ASUS Plans Its Escape

For decades, M$ has held OEMs for ransom. If they wanted to sell a PC that PC had to have M$’s product. Not so any longer. Dell and ASUS have dabbled with shipping PCs without that other OS but the tablet is changing the competitive landscape. To sell netbooks, ASUS and others will have to lower the price. ASUS is expected to ship a netbook for $250 or less in June. The cost of materials is over $250 likely so there is no room for profit and a licence fee to M$.
“The sources believe that Asustek’s new netbook should either adopt Google’s Android 3.0 or Chrome OS in order to achieve such a price level, and the new model is expected to attract consumers who only need to perform office work and Internet browsing.”

see Digitimes

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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15 Responses to ASUS Plans Its Escape

  1. oldman says:

    “Digitimes monitors what suppliers are doing in response to consumer demand. It is a leading indicator. For example, Digitimes will cover monthly reports while the rest of the world looks at quarterly reports”

    So what? The fact that digitime’s monitor the logistics of supplier to OEM in response to consumer demand in known markets, means nothing in this context. They still cant predict where new markets will develop, nor can they predict how a particular hardware construct that breaks the rules of the market will sell.

  2. Digitimes monitors what suppliers are doing in response to consumer demand. It is a leading indicator. For example, Digitimes will cover monthly reports while the rest of the world looks at quarterly reports.

  3. oldman says:

    “Digitimes has spies all over Taiwan’s electronics/computer industries. They know what’s happening long before many other sites do. They also start their day 12h before I do. I do not recall an instance when they were far off.”

    Perhaps, but the gist of the article is still speculation. Digitimes can no more know how the market is going to play out than ASUS supposedly will, and digitimes prognostications beyond its niche clientele are of limited relevance.

  4. Digitimes has spies all over Taiwan’s electronics/computer industries. They know what’s happening long before many other sites do. They also start their day 12h before I do. I do not recall an instance when they were far off.

  5. oldman says:

    It is interesting to read the actual article. I was struck bu this portion

    “The sources believe that Asustek’s new netbook should either adopt Google’s Android 3.0 or Chrome OS in order to achieve such a price level, and the new model is expected to attract consumers who only need to perform office work and Internet browsing.”

    So the article is essentially speculation. It probably not entirely fact free, but the articles content certainly doesnt warrant your analysis Pog.

    Hardware vendors everywhere would love to be able to push the cost of useable computing equipment down below the $400.00 range that it seems to be stuck in. The problem is that they need applications and an operating system to run it. Android 3. may provide the platform and their is an application set out there, but the real question is how useful people will actually find these devices.

  6. Yes. The more lucrative the tech business the more likely insiders will sacrifice morality for profit. The yesmen never want to second-guess the boss and the yuppies want to cater to the desperate needs for more money and power. Think of it. Why does anyone want to head a $billion company after they have earned hundreds or thousands of times more money than they actually need to live? It is rarely to make the world a better place but rather to build egos. It’s like a bunch of dogs wanting to be the alpha-male.

  7. Richard Chapman says:

    We don’t live in a world where everyone is willing to sacrifice their integrity. If we did, planes would be falling out of the sky and bridges would collapse on first use. In other words, they would perform just like Microsoft’s Windows does on security. Fortunately most people do have integrity in what they do.

  8. Ray says:

    “I also heard there are people willing to sacrifice their integrity to support a company they’ve grown attached to. Sometimes to great depths too.”

    It happens to everything…

  9. Richard Chapman says:

    I heard there’s a rumor going around that certain proprietary interests are seeding the blogsphere with bits of false information blaming the stricken reactor at the Fukushima complex not on the largest earthquake to hit the region in over 500 years but on Linux.

    I also heard there are people willing to sacrifice their integrity to support a company they’ve grown attached to. Sometimes to great depths too.

  10. Ray says:

    “There is one way manufacturers can regain some money, by installing crapware. So the actual price of that Other OS may even be ZERO. Thank god there is no crapware software for GNU//Linux, and even if it were it would be easy to remove”

    I’ll bet 5 dollars on OEM installing crapware on Linux,nd there wouldn’t be a software to remove them… 🙁

  11. lpbbear says:

    “I heard that Linux was the reason that the Japanese nuclear reactors failed. Was it because they didn’t have the most recent patched kernel?”

    Really? I heard it was Microsoft Windows that caused the earthquake and then Ballmer threw another chair which hit the ocean and caused the tsunami.

  12. Funeral parlors don’t sell rap music. Perhaps OEMs of PCs should not sell crapware. Perhaps they should have respect for their customers. Perhaps retailers should have some respect for customers. At one time M$ forbade crapware. They used that rule to prevent competition however…

    I don’t know the magnitude of crapware-fees. I doubt they are as large as the cut M$ takes.

  13. I heard it was because they placed the generators on low ground. The plant itself was on low ground. Considering that there is no limit on the height of a tsunami, that does not seem wise in retrospect. The reactors were designed to shut down automatically in case of earthquake so they could not produce their own electrical power. There must be a solution to those problems somewhere. Perhaps a ship-born diesel plant combined with some large batteries on springs…

  14. Bender says:

    There is one way manufacturers can regain some money, by installing crapware. So the actual price of that Other OS may even be ZERO. Thank god there is no crapware software for GNU//Linux, and even if it were it would be easy to remove 🙂

  15. Mega Mung says:

    I heard that Linux was the reason that the Japanese nuclear reactors failed. Was it because they didn’t have the most recent patched kernel?

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