Thank You, M$, for Comic Relief

Certainly IT people take IT very seriously but every now and then someone comes along to lighten things up. Someone like Steven Sinofsky of M$ who stated unambiguously that, No third-party code on the Windows on ARM desktop means no plugins for Internet Explorer

Silent pause

But, but, it’s all about the applications. We all know that. The trolls convinced us. Users use applications, not the OS. We must have applications and M$ makes few of them…

HAHAHAHAHA!!! ROFL

The great “8” is going to be another locked-down “phoney 7″/Vista-like flop. Who, in their right mind, in this day and age of 100K apps for smart thingies, will buy a gadget that cannot compute in any way shape or form? This thing will fly like a Chromebook with an office suite…

Gasp. I need to breathe. Laughing is so hard at my age.

It turns out they will have “Metro”-style apps but not using the desktop. Still, it was a good laugh. Thanks, M$. All the developers who have put so much effort into making applications for the desktop of that other OS thank you too for excluding them from ARM. I am sure Google and Apple also had a great bit of relief that they don’t have to compete with 199K desktop apps that have run on that other OS for a decade. Meanwhile, GNU/Linux will run apps just fine one way or another on ARM. HAHAHA!

M$, you have locked yourself into your strange way of doing things and in the process you have locked the world out of continuing another step on the Wintel WOA! treadmill. 2012 will live in the annals of IT as the year M$ exploded a mine under its own OS. Why risk success when you can guarantee failure?

see also Ars – Windows 8 on ARM: the desktop is there, so’s Office, but not much more

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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10 Responses to Thank You, M$, for Comic Relief

  1. Flying Toaster says:

    Some apps that ran well on x86 do not work well with thin clients. For example, OpenOffice.org, at one stage had some file-locking/version problems.

    And you think any other instruction set architecture will auto-magically solve that problem? Maybe you should look up a bit on file locking in Linux before trying to imply such nonsense.

    Currently, Google’s Chrome browser insists on “smooth” scrolling (showing any slide or scroll as several screens) becomes “stuttering” scrolling on thin clients because of the slight network lag

    Now this just brings the word “schadenfreude” to a whole new level of meanings.

  2. Kozmcrae says:

    “Metro is an improved version of the same launch pad paradigm used by Apple and Android and is thus categorically a similar thing, Mr. Koz.”

    Clarence writing opinion as fact. It doesn’t get any better than that.

    Maybe you should live on Jupiter Clarence. That world might be big enough for your ego.

  3. twitter wrote, “It has always been possible to run any application on a server and export it to a thin client regardless of architecture used.”

    I have had a lot of experience with thin clients on x86. Some apps that ran well on x86 do not work well with thin clients. For example, OpenOffice.org, at one stage had some file-locking/version problems. One had to disable some “feature” to use it on a thin client. Currently, Google’s Chrome browser insists on “smooth” scrolling (showing any slide or scroll as several screens) becomes “stuttering” scrolling on thin clients because of the slight network lag. Any small lag recycled several times becomes annoyingly noticeable. The developers love smooth scrolling and don’t care about thin clients, I presume. It used to be an option a system administrator could turn off in the configuration distributed to users. Now it cannot. Opera, by the way, does allow turning off “stuttering scrolling”. In another case, Ubuntu was installing by default with GNOME a widget that checked the print queue once a second. On a thick client that was snappy. In a system with 100 simultaneous users it hammered the server with useless traffic. So, “possible” != “efficient”.

    With thin clients now about 10% of seats in IT globally, developers should give thin clients more respect but we aren’t there yet.

  4. twitter says:

    Libre Office already runs on ARM.
    http://packages.debian.org/wheezy/armel/libreoffice/download

    It might not fit so well on a three inch screen, but it should do just fine on most tablets. Open Office before it was also ported to all the other architectures too. It has always been possible to run any application on a server and export it to a thin client regardless of architecture used.

    The only thing standing in the way of any of this has been non free software owner malice and sabotage. That malice is most obvious when the idiots at Microsoft pull stunts like Metro or try to lock everyone out with “Secure Boot.”

    The company is going down the drain. They lost most developers a decade ago and have been running on fumes sense. 8 is going to be like any other WinCE or windows mobile device ever made – no apps, no developers, no users and no sales.

  5. Andrew says:

    If they want to get the users used to the metro look why does it look like explorer?

  6. Clarence Moon wrote of Metro, “there should be no cause for glee on the part of Mr. Pogson.”

    Oh, I am gleeful. M$ is starting way at the back of pack with 0 apps for Metro while Android/Linux had 100K apps. It’s easy to see what consumers will buy just like “Phoney 7”.

  7. oiaohm says:

    Clarence Moon there are a few issues.

    Wonder why MS is giving MS Office away for free with ARM version.

    http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2012/02/libreoffice-developer-shows-prototype-android-and-html5-ports.ars

    Might have something todo with it. Most likely by the time Windows 8 lands. Private cloud and android versions of libreoffice will be here.

    There are other open source applications that will also be private cloud applications as well as local Linux applications. So when connected to the business wifi. Your ipad and your windows tablet can get libreoffice from the private cloud server. Same with your companies private internal apps. Microsoft and apple both don’t need to know they exist.

    Advantage the business private documents are not left on those devices if you browser was in private browsing mode.

    So let the fun being. Libreoffice code base is already tested building on arm.

    Clarence Moon I don’t see businesses being tempted. Having to rebuild there internal apps is not going to go too well. Even worse having to give internal apps to MS global store. This is not going to work.

    Lot of business already hate side loading android devices.

    If anything WOA is going to push us faster to cloud based applications. The post X11 world of Linux is coming up fast. Where all applications will be html5 and direct to compositor in the form of Wayland.

    Also the big question is how long to port existing applications to Metro as well.

  8. Clarence Moon says:

    Metro is an improved version of the same launch pad paradigm used by Apple and Android and is thus categorically a similar thing, Mr. Koz. I can see where Apple fans might be dismayed at the prospect of having been one upped by Microsoft and Android users might be tempted to pack it in and get a Windows 8 device instead, but there should be no cause for glee on the part of Mr. Pogson.

  9. Kozmcrae says:

    “Metro is the same sort of launch pad as the main screens of Apple and Android devices, I understand, so where’s the beef?”

    Define “sort of” and you’ll find the beef.

  10. Clarence Moon says:

    I am not sure that you have the bull by the right kind of horn here, Mr. Pogson. Windows 8 Metro apps are what would be used, presumably, for smart phones and tablets in the only environment that ARM devices would be needed to be supplied with. What do you find so humorous in that?

    Metro is the same sort of launch pad as the main screens of Apple and Android devices, I understand, so where’s the beef?

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