LibreOffice 3.4.2

“The Internet, August 1, 2011 – The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 3.4.2, the third version of the 3.4 family, targeting both private individuals and enterprises. LibreOffice 3.4.2 fixes the majority of the most-important bugs identified by users in the previous version, and can be deployed for production needs by most enterprises.”

see TDF Blog

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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40 Responses to LibreOffice 3.4.2

  1. We’ve had problems with the database not starting properly. Apache+MySQL seems to run out of memory from time to time. The virtual machine has a limit. We may have to tweak the PHP or MySQL or Apache settings. I can now restart the service as needed without calling for help so fixes should be faster. This is all about accounting/paying for the hosted services. Previously we did not have very expensive resources so we had plenty of headroom.

  2. oldman says:

    Pog

    I looks like that last few posts to this stream (#’s 39-44) were lost. Is something wrong?

  3. oe says:

    “Someone” relates and accurate anecdote, I wrote papers and a diss in OO to avoid exactly that situation….

    OO and, now, LibreOffice, was chosen for where I had been working until recently purely on quality; there was no economic incentive for me to pick it over MSOffice2007 (the other main offering) as both were provided free to us and our projects. What qualities won OO over for about 10% of us (and a increaseing number at that):

    + True OS independence – a lot of the home Mac Users especially appreciated this as well as home and work Linux users.

    + Stability – OO, even when it did crash achieved 100% document recovery 100% of the time for me. Not the case for others who had used MSOffice….some like the user earlier related lost much work in MSOffice. I myself kept huge amounts of incremental backups of the dissertation, totally unnecessary it turned out, but reflexive habit from being burned by MSOffice.

    + Stable Interface – no forced change in UI interaction in the middle of a large document project…on the other side a forced upgrade from 2003 to 2007 occurred. No exceptions allowed due to the client-side installation of the MSOffice. Meanwhile the Linux help desk (maintaining about 1/3-1/4th the number of client seats, plus the 3 “big iron” clusters + VLAN backbone, with a staff of 2 not too busy guys vs. a staff of 15 for the Windoze seats), would with a phone request keep an old version around although it was not necessary for format/document stability.

    + Charts, Equations, Graphs – OO doesn’t pass on allowing other programs to paste in, although it’s own tools are quite impressive. Indeed the Math function by which equations are entered leverages a very Latex-like code, but also has the pick and drop down method for the occasional user.

    There are some downsides, most are minor; the major one is you can’t pass of OO’s instability and keep a straight face for having problems getting something in on time. MS Software makes a great and honest alibi surprisingly often and folks will accept that at face value.

  4. Richard Chapman says:

    “I have no idea what version of Works she was using.”

    Why should it matter what version she was using? Does Microsoft create incompatibilities across versions? (Mock incredulity)

  5. Richard Chapman says:

    “And I’m betting they were pre works 6.”

    I have no idea what version of Works she was using.

  6. Someone says:

    Pog, I think your analogy breaks down a little there. Cars with different sized tires can still be driven on the same road. Different sized paper can still be written on just the same.

    I’m trying to think of a different analogy, but I’m having trouble coming up with a suitable one on the spot. I think part of the difficulty with making a good real-world analogy is that the laws of physics are standards that even MS can’t EEE, buy out, or break interoperability with.

  7. It occurs to me that it is perverse to want to give custom to a business that messes around with file formats randomly. We don’t buy cars with a different random tire size every model and we don’t buy randomly-sized paper. Why deal with M$?

  8. oldman says:

    “someone brought in a disk with some Works documents on it.”

    And I’m betting they were pre works 6. My copy wasnt, and I’m betting that that is why I just opened the files and used them.

    “I think we all know the answer, don’t we? It has to do with money. As in how Microsoft gets your money into their pockets. Microsoft likes to break things and it’s all about money, obscene amounts of money.”

    In know that thats what you want the answer to be, but the fact remains The converter existed and the files could be transferred. End of Story.

  9. Almost any programming language can be used to write OS-independent stuff. IT/computer science is about processing information not enriching suppliers of operating systems.

  10. Someone says:

    “The notion of OS independent applications died 25 years ago Pog. Get over it!”

    Cloud computing, HTML5/Javascript, and Google, among others, would surely disagree with you.

  11. Richard Chapman says:

    “Richard Chapman, you can open works files in Word via a converter.”

    I owned a copy of works. I never needed to transfer anything from it since I hardly used it. While working in a small office though, someone brought in a disk with some Works documents on it. At first I tried Open Office (this was in 2006). That didn’t work so then I tried Office (2003 I belive) not a chance. So how was I to know I needed a converter. It wouldn’t have done me any good since IT support was off-site and I couldn’t have installed it myself.

    So you can transfer files from Works to Office and “oldman” wasn’t lying. But why isn’t compatibility built-in among like products with Microsoft as one would expect? I think we all know the answer, don’t we? It has to do with money. As in how Microsoft gets your money into their pockets. Microsoft likes to break things and it’s all about money, obscene amounts of money.

  12. oldman says:

    “Doing business with bullies is not pragmatism but surrender. That kind of thinking empowers the bully.”

    The world is full of unpleasant people and busioness Pog. If you practice what you preach, you will soon find yourself doing business with practically no one.

    As I have said before, it is not a crime to do business with microsoft, and it is definitely not a crime to do business with ISV’s whose software has the functions and features that I need and whose terms of business I can agree to.

    “They key is to be OS-independent so you can run anywhere.”

    I run on both Linux and windows on a fairly regular basis. As far as I am concerned the only way to make an application OS independent is dumb it down to the least common denominator functions. Which in my experience and the experience of others usually results in a mediocre often unusable product.

    The notion of OS independent applications died 25 years ago Pog. Get over it!

  13. Ray says:

    “You know, that stupid little starter package that’s an extremely cut down version of Office THAT ISN’T COMPATIBLE WITH ANYTHING BUT ITS SELF!”

    Richard Chapman, you can open works files in Word via a converter.

  14. oldman says:

    “Sorry to be the one to tell you this but it seems you got caught in a little white lie. Not to worry though, you talk your way out of just fine.”

    Sorry Mr. Chapman, but the version that I used had zero problems doing the conversion. You dont believe me – thats your problem, but I’m not going to waste my time lying to you or anyone for that matter.

    BTW a quick check of the file open options shows the ability to open works version 6-9 files (.wps). Excel shows quite a bit of options as well, but I dont remember which

    Anyway, there is alos this entry On the office site that describes the process.
    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/move-from-microsoft-works-to-microsoft-office-2010-HA010337946.aspx

    I dont remember having to go through this, but the information is here.

    Next Time Mr. Chapman, you may want to do some homework before you speak through ignorance and bigotry.

  15. Yep. Fonts and table formats have annoyed me a time or two. This is why it is vital to use free fonts, because you can use them on any computer with no external controls. Fonts, file-formats, protocols, etc. have all been used by M$ to make migration difficult. They key is to be OS-independent so you can run anywhere.

  16. When I migrated my organization to GNU/Linux, we found three reporting templates were done in “works”. It took an hour or two to retype them in OpenOffice.org and we were done with that problem.

  17. Richard Chapman says:

    “The last time I used works was about 8 years ago – we didn’t have office on the computer yet so we did some work. When office finally got installed, moving the word processing and spread sheet document s onto documents into word and excel was a non event. ”

    “Oldman” That story sounds a little suspicious. I’m talking about Microsoft Works. You know, that stupid little starter package that’s an extremely cut down version of Office THAT ISN’T COMPATIBLE WITH ANYTHING BUT ITS SELF!. The only word processor that can read Works documents is Works, nothing else. No business in their right mind would use such a thing. Don’t tell me that I’m educating you about Microsoft too now.

    Sorry to be the one to tell you this but it seems you got caught in a little white lie. Not to worry though, you talk your way out of just fine.

  18. oiaohm says:

    Someone know the problem with the gabled MS Office 2007.

    Its a 3 way out to get you.

    Number 1 2007 Viewer for Powerpoint does not support all features. This is not gabled but still annoying. Since this is a read only way of viewing so you cannot have auto-save nuke your work.

    Number 2. Change of printers. Yes since formatting in MS Office can be printer linked just changing default printer can send some documents to stuffed.

    Number 3 using a font that is not on the other computer. Sometimes this is enough to get MS Office formating engine badly lost so destroying document. “strange symbol replacements all over” Highly likely missing font set off the forth of july you saw. Worst part is MS Office 2007 particular service pack replaces the font set with the font the MS Office 2007 can find in the save file. Yes evil bug.

    Oldman I guess the documents are are dealing with are lightly formatted. More complex the formatting the more likely they go south. Complex presentations and documents with lot of inserted images that are bond to text are the most likely to play up badly particularly to font sub. Problem is MS auto save features don’t always have to be asked. Some bugs in MS Office cause it to auto save stuff on open it should not. Some meta data can get replaced in 2010 if you open the document and its not file set read only even if you don’t save.

    Yes bad things can happen writing to files more time than what is required.

  19. lpbbear says:

    “It is equally tiresome to hear objections to commercial software that are based on what amounts to ancient history.”

    You’re so incredibly full of it.

  20. Doing business with bullies is not pragmatism but surrender. That kind of thinking empowers the bully.

  21. Someone says:

    One of the final straws that pushed me over to Open(Libre)Office took place when I visited a friend to go to his Ph.D thesis defense. He had prepared his presentation using MS Office 2007 on his own PC, but when he got to the presentation room and loaded his slideshow, that copy of MS Office 2007 completely garbled his presentation. I still don’t know what exactly happened, but it was entirely illegible with strange symbol replacements all over, and all of the formulas were corrupted beyond recognition.

    He had to reschedule his defense, which also meant that about 5 professors had to reschedule for it. That’s how bad it was. He had spent about 2-3 weeks just on the presentation, so he needed to redo it now. Each time he loaded his laptop file into the presentation PC, it mangled it. He did check on his laptop, and after loading into the presentation room PC, the slide show from the presentation PC was now mangled on his own PC. I’m guessing it must have done an auto-save or something while the file was still on the presentation PC

    I knew about OpenOffice at the time and offered that to him as a possible option. 2 weeks later, he successfully defended his thesis with an OpenOffice.org presentation. He told me afterwards he liked OO.org better, because apparently it offered a more powerful method of entering math formulas. As far as I know, he’s been using it (probably now Libre) ever since.

  22. oldman says:

    “t is rather tiresome, oldman, when you argue that the world owes M$ a living by trying everything they sell. ”

    It is equally tiresome to hear objections to commercial software that are based on what amounts to ancient history. If for no other reason that the objections may be to situations that no longer exists.

    One of the things I have learned having to work in both worlds is that if you are going to make a case for something you had better have your facts lined up and fresh. Trying to make a case against microsoft office based on its behavior 8 years ago may go over with the like minded people but it gets you shot down or dismissed out of hand pretty quickly with anyone else.

  23. It is rather tiresome, oldman, when you argue that the world owes M$ a living by trying everything they sell. That doesn’t fly. That’s why M$ has salesmen and why they got OEMs to bundle their software with PCs.

  24. oldman says:

    “What makes you think it’s Open(Libre)Office that’s doing the trashing. Microsoft is well known for breaking things. Ever get any documents out of Works? Kind of a funny name when you think of it.”

    The last time I used works was about 8 years ago – we didn’t have office on the computer yet so we did some work. When office finally got installed, moving the word processing and spread sheet document s onto documents into word and excel was a non event.

    So, sorry to disappoint you, it actually did “work” Mr. chapman.

  25. oldman says:

    “On an project I worked in the late 90′s to about ’03 there were about 8-9 main groups.”

    So your anecdotal experience of 8 years ago with a version that is at least 3 generations back is supposed to impress me? Try Office 2010 version and then we’ll talk!

  26. oe says:

    On an project I worked in the late 90’s to about ’03 there were about 8-9 main groups. All ours used MS Office….and they were always giving us problems about it. Funny though during the quarterly reports there was a revovling door as many would come down to recover their MSWord documents that were “trashed” into binary hash and unable to be opened by their native wordprocessor. Yet WordPerfect was able to recover 70-90% of these in a format alien to it. Seems good anecdotal evidence as to where the trashing is occurring. That lesson has stayed with me to this day and I avoid such a poor quality of office products.

  27. Richard Chapman says:

    “And yet I have seen it trash documents in situations where one has to go to and from Office on a regular basis.”

    What makes you think it’s Open(Libre)Office that’s doing the trashing. Microsoft is well known for breaking things. Ever get any documents out of Works? Kind of a funny name when you think of it.

  28. oldman says:

    “Open(Libre)Office has been good enough to write technical papers for conferences in I have found, it can’t be that anemic…..I find the “killer feature” is how stable the odf format remains from version to version, despite the addition of features.”

    And yet I have seen it trash documents in situations where one has to go to and from Office on a regular basis.

    The fact that a relatively new format like ODF remains stable doesn’t impress me. I have several document written in word 97 that I still go back to. They are still readable and their formatting is intact.

    Then again I may just be lucky.

  29. That is a bit of a pain. The way I deal with it though is to use a local copy and distribute it over the LAN. That way, we can update 5 computers with a single download. Last year, I was maintaining software on almost 100 PCs with a single download. Networking is the solution. We should share with folks who are stuck on dial-up.

  30. Someone says:

    @ Ray:

    If it makes you feel any better, the updates for MS Office tend to weigh in at around that file size too, sometimes 3-4x larger.

  31. Ray says:

    Someone, I hope they are able to do update it without having to download 189MB… 🙁

  32. oe says:

    Open(Libre)Office has been good enough to write technical papers for conferences in I have found, it can’t be that anemic…..I find the “killer feature” is how stable the odf format remains from version to version, despite the addition of features.

  33. Contrarian says:

    “I know of a handful of local businesses…”

    How convenient!

    “Their focus is on bottom line savings, not how pretty the website is.”

    Well, sure, no one cares about appearances. That web site proves it.

    “innuendo1”

    Thanks for the definition. It clears up a lot of misunderstanding!

  34. Someone says:

    @Ray:

    Sadly, yes. Although it’s a trivial thing across all 3 operating systems, and it doesn’t affect any of your extensions, toolbar settings, etc.

    Hopefully they will change that at some point in the future.

  35. Ray says:

    Hey, do you still have to reinstall to update libreoffice yet?

  36. I think your comment shows more about Contrarian than The Document Foundation.

    Nothing of substance, just innuendo1.

    1. An oblique hint; a remote allusion or reference, usually
      derogatory to a person or thing not named; an insinuation.
      [1913 Webster]

    I have exposed thousands of people to OpenOffice.org and a few to LibreOffice. Not once did anyone find fault with the software in terms of the products it produces. Many were disbelieving that anything so wonderful could be obtained for $0.

    I am not alone. Thousands of organizations around the world have deployed OpenOffice.org, probably more than have deployed M$’s office suite. LibreOffice is still basically the same code but diverging. I use if frequently with no problem.

  37. lpbbear says:

    I seriously doubt the so called “business owner” will care what the web site looks like. Their focus is on bottom line savings, not how pretty the website is.

  38. Richard Chapman says:

    You’re trying too hard Contrarian.

  39. Someone says:

    Well, say what you like, Contrarian, but I know of a handful of local businesses that have already either begun or completed a switchover to LibreOffice on most of their departments–seeing savings of over $100,000 per year (at the minimum–some are saving much more) in their budgets to be used on more important things than software licenses.

    That’s just phase 1 (LibreOffice on Windows). Phase 2 for some of them will be dumping Windows (XP) as well for either Ubuntu or Red Hat.

    And guess what? The employees still get their work done and most had no trouble at all with the changeover.

  40. Contrarian says:

    Did they create those distorted pie charts with some kind of FOSS product? I haven’t paid much attention to OO or this offshoot either, but my first impression is that, if I were a business owner looking for some sort of solution to office automation that saved me some money, I would not spend much time investigating anything with such a clumsy web site appearance.

    Even you could help them out here, #pogson.

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