Buy Chrome OS Netbooks Today

Kogan has rushed forward with the world’s first Chrome OS-bearing netbook you can buy today. Shipments start in 4 days. Assuming the hardware is not junk, this thing will sell a ton because there is a demand for small cheap computers. The Agora netbook boots in 4.5s and costs only $439… Who could not love that?

see Kogan releases the world’s first Chrome OS laptop

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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11 Responses to Buy Chrome OS Netbooks Today

  1. twitter says:

    I’m laughing out loud listening to a bunch of Windows people blame the user for Windows being something that takes lots of upkeep:

    Of course if you assume that the user is computer indifferent (i.e. not a geek) and will never acquire the necessary skills to make maintainence easier, yes maintenance could be an issue.

    Windows is now only for geeks with the patience to deal with it’s headaches and useless, monthly patching? Why bother with that when less effort brings more from gnu/linux distributions like Debian?

    Vista 7 does not run on Netbooks. You can visit any big box store and see overpriced, bloated “netbooks” struggle under Windows 7. They have power hungry CPUs, often dual core, heavy mechanical hard drives and all the other kit needed to run Vista without draining the life blood out of Windows desktop sales. They are slugs right out of the box and performance degrades over time. My favorite restriction is the three program limit. Ha! GNU/Linux runs much better, of course.

    I wonder if Microsoft will be around long enough to launch Vista 8. Their products are outmatched on all fronts. Geeks get more bang for their effort with gnu/linux. People who want their hands held and cheap ultra portable computing will go with Chrome or Android. Mom and pop computer stores should shift their efforts to customizing gnu/linux for their business and performance customers, myth TV and consoles for gaming and entertainment, and Chrome/Android which might also be customized for everyone else.

  2. Contrarian says:

    Sleep mode keeps the registers alive and just goes in to a very low power mode. But if you are on battery power, it will eventually deplete the battery. Hibernate copies all the RAM to hard disk and shuts down completely and no power is being used. When it re-starts it just has to read the amount of memory stored so it comes back quickly, but not instantly as it does in sleep mode.

  3. Ray says:

    Whatever happened to sleep/standby mode?

  4. oldman says:

    “Fully functioning notebooks require a lot of work to remain fully functioning. That is worth the premium.”

    Of course if you assume that the user is computer indifferent (i.e. not a geek) and will never acquire the necessary skills to make maintainence easier, yes maintenance could be an issue.

    But of course running windows 7 on a reasonably provisioned reasonably modern system is a lot easier than the environment that you are familiar with.

  5. Contrarian says:

    12 – 15 sec, that is.

  6. Contrarian says:

    I almost always use Hibernate for my notebook to shut down and the restart is about 12 – 1sec. That way you are right back where you were when you shut it down and you can have a bunch of things open and they remain that way after it is restarted. Why would you want to do a cold restart anyway?

    I almost never reboot my workstation although it may reboot itself now and then when some update that needs a reboot is installed.

  7. oldman says:

    “So “oldman”, long boot time no longer matter to you? They are just part of the daily compute for you?”

    My machines are on continually and only reboot once a month in the wee hours as part of windows automatic update.

    The above aside, my portable boots in 30 seconds (SSD Disk) and my desktop boots in roughly 60 seconds.

    Please keep in mind that just because you choose to run with older hardware, not everyone else does.

  8. ray says:

    I’d rather get the cheapest netbook, then install xpud.

  9. Fully functioning notebooks require a lot of work to remain fully functioning. That is worth the premium.

  10. Richard Chapman says:

    So “oldman”, long boot time no longer matter to you? They are just part of the daily compute for you?

  11. oldman says:

    “The Agora netbook boots in 4.5s and costs only $439…”

    Who cares about its boot time, It’s just a dumb terminal Pog. It isnt even cheap! An individual can purchase a fully functioning laptop for about the same price.

    Let someone produce in this form factor at a cost (say under $100 US) where it becomes a disposable purchase, and it may go somewhere in the business market.

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