Malaysia: IT To Become a Profession

A proposal to require certification of all IT practitioners is shocking to some but Malaysia is considering it. I imagine there would be a transitional period. The government of Malaysia widely uses and promotes GNU/Linux so I would bet re-education of many IT practitioners would be required.

The problem with such proposals is that it is a barrier to entry for youth/poor so there could be some constriction of labour in the field. On the other hand, education can take care of that.

In any event, I see this as an opportunity for GNU/Linux to grow as self-education in GNU/Linux is fairly straight-forward due to the openness of FLOSS. Students can legally examine the code and install/configure GNU/Linux as often as they want without requiring a licence. That other OS restricts everything to payments.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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11 Responses to Malaysia: IT To Become a Profession

  1. Clarence Moon says:

    I think that the slip of paper is more than just an indication that someone has passed a test. It is becoming a precondition to obtain employment in various disciplines. Once hired, it is still required to do the work competently, but the slip of paper is needed to get the chance.

  2. oiaohm says:

    Ivan depends if they can get the bit of paper back after they screw up. If not it is a one chance deal. So should make IT more careful.

  3. Ivan says:

    “I think that the notion of the brave, self-educated man is going away in favor of the well documented practitioner these days.”

    That slip of paper just means that someone passed a test, not that they are competent at the job.

    “The situation is even more closed if the certification is a license to practice issued by the state.”

    That’s what bribes are for, we are talking about Malaysia after all.

  4. Dr Loser says:

    “I would bet re-education of many IT practitioners would be required.”

    Perhaps Malaysia could borrow from the example of various neighbouring countries.

    It would be a shame to waste all that “re-education” experience, wouldn’t it?

    They could even invite all the Chinese entrepreneurs back. I understand you are quite keen on Chinese entrepreneurs.

  5. Kozmcrae says:

    Sometimes people move up within an organization as they gain knowledge working with the systems at hand. It’s not always transferable knowledge but it could be of value in specific situations.

  6. I’ll wager my B.Sc. (Hons.), M.Sc., Cert. Ed. had some weight. People actually paypaid me $thousands more per annum because I had them. Typically, I was paid about $9000 more per annum to have those certifications. It cost me perhaps $5000 in the good old days to acquire them. I am not counting lost wages while being a student. I was actually paid to be a student… My formal education paid for itself many times over and most of it was fun.

  7. Clarence Moon says:

    I think that the notion of the brave, self-educated man is going away in favor of the well documented practitioner these days. Without the degree or the certification, there is no interview and without an interview there is no job. Without an IT admin job, there is no way to prove oneself. The situation is even more closed if the certification is a license to practice issued by the state.

    Don’t belittle the certification.

  8. Ivan says:

    “In one way I would find this good it would do in a lot of fly by night problems of IT officers.”

    Because that little slip of paper, hanging in a frame on the wall of a cubicle solves all problems, from HR’s standpoint.

    Outside of HR, certifications are meaningless.

  9. I have no idea what Malaysia will put in its requirements but it would be cute if they polished up the skills of all IT with GNU/Linux while ignoring that other OS. M$ would have to give free training to compete… I believe they should ban that other OS as too insecure and fraudulent but regulating it out of existence works too. Things could get very interesting if they refused to certify folks who only knew point and click on XP.

  10. Kozmcrae says:

    Linux IT administrators earn more than their Windows counterparts. At least in the US they do; maybe elsewhere too. That’s got to be a little demoralizing to the Windows guys.

  11. oiaohm says:

    In one way I would find this good it would do in a lot of fly by night problems of IT officers.

    At least it has to be more open than the Australian schools one when you have to be invited by existing members to take the exam.

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