Doing

Dan Reisinger found 10 things tablet PCs cannot do. He is right of course, but that does not matter. Everyone does not need to do everything with their PC. Tablets have a place in the world where smaller, cheaper, more portable matter more than feature-bloat. Conversely, there are some things a desktop PC cannot do like be portable. Notebooks are portable but they are bulkier and heavier than tablets so those who love portability will choose one or the other.

Every kind of personal computing device has a role otherwise they would not have been created. GNU/Linux has a role in personal computing as well. Perhaps GNU/Linux cannot run some application or other but it does not matter. Many will be quite happy with what they get from GNU/Linux, flexibility, reliability, performance, and low price. I don’t run any app that will not run on GNU/Linux and I do a lot with personal computers. I only know a few people who need some particular app that is not available on GNU/Linux.

Even my wife has been converted. In two weeks we have found only two features that she had with that other OS that she does not have with GNU/Linux and we have simple work-arounds for both: download a file and work on it on the PC or run some particular client app. One feature was an ActiveX thingy on a particular website. Fortunately she can download a PDF and use it in GNU/Linux. The other feature was working transparently with a Nikon camera (PTP only). She has to run a client application to transfer the pictures. That was not noticed for a week because she was using a Fuji camera for the first week. She does all the usual things in a similar manner and can open all her old files. So, she has the same capabilities as before even if they are accessed differently. She does have a system that will not slow down however. GNU/Linux works for her and our grand daughter who is just learning to click a mouse.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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5 Responses to Doing

  1. Ray says:

    “The iPod nano (2009 generation) required a terminal based low level format, but the 2010 era iPod Touch plugged in and “just worked”.”

    That will probably turn many people away though.

  2. Dann says:

    Netbooks don’t tend to have touchscreens as tablets do.
    If you use ARM and/or remove Winxp/7 license fees, tablets and netbooks are about even.
    Consider that ARM performance has an edge against x86 when comparing power and battery life together.

    Always Innovating netbook is also a tablet. The tablet part is cheaper (netbook includes a keyboard for +$100) and uses ARM.

  3. oe says:

    Speaking of that Lucid Lynx works great with iPods, the teenagers have them, I don’t, I used a 8 year Palm PDA for music…..poormans’ Ipad. Rythombox and gtkpod natively sync and transfer music, pics and podcasts without the bloated mess that is iTunes. DRM is gone too. The iPod nano (2009 generation) required a terminal based low level format, but the 2010 era iPod Touch plugged in and “just worked”. FOSS is great stuff and out Macing the Mac…..

  4. Well, there is a potential to be cheaper: ARM instead of x86, no keyboard, no licence for that other OS. These are still early days for tablets. The initial wave of adoption can pay a higher price. Later the price will fall. There will be lots of consolidation and competition. The first 64bit CPUs were $1k+. Now some are less than $100 and you can buy quad-core for less than $200.

  5. lefty.crupps says:

    > Tablets have a place in the world where smaller,
    > cheaper, more portable matter more than feature-bloat

    Which tablet is cheaper than a netbook?

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