Samsung: New Chrome OS Desktop and Notebook

If anything indicated GNU/Linux is mainstream, Samsung releasing a product based on GNU/Linux for desktop and notebook is. The ChromeOS devices are great for people needing mobility or less clutter on desks who mainly use web/cloud apps. As such, a large fraction of consumers or business-users could fit. The price is not cheap but at least the products are small.

A lot of people use PCs differently than they did just a decade ago. Think FaceBook… I know people who spend hours on a single site all day long and only use local resources to upload images. A Chromebook would work for them. A lot of businesses have staff who deal with a single web application all day long. A Chromebook would work for them. I expect Samsung is convinced there is a market and will do the right promotion to stimulate it. That will get GNU/Linux on more retail shelves which is a good thing.

see Samsung refreshes ChromeOS hardware with first desktop system • The Register.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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15 Responses to Samsung: New Chrome OS Desktop and Notebook

  1. oiaohm says:

    Viktor http://www.h-online.com/security/features/FAQ-Flame-the-super-spy-1587063.html

    Anti-virus software is worthless in a lot of ways. You will not detect flame or other infections like it with anti-virus or malware software. You need Host Intrusion Detection Software. Known as HIDS.

    Viktor
    “One day you really need to stop ignoring the fact that the biggest OS market share brings with it increased risk.”

    Android and Windows are approaching the same market share. Rate live attacks per month against android has increased with market share growth. The import but is that its way less than Windows with no sign of ever matching it for infection rate or numbers of malware created per month. Even more important is the death rate to malware written for Android. Life span of Android malware appears to be 6 months compared to windows 2 to 3 years.

    So really you will have to soon drop that as a counter argument. Also android is not example of great secuirty but its better than what windows provides.

    Yes Windows issue is part market share. I give that. For a long time there has been clues that its not market share alone. Server infections with Linux dominating most of the market yet windows infected most. The Linux infection rate remains low. This is part because Linux normally does not use Anti-virus software that is signature dependant of known threats. But uses HIDS that works the other way. We know what should be on the system and anything that should not be there is a possible problem.

    HIDS can detect unknowns. Like 90+ percent of all documents don’t need or contain macros. HIDS response is you see something like that you isolate it and ask it maker if its valid.

    Yes the defective by design is true Viktor. Problem is defective by design also applies to Anti-virus software.

  2. Viktor says:

    If I have to run anti-virus software on it to keep it safe, I am wasting IT resources protecting defective-by-design software.

    I don’t run anti-virus-software, and yet I don’t have viruses. Or malware. Or whatever.

    “Defective-by-design”? Nonsense. One day you really need to stop ignoring the fact that the biggest OS market share brings with it increased risk. Do you really think that malware and virus authors will stop writing these things if only Linux became the dominant OS?

    The argument brought fourth again and again by Linux evangelists like yourself is like saying that you can’t have a car accident because you go by foot.

  3. oiaohm says:

    Chromebooks stuff I don’t really Like.

    Its the fact your data is stored on a cloud server you don’t truly control.

    Samsung is exploring options. A private internal business/school option I could see these devices taking off. Who will steal a class room laptop from a school what stops working when its not connected to the school network. Same with workshop floor devices. Thief normally will not steal what will fail.

    Idea of chromebooks is good implementation is bad. The idea has a place just not in the form google has done.

    Really I would have liked to see android laptop.

  4. oldman says:

    “I would never call anything with M$’s software on it “fully functional”. If I have to run anti-virus software on it to keep it safe, I am wasting IT resources protecting defective-by-design software.”

    I frankly could care less what you call them Pog. We know what your bigotries are in that area. The fact remains that very few people who once they understand the issues, would choose a chromebook over a full function x86-64 portable, regardless of what OS and software it would ruun.

  5. oldman wrote, “fully functional wintel”. I would never call anything with M$’s software on it “fully functional”. If I have to run anti-virus software on it to keep it safe, I am wasting IT resources protecting defective-by-design software.

    I drive a Lexus, because that’s what the “little woman” wanted. I wanted a VW Jetta TDI diesel…

  6. oldman says:

    “People should use what works for the task and at the lowest cost.”

    Just because you wish to play Cheap Jack Charlie does not mean that everyone else has to Robert Pogson. The fact remains that it is stupid to pay the same amount of money for the likes of a chromebook when I can get a fully functional wintel computer for the same price.

    And BTW it does not necessarily have to run Windows either if thats what I truly want.

    And even running Linux with all its limitations, it would STILL be worth far more than the high priced glorified dumb terminal Google is hawking.

    And BTW I drive a 1999 Mercury Grand Marquis GS to work not an Abrahms tank. Unlike youself I couldn’t afford a Prius.

  7. oldman says:

    “Just because you haven’t yet lost access to one or both of them or most likely never will doesn’t change that fact.”

    And if my aunt had balls she would be my uncle…

    Your point is meaningless.

  8. Viktor says:

    It’s the end of the month. Desperation and loonacy levels are sky-high at Pogson’s.

    Supporting Samsung by buying a machine with an OS by a “convicted monopolist” who is supposedly also the “man in the middle” is bad, regardless of the fact that you can get a more useful computer and — if you so want — replace Windows 7 with your favorite flavor of Linux.

    Supporting Samsung by buying a machine with an OS by a greedy company with an insane lust for users’ data and control over you and your computer via its cloud is good.

    Thankfully we got that cleared up.

    Insane hatred. That’s all the GNU/Linux evangelists here have left.

  9. kozmcrae says:

    @ldman wrote:

    “Total nonsense. I dont have one now Mr. K. My data is portable, and my hardware is properly sized and licensed for what I need to do.”

    Your hardware and data are essentially licensed from Microsoft when you agree to their EULA. Just because you haven’t yet lost access to one or both of them or most likely never will doesn’t change that fact.

  10. oldman wrote, “The fact remains that if I have to carry around a portable PC, I may as well have one that is as functional as possible.”

    So, you drive an Abrams tank to work because you will not accept alternatives? That’s silly. People should use what works for the task and at the lowest cost. That’s reasonable, proper and good for the world. No one benefits from waste.

  11. oldman says:

    “No, it doesn’t. For the same money you get less malware and independence from a convicted monopolist. That’s worth a lot.”

    Actually it does Pog. Most people could care less about the ancient crap that you insist on dragging out in an attempt to get people to move to your preferred platform. The fact remains that if I have to carry around a portable PC, I may as well have one that is as functional as possible.

    “You also don’t get a middle man between you and your hardware and data. ”

    Total nonsense. I dont have one now Mr. K. My data is portable, and my hardware is properly sized and licensed for what I need to do. The fact that I have to abide by the terms of my license is no more or no lesonerous tha the fact that you have to abide by the Terms of the GPL or whatever FOSS license comes with the software that you use.

  12. Ivan says:

    Thanks, I’ll be sure to pass that along to management next time the MRP/ERP software can’t update due to the network being down.

  13. kozmcrae says:

    Robert Pogson wrote:

    “For the same money you get less malware and independence from a convicted monopolist.”

    You also don’t get a middle man between you and your hardware and data. Once you “choose” Microsoft as your operating system you are disconnected from those two important pieces of your property. If push comes to shove, you have signed them both away to Microsoft in the EULA.

  14. Phenom wrote, “This sentence says it all.”

    No, it doesn’t. For the same money you get less malware and independence from a convicted monopolist. That’s worth a lot. Loss of Internet connectivity is not the end of the world. It’s cause for a coffee-break or perhaps some physical exercise.

  15. Phenom says:

    From the article: “For the same money as the 550 Chromebook Samsung will sell you a Pentium-powered 15.1 inch Windows 7 system that doesn’t need an internet connection to be useful.”

    This sentence says it all.

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