One of a Thousand Cuts or Decapitation?

Wintel has received another blow, from Intel this time.
As Microsoft has announced its Windows operating system will add support for ARM-based platforms, Intel has recently decided to cooperate with Taiwan-based notebook makers including Inventec and Compal Electronics to push Intel/Android solutions and will showcase several devices based on the new solution at Intel Developer Forum (IDF) Beijing in April 2011, according to sources from notebook makers.

In addition to Windows and its self-developed MeeGo, Intel has add support for Android to its processors and the new strategy will allow its partners to have more choice, while significantly saving costs from licensing fees.

More choice. Isn’t that sweet?

Why would OEMs ship Android instead of that other OS? Because it is less expensive and the market demands small cheap computers. Now retailers will have something else to put on shelves. OEMs have tiny margins. They can raise margins significantly by shipping Android while reducing the retail price a bit. Everyone wins except M$. That’s good business because the world does not need to work for M$.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to One of a Thousand Cuts or Decapitation?

  1. oldman says:

    “But it CAN. I think that’s what Pog is getting at.”

    As someone who tried to use a smart phone the way that Pog proposes, my experience makes me doubt this.

    On the other hand I am seeing a lot of iPads with keyboards integrated into a custom cover.

  2. The northern bush of Canada and remote parts of the Arctic are third world-ish. Where I was working last year most folks had no running water except in a few buildings, for instance, yet Canada is a wealthy nation and water is not in short supply. Even in such remote places, kids carried smart thingies and use them for all kinds of web activities. They visit wifi hot spots and browse/chat. It was not uncommon for folks to have a PC that was not connected to the web just for playing music/videos/games. That is different. You see differences between nations, continents, regions, age-groups, and sexes. At the school, I could see the girls used facebook etc. while the boys wanted games.

  3. Dann says:

    “Pog seems to think that android can function as a desktop”

    It can/does for many people, but obviously one device will not capture 100% of audiences.
    And hooking up a monitor/speakers/keyboard/mouse to a phone in order to use it as a desktop probably isn’t a widely known use case. But it CAN. I think that’s what Pog is getting at.
    Especially when you look at places like India where a cellphone is basically the height of technological prowess in many poorer parts of the country. As a 1st world nation, I’m sure there are a lot of biases in how we think regarding technology.

  4. nightgoblin says:

    Hopefully there will be some MeeGo (or is it Moblin again?) devices on the market. Diversity is good.

  5. oldman says:

    “Your answer(?) is essentially the same as Pogs answer. He just used more words. ;)”

    Good point. However as you well know, Pog seems to think that android can function as a desktop (or at lease a netbook) OS. A market that is IMHO not, to the average reseller at least, proven.

  6. lpbbear says:

    “Because it sells hardware?”

    Your answer(?) is essentially the same as Pogs answer. He just used more words. 😉

  7. oldman says:

    “Why would OEMs ship Android instead of that other OS?”

    Because it sells hardware?

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