Boneheaded Stunts

Don Reisinger has a list of M$’s mistakes in 2011:

  1. Where were the tablets?
  2. Let Google cement its lead online
  3. Failing to acquire a handset maker
  4. Let Android get away
  5. An odd Nokia partnership
  6. Failing to wrap up the living room
  7. Retaining Steve Ballmer as CEO
  8. Let Google cement its lead online
  9. Overpaid for Skype
  10. Tipped its Windows 8 hand too early
  11. Failing to make the mobile space about security

Those are fair and reasonable observations but they all stem from the same root. By concentrating on stifling competition rather than innovating for decades, M$ has made itself unresponsive to the changing IT market. When they might have been making a great search engine they were busy telling the world how foolish and lacking a business plan was Google. When they might have been doing something in mobile they were telling the world to buy bigger and better and more expensive power-hungry boxes from “partners”. When GNU/Linux was knocking on the desktop, they wasted years spreading FUD instead of toughening their stuff against malware. Now their reputation is that of an unreliable/over-priced supplier in many segments and Google, and Android/Linux and GNU/Linux are taking huge shares away from M$. Now, while the world of IT is shipping product that does not depend on M$, M$ is falling back on lawsuits they won’t win.

The bonehead plays weren’t made in 2011 but in 1991 and onward. They won’t end until the money dries up and/or they fire their top management. That’ll be in about five years, when the monopoly is history and M$ has to compete on price/performance in every sector of IT. At the moment, they have desktop, productivity and server cash-cows still giving milk but they are old and soon to run dry. Even if their FUD, lawsuits, marketing and lawsuits manage to keep some share of the market the heady days of huge growth and unlimited potential are over. It took notebooks only a few years to overtake desktops and now ARMed smartthingies are doing the same for notebooks. There’s no monopoly in ARM for M$ and without that they are just another fish in the pond.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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3 Responses to Boneheaded Stunts

  1. twitter says:

    “Business tablet means Office” I’m really laughing out loud at that one. It would not take much to run Libre Office on a tablet, if you have to deal with someone dumb enough to pay hundreds of dollars for a text editor. People like that are few and far between these days.

  2. Clarence Moon says:

    Journalistic society itself is on the skids with the internet as a source of editorial comments via what must be millions of blogs on every topic under the sun. News comes from the major news web sites and even the local news on TV today consists of numerous shilling pleas to “get more on this on our WNNNTV.COM site!”.

    Newspapers are hollow shells with minimal news, all of it stale, and advertising rapidly migrating to eBay or Craig’s list. Help Wanted is entirely gone to Monster.com and similar sites.

    I don’t think that the eZines pay very well for articles such as the one cited here and the depth of analysis provided reflects that.

    You can get a better handle on things by putting in a brooha to Jim Cramer and just asking him what he things about MSFT.

  3. Phenom says:

    Don’s article is the crying proof that most tech-journalists on the loose are a bunch of incompetent, arrogant dunces.

    I simply can’t even imagine how the heck Don made these statements.

    1. Where were the tablets?
    Right now, there is hardly a tablet, suitable for businesses. Business tablet means Office, and integration with Sharepoint. There are Windows 7-based tablets, which are fully-fledged laptops with a multi-touch screen. And yes, they are expensive, and targetted towards the business.

    2. Let Google cement its lead online
    I really wonder how you can dethrone someone’s leading position on the search market within one year. The inertia of people makes it impossible.
    As for Ads, Google’s biggest threat is not Microsoft. It is big publishers who refuse their services, and the growing small and fierce competitors, who do better syndication and offer better margins.

    3. Failing to acquire a handset maker
    Why should they? MS sealed a deal with Nokia. That’s by miles much better than aquiring a hardware company, and put all our partners to risk of unfair competition.

    4. Let Android get away
    This is not MS’s problem. MS is receiving nice lump sums of Android, much more than Google does.

    5. An odd Nokia partnership
    See point 3. And one more proof Don is a dunce.

    6. Failing to wrap up the living room
    Gosh, what a shame they didn’t do it in 2011! From what we’ve been shown recently, MS are to do it soon. And there is not even competition in sight.
    XBox is already a better Internet TV than Google TV.

    7. Retaining Steve Ballmer as CEO
    This arguement has always been mystifying. MS is flourishing in terms of income and profit in the midst of world-wide crisis. 7 is a success, Office 2007 / 2010 are, XBox Kinect is, Server 2008 is… Why would you change the CEO who drives the company forward is beyound me.

    9. Overpaid for Skype
    I can only wonder how Don estimated the real price of Skype.

    10. Tipped its Windows 8 hand too early
    This is a contradiction with the notion that MS is late to the tablet market. Hint: MS does not care that much if desktops are to convert to 8 as soon as 8 comes out; 8 targets another platform.

    11. Failing to make the mobile space about security
    There is not a single piece of malware for WP7. Not a single one.
    Only Don and loons can justify such a statement.

    I start to think that tech-journalists are among the lowest casts of the journalist society.

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