What’s Happening With FLOSS in USA?

I was poking around NetApplications’ data looking for countries that loved FLOSS on the desktop. On this blog we find folks from the USA seem to be rabid lovers of non-free software. Why do they come to my blog when they are happy with M$ and “partners”? Who knows? Anyway, I happened to check USA and found, to my surprise they are one of the most FLOSS-friendly countries on the planet:

Further, California is off the charts…

,

way ahead of Cuba and Moscow…

CubaMoscow

So, I guess I have to take with a grain of salt all those who come here to tell the world that GNU/Linux will never make it on the desktop. These hotspots (San Francisco 5.49%, March AFB 50%) for GNU/Linux are in very populous regions and have a lot of weight in the webstats.

The biggest surprise of all is that Cupertino, Apple’s home base, sits at 8% GNU/Linux. For all of 2011, California was at 9% GNU/Linux so this is a major move. How long before the rest of the world does the same?

UPDATE
I found the ultimate hotspot in California. Google lives in Mountain View, California. The city has 74K inhabitants and a lot of them are googlers. The score? GNU/Linux 88%, That Other OS 11% and MacOS 1%. Ahhh… That feels right.

UPDATE

And another: Sunnyvale, CA, with 88% GNU/Linux. This is the home of Yahoo and Lockheed …

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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36 Responses to What’s Happening With FLOSS in USA?

  1. Yonah says:

    I think it’s great fun as is. I spent only 8 minutes on this prototype, but I think it’s got potential:

    http://www.myupload.org/files/a2duntwmre6z141ttgnh.jpg

  2. oldman says:

    “I am sorry, but am I really obliged to reiterate everything I have said to you in gibberish… I mean, Old English(TM)?”

    Nope, but it would be fun if you could?

  3. Flying Toaster says:

    Flying Toaster funny enough you do enough baseless claims so stiff. Walls of text always contain enough information to hunt down.

    That gets debunked every time (and I do mean every time).

    This site is wordpress that broken link checher don’t write “Broken link:” So you typed it.

    I don’t know what the Old English(TM) or Science Fiction(TM) equivalent of that is, so I’ll try and break it down as piecemeal as humanly possible so that your delirious mind will hopefully not drift again into one of those “Userful Windows NDA” fantasies:

    1) Mouse-over to the word “loading” in #comment-81555. It is enclosed by “a” tags without an “href” attribute. (Check the source HTML, genius.)

    2) Actually, there was an “href” attribute in the original submission, but somehow it got lost in the final HTML. Hence, the addendum.

    Really you don’t mention a missing reply.

    Well, it’s here now.

    So I am perfectly in my rights to presume you are just being your normal smart ass and trying to sneak a insult under the radar.

    Every time I mock you for using fictitious materials to support your argument, I do so overtly and openly so that everyone can see it. And if you want to count my instances of mocking as “insults”, then feel free to do so – because that’s pretty much what I see them as anyway.

    If a post is eat by the system say so basically.

    I am sorry, but am I really obliged to reiterate everything I have said to you in gibberish… I mean, Old English(TM)?

  4. oiaohm says:

    Flying Toaster funny enough you do enough baseless claims so stiff. Walls of text always contain enough information to hunt down.

    This site is wordpress that broken link checher don’t write “Broken link:” So you typed it. Don’t try being a smart ass with someone who runs web sites.

    Really you don’t mention a missing reply. So I am perfectly in my rights to presume you are just being your normal smart ass and trying to sneak a insult under the radar.

    If a post is eat by the system say so basically.

  5. Flying Toaster says:

    Correction:

    I -> I’m

  6. Flying Toaster says:

    Flying Toaster Just because you don’t want to believe the possibility that I could be right.

    Wha… What?

    My last post was just for a broken link in one that is yet to be approved. You sure are one heck of a character, aren’t you?

    And I really tired of walls of text that show neither working nor source of information.

  7. oiaohm says:

    Flying Toaster Just because you don’t want to believe the possibility that I could be right.

    Really you go back you notice a change in web numbers lining up with school holidays in an area.

    The abnormality have been there for a long time in web numbers.

    Flying Toaster the problem is what control group studies exist for the web numbers. To check what in heck they are measuring. There are none. But there are clear markers of abnormality that are not explained or studied by companies doing web numbers. Note the flux for schools is only up to about 15 percent.

    If you go back this history of that conference. You will notice they had install Linux events.

    Flying Toaster start drawing a map. Where the conference is. With web numbers around that. Interesting that the hot spot and conference line up.

    Either this is a very odd case of chance. Or Linux with well funded advertisement can kick MS but. If this is the case it complete breaks the logic that Linux is not good enough.

    88 percent is not explained by schools alone.

    Most Linux conferences each year are hosted in different locations. The SCaLE is the odd one that does not move very far at all. So each year there is a lot of Linux advertising in that area for the one event.

    Interesting is how big will the spot become.

  8. Flying Toaster says:

    Broken link:

    loading

  9. Flying Toaster says:

    The school where I worked last was happy to receive 8 year old PCs in good working order.

    Not the one which you have bought thin clients of unspecified values for? And broke anyway? Thanks for clarifying.

    I used the castoff machines from the lab to do that. They were piled up in storage and I installed GNU/Linux on them and used my personal GNU/Linux PC as a terminal server.

    Heartwarming story. Now how long ago was it again? And what happened to the machines after you left, you know, with them out of warranty and all that?

    Again, so many questions, yet so little answers.

    The students who used the old PCs got better performance than the new machines installed in the lab with that other OS.

    And how did you measure such performance? By first loading or simply ignoring the presence of some bulky application suite such as Norton Internet Security that constantly demands a large amount of system resources onto the Windows machines and then obtain the results with nothing more than naked eyes by test subjects (i.e. students) that have been inculcated with preconceptions on different operating systems by the experiment conductor (i.e. Robert Pogson)?

    And you know I am being very, very, generous about vague words such as “new” and “good”.

    FT ignores the obvious indication that Google bots are easily separated from client PCs running GNU/Linux so the assertion that Google bots are being confused with GNU/Linux client PCs is baseless.

    No, no, no… The question is not about how easy it is to separate Google bot traffics from the rest, but simply whether such traffics has been properly filtered out from the record.

    Come on, we are talking about Data Analysis 101 here. A physicist like you should have known better than that.

  10. oiaohm says:

    Flying Toaster you wanted something more modern.
    http://www.socallinuxexpo.org/scale9x/special-events/open-source-software-education

    Yes mini conference for the schools covering stuff of interest to them. Yes on the week end by demand. That is paid for entry as well it is not a free event.

    That mini conf has been growing every year since 2009. Flying Toaster.

    Yes a lot run the LTS version of like Ubuntu what is a very aged thing Flying Toaster.

    http://www.socallinuxexpo.org/scale9x-media/scalemedia/scale/scale9x-media/simple_cfp/presentations/10_00-Jim-Klein-Open-Tech.pdf Quite pro sales pitch is also coming out of that area.

  11. Flying Toaster, who chooses to ignore history, wrote, “Note also the news was from 2009, or three years ago. That’s a long time for IT stuff “

    The average PC is kept by organizations for five years of longer and schools keep them much longer so two or three years is current stuff. The school where I worked last was happy to receive 8 year old PCs in good working order. The number of seats and performance is much more important than age of the fleet. For education, throughput = (number of seats) X (throughput of each seat) and that is zero with no PCs in the building, barely usable with just a lab and absolutely wonderful with a cluster in each classroom. In one school where I worked, I set up a cluster in each of the high school classrooms and nearly eliminated the need for a lab for the high school, freeing valuable resources for the elementary grades. I used the castoff machines from the lab to do that. They were piled up in storage and I installed GNU/Linux on them and used my personal GNU/Linux PC as a terminal server. The students who used the old PCs got better performance than the new machines installed in the lab with that other OS.

    FT also wrote, “Don’t you just like cropped-outs from raw data with no specific meaning attached?”

    FT ignores the obvious indication that Google bots are easily separated from client PCs running GNU/Linux so the assertion that Google bots are being confused with GNU/Linux client PCs is baseless. In case readers don’t know, when a browser connects with a server, the browser sends a User-agent string which gives some information about the client so that the server can accommodate differences. They are the basis of NetApplications’ web stats which M$’s fans use to claim GNU/Linux is not popular.

  12. Flying Toaster says:

    Most California schools run Linux.

    “Most”. That some way you have there to spin a number of probably no more than 20 into a majority – one that runs ancient versions of Ubuntu, to say the least.

    Note also the news was from 2009, or three years ago. That’s a long time for IT stuff (saving for, I dunno, Pogson?)

    (A large swath of agent strings)

    Don’t you just like cropped-outs from raw data with no specific meaning attached?


  13. Googlebot/2.1 (+http://www.google.com/bot.html)
    DoCoMo/2.0 N905i(c100;TB;W24H16) (compatible; Googlebot-Mobile/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)
    SAMSUNG-SGH-E250/1.0 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 UP.Browser/6.2.3.3.c.1.101 (GUI) MMP/2.0 (compatible; Googlebot-Mobile/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)
    Googlebot/2.1 ( http://www.googlebot.com/bot.html)
    googlebot
    Mozilla/5.0+%28compatible%3B+Googlebot/2.1%3B++http%3A//www.google.com/bot.html%29
    Googlebot/2.1 (+http://www.googlebot.com/bot.html)
    Googlebot/2.1 (http://www.googlebot.com/bot.html)
    Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Googlebot/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)
    Googlebot-Image/1.0

    Yeah. Those certainly do resemble
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.9.0.3) Gecko/2008092903 Mandriva/1.9.0.3-1mdv2009.0 (2009.0) Firefox/3.0.3 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; es-CL; rv:1.9.2.17) Gecko/20110422 Ubuntu/10.04 (lucid) Firefox/3.6.17 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux x86_64; id; rv:1.9.0.19) Gecko/2010040121 Ubuntu/9.04 (jaunty) Firefox/3.0.19 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; ja; rv:1.9.2.13) Gecko/20101209 CentOS/3.6-2.el5.centos Firefox/3.6.13 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux x86_64; en-US) AppleWebKit/534.10 (KHTML; like Gecko) Chrome/8.0.552.237 Safari/534.10 | 5
    Opera/9.80 (X11; Linux i686; U; Linux Mint; en-GB) Presto/2.9.168 Version/11.52 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; es-ve) AppleWebKit/531.2+ (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/5.0 Safari/531.2+ Debian/squeeze (2.30.6-1) Epiphany/2.30.6 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.9.2.17) Gecko/20110515 HeartRails_Capture/1.0.4 (+http://capture.heartrails.com/) Namoroka/3.6.17 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/535.2 (KHTML; like Gecko) Ubuntu/10.10 Chromium/15.0.874.102 Chrome/15.0.874.102 Safari/535.2 | 5
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; es-AR; rv:1.9.1.16) Gecko/20110929 Iceweas

    (SARCASM!)I can see how they could get those mixed up.(/SARCASM)

    It could be the Wintel monopoly is broken.

  14. oiaohm says:

    nt_jerkface. We know its not the bots because that site removes the bots from numbers. So what else could it be.

    I can give you a very big hint.

    https://www.linux.com/news/enterprise/case-studies/16798-linux-makes-the-grade-in-california-schools

    Most California schools run Linux. Students are on-line more than anyone else.

    Basically you can gain 15 percent + market share on web numbers by having your OS as dominate in schools in the area.

    Web numbers are more a graphic of what schools are using than anything else.

    Areas with Apple spikes normally also trace to private schools in the area using Apple.

    Syndey Australia that has a google plex and a redhat office and many other Linux companies. Shows no such movement. But the schools there are all Microsoft Windows.

    This only applies to developed countries where schools have internet connections of course.

    nt_jerkface really do you think most tech works have the time to browse the Internet to be found by NetApplications as often as school students do.

    Nothing is broken other than the idea that web numbers give some for of magical over view.

  15. nt_jerkface says:

    The stats are skewed because of google bots. Yes search crawlers can be detected but the numbers are still off.

    Look at the demographics for Mountain View:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountain_View,_California

    Most tech workers there do not work for Google. Something is broken.

  16. Flying Toaster says:

    I can bet nt_jerkface will say something this stupid again.

    Meh. I have got enough of it from you already.

  17. oiaohm says:

    Flying Toaster still I want to see your response to a person stating something as stupid as nt_jerkface.

    Its a fair request when you pulled up a defect in my response. I want to be able to use yours in future. I can bet nt_jerkface will say something this stupid again.

  18. Flying Toaster says:

    I missed a comma/fullstop and you are picking on it.

    Sure I was.

  19. Flying Toaster says:

    test

  20. oiaohm says:

    Flying Toaster tell me how I am meant to answer a few sparks short person like this
    nt_jerkface
    “Anyways those net applications statistics are going to be thrown off by google bots. Still interesting though.”

    I missed a comma/fullstop and you are picking on it.
    “In fact no. Google bots id themselves as google bots so get removed from the numbers.”

    Google the id is multi form. There are ip ranges for google bots same with all other search engines. This is a publicly released information. They use a unique browser string. They check the .robot file to see if they are allowed or forbid.

    If they cannot filter out a goggle or other search engine bots you are a idiot idiot.

  21. Flying Toaster says:

    In fact no google bots id themselves as google bots so get removed from the numbers.

    Let me break this down for the rest of the readers here:

    1) “no google bots id themselves as google bots”

    therefore

    2) they “get removed from the numbers.”

    This is some interesting logic here because if these “google bots” do not “id themselves”, then how does a third party such as NetMarketShare distinguish them from the rest of the traffic and thus get them “removed from the numbers”?

    Ohmie, you are indeed a bleeding genius.

  22. oiaohm says:

    nt_jerkface In fact no google bots id themselves as google bots so get removed from the numbers.

    Same with other search engine bots.

    Bots don’t explain the abnormality.

  23. nt_jerkface says:

    Pogson I come to this blog because I find it entertaining. You’re the Rush Limbaugh of the tech blogosphere. Your BS is so over the top sometimes that it cracks me up.

    As for the Bay Area they have long had a lot of loons. It’s not just Google, a lot of web companies are based there which means a lot of Linux admins. I’m sure you’ll find that many of the East coast states are the opposite.

    Anyways those net applications statistics are going to be thrown off by google bots. Still interesting though.

  24. oe says:

    This is actually a cool thing. It is catching on by word of mouth. Maybe the Great Recession has started to help folks to refocus on value over flashiness…

  25. Kozmcrae says:

    “It seems to me that the variety of Linux distributions stems from a sort of vanity fair distinction created by the distribution’s proponents.”

    Why would it seem any other way to you Clarence?

  26. oiaohm says:

    Clarence Moon “unrelated products rather than just a continuum of evolution of the same thing. I wonder if they see Linux the same way.”

    http://test.winehq.org/

    If you spend some time in that test suite you will see why Linux people don’t call windows continuum of evolution. There are veneration in windows to windows that come from when it branched off from the main development tree of windows. Branching from tree. Those branches may or may not be equal patched against issues. Yes there is a continuum of evolution behind windows but there is branching off from that effect as well.

    Clarence Moon
    “Why does not one size or just a couple of sizes fit all?” Really there is more sizes in windows than you think in windows. Windows Starter does not use the same kernel memory management as the rest. Memory limit is applied. Xbox360 contains a cut down NT. Windows Phone will contain a NT.

    So it has to be a couple of sizes. One size fit all does not even work for windows.

    Different markets have different needs. I will say Linux world does have a problem working out how the market should be sliced up.

    RPM is better for silent installs. DEB provides a better configuration on install option. Gentoo and other source based package allowed you to tweak every build option.

    When you look at windows applications there is about 20 major package formats used. MSI might look like 1 but is a wrapper around other packaging solutions. Windows developers cannot decide on 1 package management solution either.

    Linux has had like religious wars over application packaging. The fragmentation that drives the differences between Linux distrobutions exists on windows as well just you are not noticing Clarence Moon.

    There are not that many major Linux blood lines.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gldt.svg

    Redhat and Debian are the two majors. Now I will look at the Debian branch. It appears huge right Clarence Moon. How many different repositories for binaries are in there.

    Nothing in Knoppix sub branch has its own binary repo.

    Ubuntu includes its own repo for binaries.

    Almost all the rest are just installer option alterations. With maybe a small repo to store the meta package describing what packages should be installed for that configuration and maybe a few configuration tweaks.

    What most people call Linux Distributions is just people like people make slipstreamed versions of windows that will auto install a preset stack of applications.

    Except due to Linux open source license people can share there slipstreamed version.

    Clarence Moon if you look at number of repositories for binaries. Linux is way smaller than it first appears. So yes a handful does fit all in the Linux world. It rare for a distribution to start its own fully independent repository system.

    Different install disc configuration is a different distribution. So that make windows 7 many distributions. They are all from the common blood line of Windows 7 that is from the common blood line of Windows NT. This is how Linux people look at it. 2000, XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 are different bloodlines of NT. With distrobutions under that. Draw windows tree how Linux world draws there distribution tree its a lot bigger.

    Windows 7 in distrobutions is 6 main names these main names have to be multiplied by the number of language and regional particular versions made. Windows 7 counted by distribution almost is as wide as ubuntu blood line yet without the venation in provided software. Microsoft fails to provide one size fits all as well. Just since you don’t travel the globe it kinda hidden from you.

    Different installer disc with different software configuration is a different distribution in the Linux world. 32 bit 64 bit and cpu difference is not counted as this would make the tree too complex old trees of Linux Distributions did list this detail.

    Yes common evolution in Linux is talking about the bloodlines not the distrobutions. Windows users commonly don’t understand what the word distrobution is fully referring to.

    Distrobution is referring to how the software is shipped to end users. Distrobution repositories is referring to how updates are handled. So many distributions may use the same distribution repositories so are not truly independent.

  27. Clarence Moon wrote, “Is Ubuntu full of bugs and only marginally useful?”

    Yes, in my experience. At Easterville, I used Ubuntu and had several problems due to the way Canonical generates it. I used a LTS (Long Term Support) release so that the distro was pretty well tuned up by the time I installed it and it was maintained for 5 years by Canonical. However, it takes longer than half a year to get the bugs out of a new release and I don’t recommend Ubuntu be used in such cases.

    I visited Ubuntu and looked at new and confirmed bugs. 74K bugs were found.

    In Debian GNU/Linux there are only a few hundred bugs preventing release.

  28. Clarence Moon says:

    Yes, but how are they different? Is Ubuntu full of bugs and only marginally useful? That is not what I understand to be the case. Why does not one size or just a couple of sizes fit all?

  29. Clarence Moon wrote, “What can Debian (often reccommended by Mr. Pogson) do that Ubuntu cannot?”

    The differences between distros is not so much what each can do but how they do it. Ubuntu is all about having the latest (and they think, greatest) thing in the distro where Debian GNU/Linux puts a lot more weight on having things work. Ubuntu releases on schedule while Debian releases when the bug count is very low, two totally different criteria. Debian has several flavours: experimental, testing, and stable. Stuff is tested for about two years before it gets into the stable release. Ubuntu is more comparable to the testing flavour.

    Either one of those distros is going to be quite different from Fedora which uses RPM instead of APT for package management or Gentoo which does not distribute binary packages.

  30. Clarence Moon says:

    I understood that, Mr. Conzo, but I did have the wondering thought as to what the Linux fans actually see as different. They seem to distinguish between Windows XP, Vista, 7, and 8, as well as earlier versions, as if they were stand-alone, unrelated products rather than just a continuum of evolution of the same thing. I wonder if they see Linux the same way.

    Where better to ask the question? Mr. Oiaohm alone will likely spend and hour regurgitating what his googling shows.

  31. Clarence Moon says:

    “So, I guess I have to take with a grain of salt all those who come here to tell the world that GNU/Linux will never make it on the desktop”

    I think that the issue is framed in different ways. You seem to focus on usage, Mr. Pogson, and have the naive belief that usage will surely lead to commerce. I think that the important issue is the commerce that can be measured directly in terms of the one pure play in the business, namely Microsoft.

    Microsoft’s business results continue to show a robust and mature cash cow sort of business, much different from the go-go growth business of decades past. If there is as much unsold market as you suggest with your voodoo statistics exercises, then that can only be good for Microsoft, offering a large segment of potential business that can be reached eventually and sold on the merits of Windows.

    Having a total monopoly is not really good for growing a business, Mr. Pogson, and the less likely that such a thing exists, the more likely that Microsoft can exploit the opportunities that presents.

    On the flip side, there is no measurable commerce in Linux outside of the business activities of Red Hat and whatever Novell has become in that regard. Of course I am excluding the Android scene, which I deem as a whole different ball of wax, but even there it is not apparent where there is any significant commerce in regard to Android itself. It is just an attribute of one class of smart phone and tablet and adopted by most of the device vendors outside of Apple, RIM, and Nokia.

    There is a lot of software business to pursue in that arena, I agree, but it is not OS business as it is in the PC arena.

  32. Conzo says:

    @Clarence: I was a tad tongue-in-cheek with that comment.

  33. Clarence Moon says:

    “advice on what Linux distro to use”

    At the end of the day, are they not all essentially the same? What can Debian (often reccommended by Mr. Pogson) do that Ubuntu cannot? It seems to me that the variety of Linux distributions stems from a sort of vanity fair distinction created by the distribution’s proponents.

  34. oiaohm says:

    The global inconsistency is always interesting.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_California_Linux_Expo

    Might explain the California one.

  35. Flying Toaster says:

    I can’t speak for others, but personally I lurk because I’m interested in psychology, and it provides me with a lot of good laughs.

    On a slightly unrelated note, I would like to see some statistics of “non-religious vaccination refusal” by household incomes. It’ll certainly be worth a good laugh if the “Beverly Hills folks” turns out to be the majority of antivaxxers.

  36. Conzo says:

    “Why do they come to my blog when they are happy with M$ and “partners”? Who knows?”

    I can’t speak for others, but personally I lurk because I’m interested in psychology, and it provides me with a lot of good laughs.

    Oh, and of course to get advice on what Linux distro to use 🙂

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