“8” Makes Vista Look Good

In the striptease to “8” M$ lets out that they will create graphs to show how downloads are going. Imagine that. Instead of a few words and numbers they are going to create a data-structure for every transfer and update it periodically and redraw the graphs. That should do a lot to waste resources on ARM, eh? Updating a periodic sample to create a moving average was too easy. Instead they want to make a big deal about a download.

see Microsoft unveils file-move changes in Windows 8

Aims to fix comical download/copy ‘time to go’ estimates

That’s M$ for you. Instead of improving the sampling or revising the algorithm, they are going to rip and replace with a much heavier burden as if we have nothing better to do with our IT.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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25 Responses to “8” Makes Vista Look Good

  1. oiaohm says:

    Basically you are being a idiot oldman.

    “peoplesoft has very specific support requirements that you are circumventing.”

    How dare you claim this. Issue did speak to them before doing.

    They have very specific requirements in require library versions and java is in fact openjdk or IBM JDK version if you ask both work on tile. Since that is the redhat enterpise support requirement since openjdk is default and AIX support requirements is IBM JDK by defaut.

    http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B31343_01/psft/acrobat/itools848_062706_itdb2unixnt.pdf
    Please read.

    Only parts that require x86 or x86-64 or even particular versions of Linux are the additional parts.

    At no point have I circumvented the support requirements.

    I have extra requirements from asking.

    Tuxedo you have to have a direct license for that so it can be used on tile. What I already had due to other things being run. Please note tuxedo is not a cheep license for tile. Oracle is a solution provider pay enough you can have anything. If I did not have tuxedo already most likely would have ended up cheaper to place Peoplesoft on a x86 if that is all you were running that was using it.

    Just like running Peoplesoft on PowerPC, MIPS or ARM servers you have to pay for tuxedo as a extra. Even shockly to use Oracles own sparc servers you have to pay for tuxedo as an extra to run Peoplesoft fully. It was a guy using sparc who made me aware that Peoplesoft worked on stuff not listed in the spec sheet and it paid to contact them.

    Yes tuxedo is the most expensive part.

    Tuxedo that comes with Peoplesoft software is very much like the limited servers sql servers that come with some programs.

    I do have one hack that Peoplesoft also do when on particular cpus. Microfocus cobol complier. That is running inside qemu on the tile using binfmt-misc. But since its being used only when cobol code gets changed to produce java performance hit is nothing and the work around was approved before I did it.

    Again I had wrote to Peoplesoft before I did it and got approval in writing. Now if what I was considering doing they were not going to give me support on I would not have done it. Surprising what you can get when you ask.

    Yes one of the things I had to check before I did it was contact Oracle/Peoplesoft about what I was going todo that support would not be voided.

    This is your problem oldman you don’t know the limitations of what you are really allowed todo and remain fully supported. Asking is required.

    Management understands that now tile uses less power gets the job done taking up bugger all space in the rack and has support contracts covering it.

    Yes oldman I have had idiots before walk in find out peoplesoft running on the tile run to boss say hey that is an hacked up environment to attempt to get me fired and be fired the same day for incompetence. Since everything on there is approved by peoplesoft. Not something I have just done.

    Same mistake people make with peoplesoft on arm servers. Seeing them and thinking impossible. Really should be do you have the paperwork on that.

    Yes I would say setting up on tile to run peoplesoft is a pain in ass in paperwork and I don’t recommend doing it. It was only a case I had tile stuff on hand and it fixed load problem we were having without requiring massive more rackspace what we had just run out of and were going to be waiting quite a few months for more if we were lucky or years at worst. Yes tile chips are some of the biggest bang for space you can do.

    Cost is not always the reason for going to some of these different cpus. Space can be a big driver.

    Mind you peoplesoft on arm would be a fairly neat walk in the park. None of the nightmares of cross distribution package naming.

    Peoplesoft is really a good example oldman. Really there is very little software for Linux if you ask is not cross cpu. Sometimes extra bills to pay. But just reading the spec sheets without talking to the company making the software will lead you trick you that things items are unsupported when in fact they are supported if you ask.

    So yes my path is not the cheep path.

  2. oldman says:

    “oldman on tile is been items red5 with closed source billing. sap and peoplesoft many other closed source java based items. Including full pos and inventory control software java based and closed source. ”

    What I find interesting is that you seem to think that running unsupported configurations of enterprise software is OK. As far as I know peoplesoft has very specific support requirements that you are circumventing.

    Does your management understand that they are running business software in a hacked up environment?

  3. oiaohm says:

    oldman on tile is been items red5 with closed source billing. sap and peoplesoft many other closed source java based items. Including full pos and inventory control software java based and closed source. This is why I kinda blew stack at you oldman.
    Red5 really is a through put hog.

    Running on tile is harder than running on arm. What I am doing on tile is a complete walk in park on arm servers without much effort at all.

    The tile hardware I am using is from tilera same with the distribution. Yes they are very old school Unix like. With no offical support from thrid party ISV’s at all. Yet most of the ISV products for Linux work basically perfectly. Just don’t tell them its on a tilera. I normally just tell them I an running debian Linux running on arm gets less what the. And there instructions work with ZOL. Yes ZOL tilera own Linux distribution.

    Most ISV software for Linux is not CPU based. Its java or something else cpu neutral.

    There are a few makers of ARM severs the are also quite a few mips makers these days.

    Simple point is for a lot of workloads CPU is not that much of a factor. Power usage and responsiveness is key.

    There is a standard platform in arm. But its Cordex-A 7 or greater revision.

    Really we need another ARM CPU name. That says if it this the bugger supports telling generic kernels enough information that they can work. Then we would have distributions like Redhat releasing for it.

    oldman basically x86 is important to windows. To Linux is almost completely not important.

  4. oldman says:

    “What you do with your system is your business but others could do well with other configurations.”

    Thank you for this acknowledgement. It is really the only point I was making.

    As far as what can be done, that too is the business of the person doing it, no one elses.

  5. What you do with your system is your business but others could do well with other configurations. In my own home, I have several PCs and I could shove most of what they do onto a server with no problems and probably an increase in performance. The increased performance results from file caching, more RAM, faster CPU and RAID on the server. I would have done that already except my server died. It seems to have a faulty motherboard. My wife and I both could run thin clients perfectly well for what we do.

  6. oldman says:

    “If you had access to the source code, you could improve the performance of your system by using a cluster of PCs/servers to run things. That is essentially what you do already with multi-core CPUs. Using network protocols that can be extended to more powerful systems. At some point the most powerful PC on Earth will not be able to do some task well and a network of machines is required.”

    You don’t get it Pog. Over and above the fact that it is MY resource bought with MY money, I have zero interest in maintaining source anything ( even if it were available) even if I did, I would be more likely to purchase multiple systems for MY use – that is the point in this case, It is personal computer technology. its is MINE to do with as I please.

    “All kinds of creative people in arts and science have shared. It works.”

    In the sciences, doing reseatch using expensive shared resources is SOP. In the arts not so much. But in the end this is not about institutional use, but about personal use.

    Sharing does not work for me personally. period.

    Where Pog? Most independent creative people that I know maintain their own equipment these days. If we are talking about expensive specialized equipment, then I can understand, but that is as they say a corner case. And in that case Sharing is baloney when your trying to create something.

  7. That is a special case. Millions of users consume content rather than producing it. Many who produce content do so at a keyboard or with a digital camera and even a smart phone can keep up. If you had access to the source code, you could improve the performance of your system by using a cluster of PCs/servers to run things. That is essentially what you do already with multi-core CPUs. Using network protocols that can be extended to more powerful systems. At some point the most powerful PC on Earth will not be able to do some task well and a network of machines is required.

    All kinds of creative people in arts and science have shared. It works.

  8. oldman says:

    “You suggested sharing is not good. I showed that sharing is essential.”

    There was a time when the only way that one could compose music electronically was to take ones turn using and expensive shared resource. That is where I began my journey into the computer world. It is where I learned the power of what they called Computer music. It was also where I vowed to work to duplicate that capability in resources that were mine to use without limitations.

    Fast forward 30+ years and I now have that capability literally under my fingertips as I type this. It is to be sure a big powerful system, it is some would argue overkill. What it also is is a tool with which I can compose the large symphonic compositions that I want to, when I want to.

    Please explain to me why after finally having arrived at what I want, I should want to give it up and literally get back on line to get access to this as a shared resource, Especially when I can afford it personally.

    IN this personal case Pog, Sharing is most certainly not essential.

  9. oldman says:

    “So there are some quite large work loads arm system or other cpu types can be doing for businesses. I know this from using tile processors. I don’t have support from Redhat Suse or any of the other major distributions. Yet I still run a large amount of closed source applications on them mostly due to power and threw put reasons.”

    Interesting. I am very curious Mr oiaohm. Would you mind naming the closed source applications that are running on proprietary tile processors. I’d also be interested in the vendor of your hardware.

  10. You suggested sharing is not good. I showed that sharing is essential.

  11. One can set the priority of various processes to accomplish the same ends without pausing any process. In a copy process there are longish periods when the system is waiting for completion of some task. It makes sense to do the lower priority operations in those waiting periods.

  12. Calxeda touts the advantages this way:

  13. “A 2U server containing 120 quad-core Calxeda ARM-based processors replaces an entire 40U rack of traditional commodity servers.”
  14. 1/10 the power
  15. 1/2 the cost
  16. all the performance
  17. It’s hard to think there’s no role for those features in large datacentres or small ones that want to do big jobs. The software will come even if the legacy apps don’t get ported. Which came first, the PC or the software for the PC?