2011-11 Webstats From Wikimedia

I finally did it. I fired up Postgresql and inserted the webstats for November. It was very easy once I figured out how to do it. Postgresql has a neat file-reading function that permits a comma-delimited list to go into the relevant columns.
~/Downloads/2011-11$ for f in *;do cat $f/public/SquidDataAgents.csv|sed -e s/^#.*/comment,0/ |psql -c "\copy data from STDIN with delimiter ',' " agents

The “sed” part replaces the first line beginning with “#” with correct data that can be easily filtered out.

So, now that I have 30 days of data, what can I do with it? I have populated a table that shows:

OS count (1000s)
Linux (Android+GNU) 4878684
MacOS 21351671
Android/Linux 2714302
GNU/Linux 2219642
iPad 2573077
iPod 869003
iPhone 5142851
TOS 115043330
All 141364368

Thus, I can state conclusively that in this set of data, GNU/Linux runs on a hell of a lot more than 1% of browsing OS: 1.57%… and Android/Linux is about the same at 1.9%. And that other OS is in danger of losing its monopoly at 32% XP, 10% Vista and 38% “7”.

Search strings I used were:
select sum(count) as allos from data where string like ‘%Linux%’ or string like ‘%Windows%’ or string like ‘%Mac%’ or string like ‘%iPad%’ or string like ‘%iPod%’ or string like ‘%iPhone%’;

The surprise finding? Almost all of the hits from India with “en-in” were Android…

Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.3.3; en-in; HTC_WildfireS_A510e Build/GRI40
) AppleWebKit/533.1 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.2.1; en-in; HTC_Wildfire_A3333 Build/FRG83D
) AppleWebKit/533.1 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.1-update1; en-in; SonyEricssonE16i Build/2.
1.1.A.0.53) AppleWebKit/530.17 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/
530.17
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.2.1; en-in; LG-P500 Build/FRG83) AppleWebKi
t/533.1 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1 MMS/LG-Android-MM
S-V1.0/1.2
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.2.2; en-in; LG-P350 Build/FRG83) AppleWebKit/533.1 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1 MMS/LG-Android-MMS-V1.0/1.2
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.3.3; en-in; HTC_DesireHD_A9191 Build/GRI40) AppleWebKit/533.1 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.1-update1; en-in; Micromax A60 Build/ERE27) AppleWebKit/530.17 (KHTML; like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/530.17

and there were not many, just a total of 5800 counts.

The pleasant surprise? “en-gb” had 415million hits and 216million of them were “Linux”, mostly Android. Unfortunately postgresql is case sensitive by default and I had to use the “ilike” function. That shows 963.7million hits for “en-gb” and 31.56million had both “en-gb” and “x11” (GNU/Linux), about 3.3%. Android was 22% of hits from “en-gb” with a case-insensitive search. Cool.

Thanks, Wikipedia and Wikimedia for the stats.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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31 Responses to 2011-11 Webstats From Wikimedia

  1. oldman says:

    “No respect, why bother with it? Your preference will be for proprietary software, most likely from Microsoft.”

    Mr., K. You mistake me. I have the greatest respect fpr what pays the bills. What I do not respect are twerps like you who seem to think that the only software that counts is the freeware created by the commune. I have contempt for people like yourself who think that it OK to have to spend more time accomplishing the same tasks, if you can accomplish them at all. What the %^&! do I care if a web site uses apache and MySQL when the focus of what I am doing is the software is on my desktop and I am working locally. That is the issue here Mr. K., not your baloney.

    FOSS runs the internet? tell that to Cisco and Juniper whose routers form the core of the internet and whose NX-OS and Jun-OS are both closed source proprietary!

    So YOU are using more non-FOSS that you know. Its all over the place as well, and YOU cant escape it either.

    What I also find funny as well is that in the end you refuse to answer my challenge, dismissing it as a detail. The real reason that you do so IMHO is that you know that you have been presented with a case where your beloved FOSS cant hold a candle the commercial software. You can say that you don’t need it and that FOSS meets your needs just fine, but you cant make its superiority for the task go away.

  2. kozmcrae says:

    “Thank you, I could not have said it better, My. Dear Doctor.”

    You like to think that the work you do is the only serious work one can do and since you say you don’t use/need Linux then you are inferring that nobody does.

    We all know that Linux and GNU/Linux are part of very serious installations. I don’t need to rattle them off again.

    I’m not sure what you think you gain by belittling Linux and FLOSS. I can tell you that it doesn’t put you in some elevated class of opinions. It rather makes you stiff and unyielding. Don’t bother with that “I use whatever works best” BS. You have more than made your disrespect for FLOSS known. No respect, why bother with it? Your preference will be for proprietary software, most likely from Microsoft.

    Now for you Dr. Loser. Why should people bother to care what runs on their toasters? I don’t. But I do care and I am very grateful for what runs on my computer. Hardly a week goes by where I say, “I’m so glad I use Linux.”. I say it when I notice that it’s working exactly the same as the day I installed it with a few exceptions in selected applications. I love its consistency. I can still remember Windows constant state of flux and little surprises. Not so with GNU/Linux.

    If people don’t know what is working for them then that’s okay, but you do Dr. Loser. You know as much as anyone who posts on this blog how much we are affected by FLOSS. Say thank you.

  3. oldman, I can use drag and drop tools as well but I have a very simple database with one table and two fields so the typing is pretty easy. The hard part is being able to understand the User-agent strings. There’s no consistent pattern. I’ve seen devices that say both Linux and Android, Android and not Linux, and one that said Windows and Linux (virtual machine???). One can get pretty surprising results if one is unaware. That’s why I did one with “firefox” so that at least the browser might consistently show stuff. Then we have IIS showing the same stuff as a desktop client. That inflates M$’s numbers I guess…

  4. Yonah says:

    “I suspect at least one of their subscriptions is from within China because I see nothing of the ramp in usage of GNU/Linux which started about July, 2010 in the Wikipedia data yet NetApplications sees it. That was near the time Dell and Ubuntu started selling in 200 stores in China.”

    Again, I ask, can you show me evidence that these stores (defined as a building a person can physically walk into) are NOW carrying said merchandise on store shelves (a real physical structure usually constructed of metal, design to display items for sale) in 2012?

    The only thing you’ve shown before is an announcement made in 2011 that these items would begin selling in the future, though the date was not specified. What was happening in 2010?

  5. oldman says:

    Pog

    MS Access has allowed for drag and drop creation of SQL statements, and Tools like Crystal reports allow for SQL statements to be embedded in the reporting tools.

    Nobody but DBA’s write their own ad-hoc sql querys directly any more, and even thay are using rgaphical tools.

    So unfortunately all you are doing is showing us how out of touch with personal desktop usage that you are.

  6. Dr Loser wrote, “Some of us have important work to do. And, generally speaking, it isn’t going to be on a toy like Linux.”

    A lot of serious work is done on GNU/Linux. Individuals, governments, businesses all use GNU/Linux. $Billions have been invested in GNU/Linux and it has paid off handsomely. The price/performance ratio is very high compared to that other OS and some of the applications that run on it.

    So, Dr Loser was not “generally speaking” at all but muttering to himself.

    The serious work done on Wikipedia is done 22:1 by users of that other OS, but certainly a lot use Linux:

    select ‘that other OS’ as OS, sum(count) as count from data where string ilike ‘%windows%’and string ilike ‘%FireFox%’ union select ‘Linux’ as OS, sum(count) as count from data where string ilike ‘%Linux%’ and string ilike ‘%FireFox%’;
    os | count
    —————+———-
    Linux | 1485329
    that other OS | 33349127

    In UK, apparently, a much higher proportion use Linux. The ratio’s only 18:1

    select ‘that other OS’ as OS, sum(count) as count from data where string ilike ‘%windows%’and string ilike ‘%en-gb%’ and string ilike ‘%FireFox%’ union select ‘Linux’ as OS, sum(count) as count from data where string ilike ‘%Linux%’ and string ilike ‘%en-gb%’ and string ilike ‘%FireFox%’;
    os | count
    —————+——–
    Linux | 22796
    that other OS | 407657
    .

    In Brazil, the ratio’s even lower: 6:1.
    select ‘that other OS’ as OS, sum(count) as count from data where string ilike ‘%windows%’and string ilike ‘%pt-br%’ and string ilike ‘%FireFox%’ union select ‘Linux’ as OS, sum(count) as count from data where string ilike ‘%Linux%’ and string ilike ‘%pt-br%’ and string ilike ‘%FireFox%’;
    os | count
    —————+——–
    Linux | 35482
    that other OS | 202698

  7. oldman says:

    “Some of us have important work to do. And, generally speaking, it isn’t going to be on a toy like Linux.”

    Thank you, I could not have said it better, My. Dear Doctor.

    Of course I pretty much expected Mr. K’s non-answer was going to be along the lines of: YouDontNeedThat(TM).

    But I never expected

    MostPeopleDontNeedThat

    or

    RespectWhatYouCantUse

    Do we have new TM’s here?

  8. Clarence Moon wrote, “There really is no use of FLOSS for any poplar purpose outside of Linux use itself”.

    Nonsense. LibreOffice/OpenOffice.org are widely used on that other OS as are FireFox, VLC, Java…

    Clarence Moon wrote, “Outside of LAMP, there really isn’t anything to crow about in FLOSS.”

    More nonsense. Hadoop, OpenStack, PostgreSQL, Android/Linux, etc. are huge in IT. There’s no part of IT untouched by FLOSS.

    Worse than nonsense. Clarence Moon knows better than to write this nonsense. Clearly, he appears to be intent on shitting in the stream, a source of drinking water for everyone downstream.

  9. Clarence Moon says:

    The talk goes on endlessly about “FLOSS” as some sort of conceptual entity that has a well-deserved place in the IT business. Every time that you get down to details, though, the conversation about FLOSS turns to a conversation about Linux. It would seem to me that the two notions are pretty much the same thing.

    There really is no use of FLOSS for any poplar purpose outside of Linux use itself. Sure there are the other letters in LAMP, but if you compare that to Windows, Apache is just Linux’s way of saying IIS and MySQL is just the Linux version of SQL Server Express, and PHP is just a poor Linux man’s equivalent to ASP.NET.

    Sure, some of the “AMP” stuff works with Windows, too, but it is only critical to the Linux ecosystem. Outside of LAMP, there really isn’t anything to crow about in FLOSS. Firefox and Open Office maybe, but who really cares? Browsers are a dime a dozen and IE is still the most used. Everyone who does something worth money uses MS Office in their business.

    FLOSS is Linux. Forget the GNU, too.

  10. Dr Loser says:

    @Koz:

    Has it occurred to you that no sane person would care what runs on routers and toasters and supercomputers and even website servers?

    That is, unless their job depends on this stuff. Or maybe their breakfast.

    Look, you win on everything you consider important. You win, OK?

    You can even add in low-margin phones, if you want. You win! I’m quite happy with a phone that counts from 0-9, like an updated Strowger switch.

    You win! You win! You win!

    Now, can you stop whining, please?

    Some of us have important work to do. And, generally speaking, it isn’t going to be on a toy like Linux.

  11. Kozmcrae says:

    “You still havent responded to either challenges, because you think that all you need to do is say “FOSS wins” and it is automatically QED”

    Your challenges represent detail, as in look at this, FLOSS doesn’t cover this (actually it does quite well). No @ldman, FLOSS is all over you and you couldn’t live with out it at this point. It’s too late.

    If you wish to see some fact go look for it yourself. With one exception that you really need to see I will not repeat myself like you do.

    FLOSS wins. Show that it doesn’t. Don’t point to some trivial (as in less that 1% of the users world-wide are recording musicians) niche market.

    You don’t have to like it. Just recognize its place in IT and show the same respect you show for the other software that makes you productive.

    Just because FLOSS wins doesn’t mean you lose. Everybody wins.

  12. oldman says:

    “You can show some respect for the FLOSS that makes your life in IT more productive or you can continue to wear that bullseye on your back.”

    Mr K. I respect the toolmakers that make the tools that I use on a regular basis. I respect the people who created the concepts on top of which the structures that I depend on work. But I do not and never will respect pipsqueaks like you who think that they can bully soneone into doing something.

    So YOU have painted a bullseye on my back. So what!
    I have had discussions with people who actually say something. All you do is spew noise at me. Not a single real argument.

    You still havent responded to either challenges, because you think that all you need to do is say “FOSS wins” and it is automatically QED.

    It isnt.

    And nothing that you say is going to change that point.

    So how about answering how the lack of the internet and FOSS is going to stop me from composing music with the commercial tools that I have?

    And better still, why I should respect a FOSS application that does less than what I have now.

    I await your answer.

  13. Clarence Moon wrote, “Chinese are not all lined up to get cheap small computers of the Android persuasion”.

    It would be more correct to state that in a country of 1billion+ people the probability of a hundred or so Apple fans happening in one place is non-zero. Also they did not get millions thronging to all four stores, just one had a few. Remember “Start You UP!” in 1995. M$ managed to get thousands lined up around the block for Lose ’95…

  14. Clarence Moon says:

    This just handed to me, Mr. Pogson!

    http://behindthewall.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/01/13/10147277-iphone-4s-china-release-sparks-scuffles-and-eggings

    It would appear that the Chinese are not all lined up to get cheap small computers of the Android persuasion. Rather, they are not going to be satisfied until they get their hands on the real thing as evidenced by their tenacity today.

  15. Kozmcrae says:

    “The fact is that as long as Pog continues to repeat over and over again his miconceptions about commercial software, I shall continue to repeat the other side of the story.”

    But he doesn’t simply repeat. He reports and comments on developments of GNU/Linux and FLOSS. They just happen to be about the slow and painful (to you) decline of Microsoft and the other proprietary leaders. It’s the same story but about new growth of open source. You, however, literally repeat yourself (“bu$ine$$ is bu$ine$$ Pog”).

    Any comments are fair game. You are fair game @ldman. You can show some respect for the FLOSS that makes your life in IT more productive or you can continue to wear that bullseye on your back.

  16. Dr Loser wrote, “FLOSS is, by definition, non-commercial software.”

    GPL: “The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).” That includes commercial use.

    Commercial organizations/businesses use FLOSS.

    People pay a lot of money to have FLOSS installed and maintained, commercially.

    What’s not “commercial” about FLOSS? Nothing. Limiting business/commerce to particular means of doing IT is wrong, potentially illegal, and inefficient. Business is about making money and providing goods and services. FLOSS works for business.

  17. Dr Loser says:

    @Robert:

    “FLOSS is commercial software, oldman, and I have no misconceptions about it.”

    Apart from the fact that FLOSS is, by definition, non-commercial software.

    And there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. But it comes with its own caveats, and one of those caveats is that you should pay particular attention to any company that benefits from FLOSS and does not return the results to the community.

    Me? I don’t care. GNU has been an irrelevancy since about 1995.

    But you? I think you should pay closer attention to the likes of Red Hat, IBM, Google and so on.

  18. oldman wrote, “Pog continues to repeat over and over again his miconceptions about commercial software”.

    FLOSS is commercial software, oldman, and I have no misconceptions about it. FLOSS is open for all to see what it is and the licence is pretty simple compared to that other OS. The EULA of M$, for instance, needs several lawyers to be understood and then you would need to take a vote. You continue to state that FLOSS is somehow inferior to “commercial” software and yet FLOSS is commercial software. That makes no sense and is in itself a misconception.

    RedHat which you have often praised ships a lot of FLOSS as commercial software and it is good. The markets thinks so, end users think so and so do you. Your positions are inconsistent. Mine are. I believe FLOSS is superior to non-Free software because the licence is better/easier to use and there’s greater participation, less lock-in, malware, re-re-reboots, etc. That’s not a misconception but fact. FLOSS is the right way to do IT. Many individuals, organizations and businesses find it pays off handsomely to use FLOSS. (sarcasm)Are they all deluded like me? (/sarcasm)

  19. oldman says:

    “You’ve said all you will ever say about anything that will ever come up for discussion on this blog. And you’ve said it dozens and dozens of times. You have nothing new to add.”

    It doesnt work that way Mr. K.

    The fact is that as long as Pog continues to repeat over and over again his miconceptions about commercial software, I shall continue to repeat the other side of the story.

    If you dont like what I say, then dont presume to butt in on a conversation that you are no part of.

  20. Kozmcrae says:

    “…leaving nerds and microsoft haters like you in the dust as they laugh all the way to the bank.”

    It’s your misconception or just plain arrogance, making money from FLOSS is not any less likely than making money from proprietary software.

    You’ve been around these pages long enough to know and understand FLOSS as much as anyone @ldman. Yet you feign ignorance and spew the same old crap. You expect people to spoon feed you the basic elements of FLOSS like a 5 year old over and over again. And some of them do. It’s a complete waste of time.

    You’ve said all you will ever say about anything that will ever come up for discussion on this blog. And you’ve said it dozens and dozens of times. You have nothing new to add.

  21. Ivan says:

    If those eight million computers are all in your garage, then it’s a hell of a lot, Bob. They are not in your garage, however, so those eight million computers are just a smidgen.

  22. Clarence Moon says:

    “So, you think it is somehow normal that a business pays for something again for which it has already paid?”

    You are trying to force an answer, I guess, but it just shows a bias towards your own attitudes. Many companies pay outsiders for specific services, even perhaps things that they could well do for themselves but just do not want to spend the management attention to do the job.

    I don’t think that they are much of a partner of Microsoft, either. They list a long litany of big companies who have presumably paid them for something in the past. The list includes Mozilla, too, you may have noticed. One thing that I could not find on their site was any reference to hardware unit sales percentages by volume or dollar value. Perhaps you could provide a link.

  23. Ivan wrote, to the maths teacher, “1.57% is not a hell of a lot more than 1%”.

    To be exact, it’s 57% larger, Ivan. That’s quite a margin of error in NetApplications’ numbers, I would say. Would you accept 57% error by the police on your speeding ticket? It might raise your penalty to time in jail in some jurisdictions.

    1% of 1500 PCs in action globally is 15 million PCs. 1.57% of 1500million PCs is 23.6 million. 8 million is a Hell of a lot of PCs, isn’t it? If they were in Internet cafes or schools, it could represent 80 million users, enough to populate a seriously big country.

    The fact is that en.wikipedia.org serves a lot of people but most are using English and come from English-speaking countries. The share of GNU/Linux in a lot of countries is being ignored by these statistics as is NetApplications. e.g. “zh-ch” (China) get 0.07% of hits but has more surfers than USA. GNU/Linux is running on several times as many PCs as they indicate. The real value of these numbers for GNU/Linux is that they are all increasing. M$’s share of IT is continually decreasing, 5% per annum according to Wikipedia.org. That is a Hell of a large decrease in M$’s monopoly power. A few more years and they will be just another player at the table.

  24. oldman, FLOSS is allowed to be used for any purpose under most licences. “Commerce” is just one of those allowed uses. There are four freedoms of Free Software. Use is one of them.

    Google, despite some of the choices it made with Android/Linux, is a great supporter and user of FLOSS for many purposes, like their server farms, search engines, and now Android/Linux. Google makes no/little profit directly from production/distribution of Android/Linux devices. They profit from the services provided to users of those devices. HAHAHA! The laugh is on M$ who laughed at Google for not having a business plan… all those many years ago. The plan is working fine, they are leaving M$ in the dust (Bing…, Zune, Phoney “7”…, clouds, search, e-mail, social sites…). Everywhere that M$ attempt to thwart competition they fail. Everywhere M$ tries to compete they fail. FLOSS is a better way to do IT.

  25. oldman says:

    “GNU/Linux in particular and FLOSS in general are creeping into your life and there is nothing you can do about it.”

    Yep and it will be great fun to watch the commercial interests co-opt it for commercial use( Mas google has done with the commercial OS named Android), leaving nerds and microsoft haters like you in the dust as they laugh all the way to the bank.

  26. Ivan says:

    “I finally did it.”

    Mazel tov!

    “Thus, I can state conclusively that in this set of data, GNU/Linux runs on a hell of a lot more than 1% of browsing OS: 1.57%…”

    Now I may have to check my unit conversions again, but 1.57% is not a hell of a lot more than 1%. Last I checked that was a smidgen more, possibly a scosh, but definitely not a hell of a lot.

  27. Kozmcrae says:

    “Here you are are suggesting that the rather nerdy Wikipedia data reflects some dramatic increase in Linux use worldwide…”

    It’s only “dramatic” to you and the other members of the Cult of Microsoft Clarence. You’ve been denying any GNU/Linux numbers over about 1% for so long you believe it yourself. The numbers Mr. Pogson is reporting are not a “sudden” increase, they’ve been steadily increasing all along.

    Get used to it Cult of Microsoft. GNU/Linux in particular and FLOSS in general are creeping into your life and there is nothing you can do about it.

    FLOSS wins.

  28. Clarence Moon wrote, “the site owner is in some sort of business where it is useful to know the broad site statistics and they are willing to pay for that information.”

    So, you think it is somehow normal that a business pays for something again for which it has already paid?

    ie. This information is obtainable from the servers’ logs. The company owns the servers or rents them and already pays people to run those servers… Would you pay a gardener to take care of your weeds if he submits to you a bill from a second gardener to take care of those same weeds? Ewwww… That’s no way to run a business.

    The NetApplications’ model of business is strange. They are a partner of M$ which is stranger still. Their data is strongly suspect especially when it disagrees sharply with legal submissions like SEC filings from Apple whereas Wikipedia seems right on. In 2011, the world shipped about 360million PCs and Apple shipped
    Total Mac unit sales 16,735, 4.6%, yet NetApplications says 6.4%.

  29. Clarence Moon says:

    I think that the selectivity imposed on NetApplications sites due to someone having to pay money to use the services is a better indicator of the commercial importance of the data. The NetApplications sites are sites where the site owner is in some sort of business where it is useful to know the broad site statistics and they are willing to pay for that information.

    Free sites, on the other hand, are more frequently comprised of less serious owners who are just out to grind a personal ax, such as mrpogson.com, or are in some other sort of vanity fair category.

    Significantly, the really popular sites, for example Facebook or Google, do not publish any data at least anymore. When Google Zeitgeist offered OS usage information, the Linux numbers matched pretty well with NetApplications data.

  30. Clarence Moon wrote, ” the more general NetApplications data”.

    Chuckle. NetApplications data comes from sites that pay NetApplications to analyze the data. That’s not generally the case. It is a very self-selected group. Wikipedia on the other hand are people seeking information and contributing information, somewhat reflective of all sentient beings on the planet. Wikipedia in effect has a major bias in language in that most of the content is in English. English is widely used in science, technology, and is geographically dispersed but is clearly giving a bias. I wish it’s use were more popular in China so we could see the installed base of PCs there but it’s not. Same with Brazil and Russia and France and Germany. I hold Wikipedia to be more general than NetApplications until they disclose the sites. Further, I suspect at least one of their subscriptions is from within China because I see nothing of the ramp in usage of GNU/Linux which started about July, 2010 in the Wikipedia data yet NetApplications sees it. That was near the time Dell and Ubuntu started selling in 200 stores in China. Unfortunately, NetApplications charges money for that detailed information and I don’t want to pay it.

  31. Clarence Moon says:

    What is always missing from these “anlyses” is any information about how well the statistical data used actually matches to the general population of personal computers in the realm over which you are imputing the results.

    It seems that any result that favors Windows is discounted with claims of bias or that the data overlooks some nugget of Linux use. Here you are are suggesting that the rather nerdy Wikipedia data reflects some dramatic increase in Linux use worldwide, the data surely being an accurate reflection of how everyone uses their PC. But you reject the more general NetApplications data which shows a different result.

    Also, 1.57%, given with such precision, is hardly
    “a hell of a lot more than 1%”. Rather, it is 0.57% more and likely to be totally inaccurate, given the inherent inaccuracy of the methodology used here.

    I think that you have to look to statistics that more directly measure the results you are trying to achieve. For Microsoft, that would be meeting the expectations of analysts and investors in terms of profits, growth, and on-going business prospects. For desktop Linx, it would simply be the continued development of Linux distributions and continued free access to them.

    It is fairly obvious that Linux will continue to evolve as it has for 20 years now as determined by the public statements of its developers. It is also fairly clear that Microsoft is still growing in terms of annual revenues and profits and will also continue.

    You don’t need all this hocus-pocus with web stats data, Mr. Pogson, just look up at the scoreboard.

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