry pi to people who either do not want to know or do not have the comprehension to understand what the raspberry pi is all about.
    I often wonder why you even bother.

  13. JR says:

    @ Phenom
    Define the following for me “And no software except for a lousy office package, a browser, a mediocre e-mail client, and a myriad of half-assed media players…”

  14. oiaohm says:

    oldman
    “But the first PC’s represented something truly new. The Rasberry PI is a geek toy that is coming out in a fully developed market with a myriad of solutions that are far more useful than this piece of sh-t.

    IMHO Putting a full linus distro in a flash drive on a white box pc is more useful as a teaching tool than this crap.”
    What is your mind degrading. Nothing about the PC was new.

    PC’s were geek toys. The were crap compared to what businesses were using in business. IBM made there PC as a joke side line thinking it would never sell because the Minicomputers they were producing at the time was many times more functional.

    First pc machines lights and switches. While the business machines had keyboards screens mice and were mainframes and minicomputers.

    “myriad of solutions” There was also a myriad of solutions at the start of the PC. The issue was that they were too expensive for what the market required to grow.

    The first PC was cheap crap. You have forgot apparently or you are not really the oldman here. I am a history buff. Particularly area of interest computer history and development.

    Of course oldman you have forgot the Minicomputers that the micro computers displaced.

    So yes there was stuff like the microcomputers around. They were the Minicomputers larger and more expensive. Could perform the same tasks faster than the first generations of microcomputers.

    Sub 100 dollar machines are the new microcomputers competitors. Exactly like microcomputer vs minicomputers the sub 100 are currently less functional.

    Also you are forgetting Xerox Alto computer and the X11 releations. That predates the PC. Was designed for single user had screen, keyboard and mouse. This is the true birth of graphical interfaces in 1973. Takes the PC until the late 1980 to start showing what the Alto had.

    The PC was not revolutionary other than is price.

    The first PC’s were complete junk. Heck some you had to assemble yourself. People forget apple II came assembled but the first apple computer was assemble yourself. Even solder the parts yourself to the circuit board.

    With raspberry pi we are seeing a full circle. Prototyping nature of the first PC’s coming back again.

    White box pc is more expensive than a raspberry pi. White box pc is too large to place on a remote control car.

    This is the thing oldman you don’t know your history you think a microcomputer is revolutionary you have been reading some books written by some stupid authors. Some do say why PC was revolutionary clearly. It was a cheap computer people could afford to have at home. That is all that was special about the PC and that is what made it revolutionary.

  15. oldman wrote, “The Rasberry Pi is a geek toy that is coming out in a fully developed market with a myriad of solutions that are far more useful than this piece of sh-t.”

    The connectivity of the device is pretty good. One can stick a huge monitor, a Fujitsu keyboard designed for Lose ’95 and a heavy-duty optical mouse on it. So, all else is software. The hardware just does what it is told. It could use more RAM and a somewhat more powerful CPU but it is very useful as is with Debian GNU/Linux able to run on it. It does take a bit of time to open an application but it uses so little power that one can leave that application loaded 24×7 for very little cost.

    The Pi is designed to be a low-cost entry point into IT for young/poor people. For them it is ideal because of the price. It would have to be $0 to be much better for them. Many of those folks will start with “Hello, World!” in some language or another and they may graduate to fairly useful software without stressing the device at all. I would have found no problem using it in my Computer Science classes or computer programming classes. Many schools have only one computer lab and it is fully booked because the “Computer” teacher may be in there all day or half the day. Doing some of the computer courses in a regular classroom with the Pi would be a boon to those schools. It’s not shit. It’s a computer that blows away what most people were using just a decade ago. Computer science 101 is a classical course. Nothing much has to be state-of-the-art to get a lot of teaching/learning done.

  16. oldman says:

    “Exactly same thing was said about the first PC’s. They had worse interfaces than the rasbery pi. Yes the very first PC only had toggle switches and leds.”

    But the first PC’s represented something truly new. The Rasberry PI is a geek toy that is coming out in a fully developed market with a myriad of solutions that are far more useful than this piece of sh-t.

    IMHO Putting a full linus distro in a flash drive on a white box pc is more useful as a teaching tool than this crap.

  17. oldman says:

    “Exactly same thing was said about the first PC’s. They had worse interfaces than the rasbery pi. Yes the very first PC only had toggle switches and leds..”

    When the first microcomputers were created 30+ years ago, nothing like them existed. Now you have an entire ecosystem of hardware and software solutions which work for people across the entire spectrum of interests.

    Its a different world now.

  18. oiaohm says:

    Phenom
    “What for? This device is good only for enthusiast wanna-be-developers.”
    Exactly same thing was said about the first PC’s. They had worse interfaces than the rasbery pi. Yes the very first PC only had toggle switches and leds.

    Step back and think for a moment and see problem.

    1 million dollars is the magic figure to develop any device and bring it to market Phenom.

    So just because the devices that have been produces do far might seam toy. To make a laptop design from nothing to production is also 1 million dollars.

    Foss has now proved it can raise the required capital to bring its own devices to market.

  19. Phenom says:

    “The FOSS people will buy. At the right price buy in huge volumes.”

    What for? This device is good only for enthusiast wanna-be-developers.

  20. oiaohm says:

    PS raspberry PI Shock horror is taking up basically the 1 million units a year alone that was allocated for its cpu chip. The FOSS people will buy. At the right price buy in huge volumes.

  21. oiaohm says:

    http://venturebeat.com/2012/07/04/99-dollar-android-game-console-ouya/

    oldman locked fileformats and other things is why for a long time Linux and Unix did not believe it had a chance on the desktop.

    “And that new market is already showing signs of being as commercial and proprietary as the existing one.”

    Problem is items like ouya at 100 dollars shows signs of not following that model. The device is going to contain no locks to prevent modification.

    Welcome to the new age. Microsoft has gone to hardware lock like Apple and Unix did now a new set of low end flexible devices is appearing.

    Basically Linux next target is your house. Getting your TV and other times will displace some PC usage. Also put downward pressure on console games.

    Get use to it oldman 100 dollar machines that can surf the net everywhere is coming. These will able to be thin terminals for a lot of roles. Also able to do basics like writing emails and basic word processing.

    2013 is going to be a really interesting year for everything in low end hardware planned.

    Chris Weig you are really not understanding what is happening. Android being free and runs a lot of applications allows items like the ouya to be entered into the market.

    “The capitalists have managed to swallow FLOSS whole.” Capitalists have not managed this at all.

    Open Spec allows other markets to enter the market and use the same applications as there competitors. Android market is highly dynamic with battles between Capitalists and non Capitalists. Or in the case of ouya a game developer who wants a console they don’t have to pay the earth to have development kits for. 2 million dollars was raised to fund development only 1 million was required to be able to bring a device like that to market.

    This is the big problem FOSS world is now at the point where it can raise enough money to bring its own devices to market. Population of FOSS users is large enough to provide the required capital.

    Expect to see more devices FOSS design and produced.

  22. oldman wrote on the OS wars:“You have to provide a BETTER product that is cheaper, and as you have acknowledges multiple times, linux is still “getting there””

    Those are beliefs not facts. If GNU/Linux were on retail shelves marked at lower prices on the same hardware, lots of consumers would buy them. That’s a fact proven in regions where GNU/Linux is on retail shelves. Price matters. For many purposes price may be the determining factor in a sale. There are consumers who assume the highest price product is better but there are also consumers who assume if it’s on a retail shelf, the lowest price is for a product that’s good enough. GNU/Linux has been superior to that other OS in my experience since 2000 because I have used both on the same hardware and could quantitatively evaluate the performance. So, GNU/Linux is “there”.

  23. oldman wrote, of mobile stuff, “90% of those devices represent a new market, not a replacement of an old one. The old market may be heading towards niche status, but is is not going anywhere soon.”

    I seem to recall that’s exactly what people said of the notebook PC. Now, many people use notebooks as workstations even if they never want to be mobile… Now most PCs are notebooks. If you include all the smart things, virtually all PCs in production are mobile. The installed base/inventory of desktop-only PCs is slowly declining because new ones are being produced at lower rates than old ones are being taken out of service.

    The desktop-only PC is rapidly becoming archaic. It’s unnecessarily large, expensive, noisy, and one has to pay for permission to use them if you use M$’s software on it.

    A lot of people treat desktop-only PCs as becoming a niche but that’s not quite right. They will become one of many forms of IT that have an appropriate place. Unlike M$’s plan, they will become other than the keystone of a monopoly. It’s M$ that is going into a niche to survive, not any PC. While M$ may cling to its niche as long as possible the world is moving with the current and ISVs who now cater to M$ will also diversify. The applications that oldman feels are the key will be available to anyone with a computer not just a computer running M$’s stuff. Will a few applications stick with M$? Yes, until they too read the writing on the wall.

  24. Chris Weig wrote, “The capitalists have managed to swallow FLOSS whole.”

    FLOSS is not restricted to poor people. Anyone can use FLOSS with no limitations. See, e.g. Debian’s social contract:
    “No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups

    The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons.”

    This not a bug but a feature.

  25. Chris Weig says:

    So you can crow all you want about microsoft being on the outs. It will just be replaced with Google.

    And you will have another ebil corporation to bitch about.

    Google is their friend. They would never lose faith in those con artists.

    What they can’t wrap their head around is this: you have thousands of things powered by FLOSS, yet you are getting less and less free. The capitalists have managed to swallow FLOSS whole.

  26. oldman says:

    “This year about 68% of new devices are mobiles and only about 32% non-mobiles (desktops, laptops, notebooks). ”

    And 90% of those devices represent a new market, not a replacement of an old one. The old market may be heading towards niche status, but is is not going anywhere soon.

    And that new market is already showing signs of being as commercial and proprietary as the existing one.

    So you can crow all you want about microsoft being on the outs. It will just be replaced with Google.

    And you will have another ebil corporation to bitch about.

  27. oldman says:

    “But in a fight you are sure of a fair competition.”

    Says Who? The competition is not just having a cheap product. You have to provide a BETTER product that is cheaper, and as you have acknowledges multiple times, linux is still “getting there”

    And by better I mean having desktop applications that are superior to those available on windows platform.

  28. Mats Hagglund says:

    “Microsoft is the defending champion…”

    Microsoft was perhaps once the “defending champion”. During the last 12 years it has however lost servers, supercomputers, smartphones, tablets, ARM-devices. It has lost a slice of 10% of pc-client markets to rivals Apple and Linux too.

    More important than these details is the loss of pc generally for Micro$oft. This year about 68% of new devices are mobiles and only about 32% non-mobiles (desktops, laptops, notebooks). Erosion is huge.

    Here are the cruel truths for M$:

    -only some 55% of new pc’s are installed with Windows-license.

    -only some 3-4% of mobiles are installed with any Windows

    -Mobiles vs. non-mobiles = 68-32

    Let’s say it clear: Microsoft licenses will have about 20% of new devices in 2012. Microsoft – hardly a champion at all.

  29. oiaohm says:

    Chris Weig
    “YOU are the contenders, Microsoft is the defending champion. YOU have to do the work!”
    But in a fight you are sure of a fair competition.

    Microsoft did a lot we will give your shop advertising money if the only thing you will stock is our stuff.

    Linux in places where its getting a fair fight is doing reasonably well. Windows 7 Starter limited the amount of ram that could be fitted. This lead to a miss balance that still exists.

    Really OS maker should not be able to define hardware limits other than maybe the number of cpu cores. Also MS defined small screen as a netbook. Lot of early Linux netbooks have been relabeled notebooks because there screen is too large.

    Yes MS move was perfect. Android is a new way in.

    I really don’t think MS would like if the Linux world was able to redefine what there products were called.

  30. Chris Weig says:

    Ordinary folks when finding GNU/Linux on retail shelves do buy it. In USA/Canada/Europe, most retail shelves do not offer the choice. Consumers in some places are misinformed by M$’s partners about what is available.

    The industry is the industry. It will do what it takes to make money. That worked with Android. It worked and works with Windows.

    But you really should adjust your perspective, because it’s an ideologues distorted perspective that is deliberately taking the very narrow view that consumers in fact can’t influence the industry. And that’s simply not true. If you want Linux on the shelves, more people have to decide against Windows and let the industry know. As long as people buy Windows PCs, only to delete it afterwards and install Linux, nothing will change.

    YOU are the contenders, Microsoft is the defending champion. YOU have to do the work!

  31. kozmcrae says:

    Phenom wrote:

    “They claim those who choose Windows or Macs and who are 99% of world’s PC users are misinformed and misguided half-wits.”

    Like it’s still 1995.

  32. Mats Hagglund says:

    People don’t choose Windows. And people of USSR didn’t choose Lada. They were forced to choose between Lada and Moskovits.

  33. Phenom says:

    In USA/Canada/Europe, most retail shelves do not offer the choice

    They tried a few times, and declared it a total loss. Last time it was with netbooks.

  34. Phenom wrote, “They claim those who choose Windows or Macs and who are 99% of world’s PC users are misinformed and misguided half-wits.”

    Ordinary folks when finding GNU/Linux on retail shelves do buy it. In USA/Canada/Europe, most retail shelves do not offer the choice. Consumers in some places are misinformed by M$’s partners about what is available.

  35. oiaohm says:

    Phenom to be correct a lot are miss guided and do stupid things like downloading pirated software and other things.

    So there is a serous question how many are making a real selection. The I don’t think choice is currently Windows.

  36. Phenom says:

    “Everybody have to make own decision which OS and platform he/she prefers”

    Absolutely. Somehow Mr. Pogson and his cronies are denying other’s right to make their own decision. They claim those who choose Windows or Macs and who are 99% of world’s PC users are misinformed and misguided half-wits.

  37. Mats Hagglund says:

    Everybody have to make own decision which OS and platform he/she prefers. I used Windows 1994-2008 and that 14 years period was long enough to assure that Windows ecosystem is just pure waste of money, waste of time and waste of peace of mind. During the last 4 years i’ve been happy to use stable, secure and good OS of GNU/Linux and free good software.

  38. Phenom says:

    “…no euros for any software …”

    And no software except for a lousy office package, a browser, a mediocre e-mail client, and a myriad of half-assed media players…

    It is difficult to explain a color-blind the beauty of colors.

  39. Mats Hagglund says:

    http://aleutia.com/d2-dual-core-mini-atom-pc

    Here’s one example what’s the price of Linux, installing it by yourself and price of Windows 7 Home/Pro.

    You can easily save more than 100 € by avoiding Windows + no AV software + no euros for any software + no viruses, trojans, malware…

  40. Chris Weig wrote, “Selling PCs with Windows 7 is bad due to evil, evil “Microsoft Tax”. Computers could be SO MUCH cheaper, if it were not for the evil, evil “Microsoft Tax”.”

    That other OS is not evil just because of the tax. The bundling of the tax so the average consumer is unaware how much he is paying for the restrictions of his hardware, the re-re-reboots, the phoning home etc. is evil. Why are M$ and “partners” afraid to compete on price/performance? What would happen if retailers showed a certain hardware configuration selling with GNU/Linux for price $X and that other OS for price $Y? Of course, more PCs with GNU/Linux would sell and fewer with that other OS. Perhaps a lot fewer. Consumers who cared about price/performance would give GNU/Linux a try and a good percentage of consumers would find they like it and M$ would have to accept lower revenue or raise prices to maintain revenue.

    So, it is elimination of choice in the market place, not the price that makes M$ evil. They can charge $1million per licence for all I care. That would just help rid the world of them sooner. I expect their price would drop to ~$20 or less if they allowed competition and small cheap computers would be free of M$.

  41. Chris Weig says:

    The evasion principle, part 1234. Today:

    Selling PCs with Windows 7 is bad due to evil, evil “Microsoft Tax”. Computers could be SO MUCH cheaper, if it were not for the evil, evil “Microsoft Tax”.

    Selling massively overpriced PCs with a custom GNU/Linux that is severely crippled and limited is good due to it being GNU/Linux.

    Circular arguments are good, too. That reminds me of Georg Büchner’s “Woyzeck”, where one character, the Hauptmann, says: “Moral, das ist, wenn man moralisch ist, versteht Er.” (“Moral, that’s when you’re moralistic, understand he.”) Would Büchner live today, it’d then go like this: “GNU/Linux, it’s good, because it’s GNU/Linux, understand he.”

  42. Chris Weig says:

    Is this a scam? This is an MSI Wind Top AE2050, which retails for as low as 500 Euros (about 614 USD) in Germany. And as this price includes a Windows 7 license, you can bet that Venture 3, the maker of this abomination, gets such a computer for as low as 500 USD from MSI.

    And now let’s cut the bull. The only — THE ONLY — reason why you endorse this computer and even go so far as to justify the premium price it’s sold at is — Linux.

    But there’s just the tiniest bit of a problem there. The OS is built on Tiny Core Linux, but the user software on top of it is apparently all developed by Venture 3 themselves. So they don’t use the good software from the FLOSS ecosystem, and that way they deliberately open huge holes for security flaws to get through.

    So this computer is:

    1.) massively overpriced and
    2.) goes directly against your principles.

    Go figure.

  43. Clarence Moon says:

    “Can I add my own software to this computer?”

    “No.”

    Just another entrepreneur trying to take a bite out of the old folks at a minimum cost and a maximum profit, Mr. Pogson. You should be ashamed of associating with them!

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