Video From Walmart for GNU/Linux

“Requirements: Internet connection of at least 1 Mbps. A recent web browser, such as Internet Explorer 7, Firefox 3, Chrome 7 or Safari 5.”

No mention of an OS at all. This should work with GNU/Linux. NETFLIX, Good-Bye.

Oops!

“Please note: Video on Demand is currently only available to locations in the United States.”

see vudu at Walmart.com

If anyone has this working on GNU/Linux in USA, let us know. The site also says that other OS and MacOS are supported… I was able to view scenes from the first two minutes of The Bridge at Remagen (1969) but could not actually watch the video sample.

At the vudu.com site, I found, “What version of Adobe Flash do I need for web playback?
Flash 10.2.153.1 is required. You can download the latest version of Flash here.

http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

If you are using Google Chrome, the newest version will always have the latest version of Flash pre-installed.

http://www.google.com/chrome

At this time, only Windows and Mac OS are supported. Linux support is not yet available.”

This is probably the DRM-Flash thing again… I have Version: 10.3.181 on Chrome.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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35 Responses to Video From Walmart for GNU/Linux

  1. lpbbear says:

    I see “oldman and “Contrarian” are (cough cough) “contributing” their usual useless BS.

    A few years ago, after going through the bills and finding yet another small increase to my Sat. bill I decided I was done with Sat and Cable TV. That last bill was something like $45.00. Sure, I had a zillion channels…..of crap.

    Remember when TV was actually free?

    Then cable came along. The selling point was clearer reception and a bit more choice with the initial price being in the ballpark of 12 bucks a month. About the right price for basic entertainment. Right where the average viewer wouldn’t feel like they were being charged too much.

    Then, gradually, the price began to creep upward. $15, $20, $25….etc to the point where viewers were paying $600.00 or more a year! I find that rather exorbitant especially given the fact that commercials are also still providing huge revenue to TV/Cable channels.

    While the price and number of channels climbed strangely the quality declined. At the point I “dropped out” I was paying for a zillions channels but only actually watching 4 to 10 channels. The rest was trash. Prior to dropping service I called my provider and asked if Ala Carte was available. “No, sorry sir, that is not available.”

    These days I use a small PC running a quad core AMD, NVidia video card and Linux. I watch a wide variety of sources with it. HULU, Crackle, TNT, Clicker, Boxee, XBMC, and many others.

    I also purchased a Roku (Linux based) for Netflix, Crackle, Internet Archive, and a large and growing number of other sources.

    For the future I am adopting the “20 buck” limit for this kind of entertainment. If I am subscribing to a media source, such as Netflix for instance, that becomes more expensive than $20 a month…..it either gets dropped or modified to a lower service level. I’m just not going to pay any more than that for entertainment ever again.

    This is simply entertainment after all and its not worth any more money than that.

  2. oldman says:

    “No I can’t “oldman” but you can. That’s how it works and that’s why it’s not working for you.”

    Mr. Chapman, thats about as straight an answer as I’ve gotten from you. It interesting in the end that you admit that there is no alternative. Its also interesting that you admit that in the end software use is personal choice.

    Fair enough.

    FOSS running on a linux desktop does clearly “work” well enough that a substantial number of computer users find it viable as an alternative to commercial software. You are clearly one of those people. When you state it this way, as a personal choice, you are at your most effective. When you make snide remarks about other peoples choices you are just noise.

    Something to consider.

  3. Richard Chapman says:

    “Can you show me an alternative that runs under your beloved Linux OS?”

    No I can’t “oldman” but you can. That’s how it works and that’s why it’s not working for you.

  4. oldman says:

    “Oh, you’re waiting for me? “oldman” I’ve answered that question (whatever it was) and many like it numerous times on these pages, so has Robert. Just because you act stupid saying the same things over and over doesn’t mean I have to follow suit. ”

    No Mr. Chapman, I wasn’t waiting for you, and your non answer is pretty much as expected. As far as I am concerned, you have nothing to say at all.

    Calling microsoft as beloved is almost funny Mr. Chapman. Ther are the vendor who platform and tools that the ISV’s that I do business with use.

    I’ve made very clear what I use and why. Can you show me an alternative that runs under your beloved Linux OS?

    “Besides, you’re not here to further knowledge and understanding of IT. You’re here to defend your beloved Microsoft and to throw your “dirt” at GNU/Linux.”

    Mr. Chapman you have proven time and time again that you have nothing to say beyond in effect “it works for me” and “go away and leave us alone”

    As far as furthering IT is concerned, what have YOU done besides throw dirt at commercial software built on Microsoft and insinuate that those of use who keep current in our hardware and software purchases for personal and professional reasons are somehow hollow for doing so, while you who uses an 8 year old computer hardware and linux/FOSS is somehow Pure and noble.

    Spare me the bushwah Mr. Chapman.

    At least Robert Pogson provides a good counterpoint to my comments in what is in the end a floating bull session about IT.

    You provide nothing.

  5. Richard Chapman says:

    Oh, you’re waiting for me? “oldman” I’ve answered that question (whatever it was) and many like it numerous times on these pages, so has Robert. Just because you act stupid saying the same things over and over doesn’t mean I have to follow suit. Besides, you’re not here to further knowledge and understanding of IT. You’re here to defend your beloved Microsoft and to throw your “dirt” at GNU/Linux.

  6. oldman says:

    “You’re asking too much to get a straight answer from Chapman.”

    Perhaps.

    But silence from Chappy is tantamount to admission that he has no answer beyond a sneer.

  7. Zombie Chan says:

    You’re asking too much to get a straight answer from Chapman.

  8. oldman says:

    “Kind of hard to answer your point when I don’t really read your crap. I just kind of scan it to see you you are writing anything new. You weren’t, so I didn’t.”

    But then again you never did answer anything that I put forth with anything beside some snarky comment that says more about your arrogance than anything.

    Lets try again…

    So Chappy, let ask you, should I have foregone being able to get my composing done in a better way just so I could hang on to a system a little longer?

    How about a straight answer for once Mr. Chapman?

  9. Someone says:

    s/@Someone/@oldman

  10. Someone says:

    @Someone:

    You appear to be talking about actual features. That’s fine. But Flash is known to be poorly optimized, especially so on OSX and Linux builds, so its resource use is a different story indeed.

  11. Richard Chapman says:

    “INteresting that as usual you dont’ choose to answer my point.”

    Kind of hard to answer your point when I don’t really read your crap. I just kind of scan it to see you you are writing anything new. You weren’t, so I didn’t.

  12. Ray says:

    Wait, I thought it works with Boxee, which runs on Linux.

  13. oldman says:

    “In 5 years you are going to have to pay someone to haul away that hunk of junk sitting on your desk.”

    Ah Chappy, I see we are back to our content free snarks. INteresting that as usual you dont’ choose to answer my point. Any rate, as per your observation, but it bluntly.

    So what?

    You see, the upgrade was triggered by my desire to have the function and feature that the software offered. I actually installed it on the older hardware for starters, only to find out that it needed more memory and horsepower to handle my larger musical composition. The fcat is, I had gotten what I considered my moneys worth out of the system, and I will get my moneys worth out of my current system.

    So Chappy, let ask you, should I have foregone being able to get my composing done in a better way just so I could hang on to a system a little longer?

    If Yes, then whats the point of having tool like a computer?

  14. Richard Chapman says:

    I’ve got an old guitar amplifier I bought at a garage sale many years ago. It’s called a Fender Vibro Champ Amp. It’s a very small amp. One 8″ speaker and I think it puts out about 10 watts. It’s an all tube amp too. Russia and China are the only countries making vacuum tubes and that’s been the case since the 1980s or so. If you can find RCA, Silvania or Ratheon tubes in new condition they are almost worth their weight in gold. They are used for high end stereo components. Yes, vinyl records and all. They would be a waste on a lowly guitar amp. Speaking of which, I paid $50 for the Champ. Today it’s worth $550. In 5 years you are going to have to pay someone to haul away that hunk of junk sitting on your desk.

  15. oldman says:

    “Chewing up 89% of my CPU cycles when other codecs/player combinations use only 20% is not progress “oldman”, that is unless you are using Microsoft’s definition of the word “progress”.”

    Well then, you didnt say that you had something working for you. Its good to know Mr. Chapman that your antiquated rig can still be made to work for you.

    My definition of progress is defined by the progression of function and features that have occured over time in my apps. 11 years ago Finale could barely handle playback by attached Midi instruments. Now it can use in memory samplers, hall simulation algorithms and a so called human playback algorithm to give me on demand rendition of my music that I can commit to WAV for mat and burn to disk. The fact that I’ve had to upgrade my hardware twice in 11 years to support the increased demand of the application is as far as I am concerned part of the requirement for using the application that I want to use.

  16. Richard Chapman says:

    Chewing up 89% of my CPU cycles when other codecs/player combinations use only 20% is not progress “oldman”, that is unless you are using Microsoft’s definition of the word “progress”.

  17. oldman says:

    “One should not have to buy a new CPU just because Flash has extra computation not needed by other software. It is a point against Flash that it is such a burden on the CPU.”

    Nor should one expect that the progress of software will be retarded in order to support systems as old as the one in question. One does not need to purchase I high end system to run flash, it runs quite well on a currently shipping low end system from what I have seen.

  18. It is true that mplayer or vlc can display full-screen video at much lower CPU loads for other formats, so upgrading the CPU is barely justified by Flash. You don’t buy an Indie car just because they exist. One should not have to buy a new CPU just because Flash has extra computation not needed by other software. It is a point against Flash that it is such a burden on the CPU.

  19. oldman says:

    “A postage stamp size video chews up 89% of my CPU cycles. What the hell kind of technology is that? So get a bigger faster CPU? That doesn’t make Flash more efficient. It just makes you a dupe for making up for Adobe’s lousy product.”

    It is nobodys problem but yours that your computer is 8 years old and the state of the art in applications passed you by.

    Blaming an application for your choice to opt out of what you see as an “unnecessary” upgrade cycle is IMHO baloney.

  20. Netflix does not work with GNU/Linux.

  21. Ray says:

    Pog, what’s wrong with Netflix anyways?

  22. Richard Chapman says:

    “I don’t own a TV of any sort.”

    Why am I not surprised?

    Neither am I.

  23. Contrarian says:

    “Of course they could use Google’s new video format. It’s designed for efficiency.”

    You should just get a $90 blu-ray DVD player with the wi-fi feature. Then your computer could be your computer and your TV could be your TV. You could use them individually or at the same time in different rooms. Even in the same room, but that is a little antisocial.

    I don’t know (or care) what is under the hood of the Sony DVD player, but it might even be Linux. You could at least pretend to yourself that was the case.

  24. Contrarian says:

    “I don’t own a TV of any sort.”

    Why am I not surprised?

  25. I have a really whimpy system and 720p only gets me to 60% cpu usage. It may depend on the video, I suppose. If my CPU is normally idling, I don’t see anything wrong with Flash replacing the idle-loop. 1080p probably would not work on this thing… but it will on our Atomic PC by the TV.

    Of course they could use Google’s new video format. It’s designed for efficiency.

  26. My computer has an HDTV connected… No Bose though.

  27. Richard Chapman says:

    I don’t own a TV of any sort. I do all my media on my computer. My Living Room is a Living Room (more “oldman” style) not a vector for mind numbing adverts.

    I don’t think Flash is a solution for anything. A postage stamp size video chews up 89% of my CPU cycles. What the hell kind of technology is that? So get a bigger faster CPU? That doesn’t make Flash more efficient. It just makes you a dupe for making up for Adobe’s lousy product.

  28. Contrarian says:

    “So, it works on GNU/Linux with Chrome web browser! Good.”

    What kind of silly techno-dweeb would watch a film on a computer? Use an HDTV with a Bose sound system!

  29. So, it works on GNU/Linux with Chrome web browser! Good. Good-bye, Netflix.

    I doubt there is enough GNU/Linux clients in USA to sway Netflix but they may be convinced if Walmart takes enough share. They might even switch to Flash or other universally supported technology. I’ve read that there is a Netflix client for Android/Linux.

    The “chop” should be handled if there is a large enough buffer. It would be nice if a package learned the limitations of its platform and buffered enough before letting her rip. Then, one could “buy” the movie and download it as well.

  30. Was there ever a bad movie about war? One doesn’t need good acting, lines or a plot if there is enough “action”. 😉

  31. Richard Chapman says:

    I couldn’t find any link for a trailer but I did use the link provided. It worked on my version of Chromium (12.0.742.112). I don’t know what the definition was but it was choppy. I should be able to stream HD (720p).

  32. Richard Chapman says:

    WalMart doesn’t seem to think anyone would want to see a trailer for the movie they might like to rent. So I couldn’t test their service. I’m not about to rent a movie on the spot either.

  33. Ray says:

    About Netflix, you can actually install it on Linux via Boxee.

  34. oe says:

    I can agree with Steve Jobs on one thing, DRM-enabled Flash is all the more reason to scrap Adobe’s bloatwares and adopt either Ogg Theora and/or WebM, the latter being from Google, both have struck me a solid and efficient open standards.

  35. Contrarian says:

    Well, #pogson, you are perhaps barking up the wrong tree here. I have to admit that I myself am somewhat new to the web-based TV thing, with a mere year of direct experience, but let me tell you, it is like night and day! There are a couple of dozen sources for material, VuDu being one of them. The most popular, I think, are Netflix streaming video ($7.99 per mo) and Hulu ($8). Netflix lets you view tens of thousands of films and season series DVDs for popular programs, all commercial free. Hulu lets you watch, on demand, thousands of current and old series shows with very limited commercial interruption. Typically you can watch the common 30 minute scheduled episode in a 24 minute timespan since the common 5 minute commercial breaks are reduced to a single or sometimes double 30 second break.

    The way to do it is to buy a blue-ray player (I have a Sony I bought at Costco for $90 that is wi-fi enabled” and let it sort out what you want to watch). I also have a newer TV with the capability built-in although those models typically cost more than the price of the blue-ray if added to a TV with the same specs. Think of internet with no advertising!

    Movies from Amazon, Sony, Vudu, and a number of others are 1080p, too, the same as blue-ray disks and better than the 720p HDTV from the cable company.

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